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So I'm left with a floor jack, the flying miata adapter, and two flat top jack stands. With the adapter, can I lift between the jacking points and not do damage to the pinch weld? To me, it appears that plastic is on the inside of the pinch weld. Plastic doesn't make a good jacking point.

If I can jack in the middle, can I put flat top jack stands under the lift points and not do damage to the pinch welds? Do I need 2 more flying miata adapters?

It shouldn't be this tough to perform routine maintenance. I can't believe I'm considering paying someone to change a tire.
So I solved the problem in this fashion:

1) On each side of the car, on the interior side of the pinch weld I had my shop weld a 6" length of 1" X 1" square steel tubing. That gives enough support for my floor jack to lift each side of the car. The shop assessed that the car's body is strong enough to support being lifted at these new jack points. The 1" X 1" steel tubing was placed such that using it as the single jack point on a side will lift both wheels at the same rate.

2) Using a floor jack at the new, more-centrally located jack point, I lift one side, placing flat-topped jack stands under the OEM jacking points, and then I do the same on the other side of the car. In two minutes, I've got the car up on four flat-topped jack stands, and it's completely stable sitting on them.

The shop noticed that the pinch welds are wider/thicker at the OEM jack points than they are in between the jack points. I would assume that, the issue of the plastic underpanel aside, your using the Miata adapter between the two OEM jacking points would work just fine, as you won't be asking anything of the pinch weld. My shop cut a 6"-long, 1"-wide strip out of the plastic underpanel to fit in the piece of steel stock they welded to the car.

In case you're wondering why I had the shop weld the steel pieces in instead of just using the Miata adapter, that was because I didn't want to have to fool with the adapter. I felt that it would be more stable with the floor jack's rubber pad pressing up against the car itself (albeit with a new piece welded to the car).

Photos

The Tools

Where the Floor Jack will be Positioned

Ready to Lift

Two Minutes Later...Lifted!

The 6"-Long 1" X 1" Piece of Square Steel Stock (outlined in red) Welded in Place Behind the Pinch Weld (the yellow line)

The Front OEM Jack Point (outlined w/yellow tape) and One of the New Jack Points (painted red)

The Distance Between the Front OEM Jack Point and the New Jack Point

Both New Floor Jack Points Shown from Underneath the Car (shown with strips of yellow tape)
 

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i have a normal jack that can't even fit underneath the car. i went to look at the low profile ones and i've having some serious doubt if it would fit... any other options? the thing i do now, is to raise the car with the spare tyre kit jack before using my jack to place the jack stands underneath..
 

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i have a normal jack that can't even fit underneath the car. i went to look at the low profile ones and i've having some serious doubt if it would fit... any other options? the thing i do now, is to raise the car with the spare tyre kit jack before using my jack to place the jack stands underneath..
You can go to Sears and spend $240 for a jack that starts under 3" and goes to over 19". Or you can get the same jack at Harbor Freight for $80 on sale.
 

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i have a normal jack that can't even fit underneath the car. i went to look at the low profile ones and i've having some serious doubt if it would fit... any other options? the thing i do now, is to raise the car with the spare tyre kit jack before using my jack to place the jack stands underneath..
Is 3½" low enough? That's a typical height for the lifting pad on a low-profile jack, and that's the height of the pad on the jack I use. With the OEM tires on the car, the pinch welds sit at 6¾", so there should be plenty of room unless the car is radically lowered.

When I want to lift the car high, I use the AC Hydraulics DK13HLQ, a very long, low-profile jack which also has a pad-height of 3½". The AC will lift the car nearly 30". More on that unit here: Pelican Parts.com - Low Profile High-Lift Floor Jack
 

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hmm. thanks. it never cross my mind to measure what the clearance is on the side. i should probably get to doing that. i only know it's slightly shorter than the height of a coke can.
 

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I had to get under there the other day and I have a trolley jack.

It took a few extra minutes, but the easiest solution I could come up with is to use the OE spare tire jack to raise the front driver's side so I had enough clearance to get underneath with my trolley jack. Once you're under, raise it up a little more with the trolley jack, take out the spare tire jack, pop in the jackstands and you're good to go.

I was only under the front, but I would imagine if you wanted to do all four corners up, it would be pretty easy to get the back up after you've got the front up first.

Getting it down was also a little bit of a pain as I had to raise up with the trolley jack, remove the jack stands, put the spare tire jack back in place, take out the trolley jack, and drop the car using the spare tire jack. It's an extra step in the process but for me it was worth spending the extra few minutes VS buying a special low-profile jack that I didn't already have.
 

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What do you guys think; is this legit? The guy is showing an example of how to use a jack and axle stands on a Mazda3. Anyone done it like this?...
 

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What do you guys think; is this legit? The guy is showing an example of how to use a jack and axle stands on a Mazda3. Anyone done it like this?...
Well for one thing he should be using pinch weld pads on the jack. If you watch closely, you can see that the jack is deforming the rockers when he raises the car using the bottom of the pinch weld.





The proper lift point is actually behind the pinch weld. The pad supports the car without crushing anything.




He has the axle saddles on the lower control arm pivot points. Maybe secure, maybe not. He doesn't really show exactly where they are.
A better solution is proper non-ratcheting stands (not axle stands, those are for old school solid axle cars) with pinch weld pads.

 

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Hi. I was looking underneath my Mazda 3, and I easily found the front lift jack point. But the rear... I'm struggling to know where exactly it is... I believe I might have an idea, but I need to be 100%sure lol.

Here is an image that displays where the rear lift point is....

I added the red... Is that where it is? Or is it the blue part that I colored?




 

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Look on the lower right blow up. The Jack point should be next to the exhaust and not on the control arm as you have indicated in red.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

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Look on the lower right blow up. The Jack point should be next to the exhaust and not on the control arm as you have indicated in red.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
Cool, thanks! So it's not the red part.... but is it the blue part?... or somewhere in between the red and blue? I'm aware of the right blow up pic, however, it's never been really clear to me:/
 

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Best advice is to grab a flashlight and take a good look under the. The piece you're looking for has a little pointy profile to it. That's your hack point. It's kind of far up in there, but it is there.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

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Look on the lower right blow up. The Jack point should be next to the exhaust and not on the control arm as you have indicated in red.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
Best advice is to grab a flashlight and take a good look under the. The piece you're looking for has a little pointy profile to it. That's your hack point. It's kind of far up in there, but it is there.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
Thank you kind sir:)
 

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What video? You can also use the pinch welds...
CK
There are a couple of options and a couple of issues to keep in mind as well as safety.

With the pinch welds, it is highly recommended that use one of the very rigid hockey puck style adapters or similar type pinch adapters or you will crush the point of lift...this is assuming you are using a hydraulic floor jack. The pinch welds on the new Mazda's are historically easy to crush if not lifted properly. The screw jack which comes with the car should really only be used for emergencies or last resort. Screw jacks are not what they use to be as they are of very low quality metals coming out of China and it is very likely the threads will strip after just a couple of lifts if it doesn't bend and fall over first....but the threads don't last long on the small Mazda jack...the smaller the screw jack the more likely it is to fail. You must be exact as well that the jack is completely straight before lifting. If you are lifting at the pinch welds without some type of pinch weld adapter, it is only a matter of time before you crush it.

My choice of lift is a bottle jack as I don't have the luxury or desire to store a lot of shop tools. If you just used a bottle jack without some type of pinch weld adapter you will crush the pinch welds. I found a heavy weight pinch weld adapter from a company called SafeJacks.com which works well. It fits over the top of the shaft (stroke). Their stuff is expensive, but they do specialize in jacks and accessories for a lot of situations. I actually keep the bottle jack in my car as I'm so afraid of the screw jack failing.

Of course once you get the car up then you need to add additional secure support.

I do agree, the lift points (not pinch welds) in the front of the car using a floor jack or even a bottle jack are easier to access and locate and get the car up than the back.
 

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I use a low profile Torin Jack's hydraulic jack and ESCO jack stands. I bought some generic hockey puck like pinch weld pads off of amazon too.

The jack stands are super safe and give you some piece of mind while you're under the car.

I have a hard time reaching the front lift point with my jack and usually lift up each side one at a time and set the jack stand.
CK
 

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I use a set of poly adapters from Ebay, they work very well. You can lift the whole side of the car if you place the jack under the front pinchweld point. I find bottle jacks can be a bit unstable though. I have a Harbor Freight floor jack like this.
I use the Esco stands with poly pads on them. The old style axle stands don't work real well for supporting on the pinch welds.




 
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