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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
"Stock/OEM" Wheel size, offset, weight, bolt pattern, lug nut info needed!

Situation: I just bought a 2014 mazda 3 ISV 4 Door Sedan, which comes with factory oem 16 x 6.5 steel wheels with hub caps that look horrendous and are extremely embarrassing >.<

Goal: I want to upsize my wheels to match the specs on the factory oem 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels that are standard on s models. I want to keep the offset the same as the factory oem 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels, but keep the weight the same as the factory oem 16 x 6.5 steel wheels in order to maintain the car's drivability. Specifically, I want aftermarket, black, aggressive, lightweight, 18" wheels, that sit flush with my car's fenders. Is this possible? (I was thinking 18 x 8.0 wheels, with the same offset as the factory oem 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels, which would make the wheel sit 0.5 inches (12.7 millimeters) closer to the fenders, thus, making the wheels 'flush'.

Problem: I don't know the offset and weight on the factory oem 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels or factory oem 16 x 6.5 steel wheels. I also don't know what the bolt pattern is and what type of lug nuts to buy. :sad 1:

Hypothesis: From what I can gather online, these are the specifications on the 2014 mazda 3:

1. Bolt Pattern = 5 x 114.3 mm.
2. Lug Nut = 12mm x 1.5 in. thread size, conical shape
3. OEM Wheel on i models = 16 x 6.5 in., ? offset, ? weight
4. OEM Wheel on s models = 18 x 7.0 in., ? offset, ? weight

Request: Can someone please fill in the ? 's?

PS. Any comments or concerns are fully welcomed :)

Thanks,
Justin
 

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I was under the impression that the 18" wheels are 18x7.5. Is that not correct?
 

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Making your wheel wider only puts the wheel width towards your shock/strut you need to change your offset for the to get flush with the fender. We have multiple threads on this but for Mazda3's below 2014 because the measurements could be different for how much fender room you have.

Here is a guide on measuring to see how much room you got and good info for everything below 2014s: http://mazda3revolution.com/forums/...s-tires/26833-mazda3-wheel-fitment-guide.html
 

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Simple answer get an enkei rpf1 just like @color0 who runs 18x9.5-10 and still gets 35-40 mpg.. if your not a fan of flushed wide then go with the stock 18x7.5 or 8.5 :D just like @razerer owns one of the sexiest simple stanced sedan ive seen (OT - dude i was drooling from the rear view of your car yesterday lol)


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Discussion Starter #6
Making your wheel wider only puts the wheel width towards your shock/strut you need to change your offset for the to get flush with the fender.

So you are saying if I swap out my 16 x 6 wheels with +50 offset (guessing the stock offset) for 16 x 10 wheels + 50 offset, then the extra 4 inches in width would ONLY go towards the shock/strut?

I don't think so... I think if the offset is the same, half of the width goes to backspacing (towards the strut), and half of the width goes to front spacing (towards the fender).

I did e-mail mazda, but they are not getting back to me :(
 

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I know most of us like bigger/wider wheels/tires. But I've upsized for the last time. On my last car, I had a +2 configuration with tires 30mm wider (close to the same diameter). It looked absolutely wonderful. The +2 wasn't bad, but I totaled the car as the wider tires hydroplaned. Unless you are never going to take your car out in the rain, I suggest the most you go with is what comes on the sGT. Thinner tires are always better in rain and snow unless the wider tires are specifically made for that in tread separation and rubber compound. It wasn't that I was going fast -- I was only going 15-20 mph. It was that the tires just wouldn't grip the road and it was like a slow motion crash that you could not avoid. No more extra wide tires for me...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Simple answer get an enkei rpf1 just like @color0 who runs 18x9.5-10 and still gets 35-40 mpg.. if your not a fan of flushed wide then go with the stock 18x7.5 or 8.5 :D just like @razerer owns one of the sexiest simple stanced sedan ive seen (OT - dude i was drooling from the rear view of your car yesterday lol)


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What's the difference between flush and flush wide?

I want to get OZ Ultraleggera (Black Painted) from tirerack.com. The site says they fit the 2014 mazda 3 sedan.
Offset: 48mm
Backspacing: 6.38"
Bolt Pattern: 5-114
Rec. Tire Size:215/45-18
Weight: 18.4lbs.

Does anyone know if OZ Ultraleggera will be a problem to install on a 2014 Mazda 3 ISV Sedan?

Will post pics after installing :)

I know most of us like bigger/wider wheels/tires. But I've upsized for the last time. On my last car, I had a +2 configuration with tires 30mm wider (close to the same diameter). It looked absolutely wonderful. The +2 wasn't bad, but I totaled the car as the wider tires hydroplaned. Unless you are never going to take your car out in the rain, I suggest the most you go with is what comes on the sGT. Thinner tires are always better in rain and snow unless the wider tires are specifically made for that in tread separation and rubber compound. It wasn't that I was going fast -- I was only going 15-20 mph. It was that the tires just wouldn't grip the road and it was like a slow motion crash that you could not avoid. No more extra wide tires for me...
You only upsized +2 in wheel diameter and +1 in wheel width (~30mm) and you ended up hydroplaning and crashing your car?!

Right now I have stock 16 x 6.5 steel wheels, and I want to upgrade + 2 in wheel diameter and +1 in wheel width. But I know the 2014 mazda 3 s models come with 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels. So technically, since both the i and s models have the same suspension, just different engines, I would technically only be updgrading +1 in wheel width. Do you think that will be a problem?

Thanks for the warning!
 

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What's the difference between flush and flush wide?

I want to get OZ Ultraleggera (Black Painted) from tirerack.com. The site says they fit the 2014 mazda 3 sedan.
Offset: 48mm
Backspacing: 6.38"
Bolt Pattern: 5-114
Rec. Tire Size:215/45-18
Weight: 18.4lbs.

Does anyone know if OZ Ultraleggera will be a problem to install on a 2014 Mazda 3 ISV Sedan?

Will post pics after installing :)



You only upsized +2 in wheel diameter and +1 in wheel width (~30mm) and you ended up hydroplaning and crashing your car?!

Right now I have stock 16 x 6.5 steel wheels, and I want to upgrade + 2 in wheel diameter and +1 in wheel width. But I know the 2014 mazda 3 s models come with 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels. So technically, since both the i and s models have the same suspension, just different engines, I would technically only be updgrading +1 in wheel width. Do you think that will be a problem?

Thanks for the warning!
The size ur trying to install is easy n will not cause u problems


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Right now I have stock 16 x 6.5 steel wheels, and I want to upgrade + 2 in wheel diameter and +1 in wheel width. But I know the 2014 mazda 3 s models come with 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels. So technically, since both the i and s models have the same suspension, just different engines, I would technically only be updgrading +1 in wheel width. Do you think that will be a problem?

Thanks for the warning!
From my perspective, the 215's are wide enough unless you are doing a rally on dry pavement. If you go with wider tires, I wouldn't let the tread wear down too much or they'll handle like slicks. Going to 225's theoretically should be OK. I had 275's on 19" rims on the Chrysler I totalled. OEM was 225's on 17's. That was way too much even though the diameter was about the same. Never again.
 

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So you are saying if I swap out my 16 x 6 wheels with +50 offset (guessing the stock offset) for 16 x 10 wheels + 50 offset, then the extra 4 inches in width would ONLY go towards the shock/strut?

I don't think so... I think if the offset is the same, half of the width goes to backspacing (towards the strut), and half of the width goes to front spacing (towards the fender).

I did e-mail mazda, but they are not getting back to me :(
What I mean to say is that using that high of an offset your wheel will hit your strut/stock before getting close to being flush with the fender.
 

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@jojoyoking Why don't to take one of your wheels off and look at what the offset is? It's cast into the hub or one of the spokes.l
 

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From my perspective, the 215's are wide enough unless you are doing a rally on dry pavement. If you go with wider tires, I wouldn't let the tread wear down too much or they'll handle like slicks. Going to 225's theoretically should be OK. I had 275's on 19" rims on the Chrysler I totalled. OEM was 225's on 17's. That was way too much even though the diameter was about the same. Never again.
Shit tires are a bigger factor than width. I run 255's all around and hydroplaning resistance is way better than the stock 205 bricks.

OP, The specs on the OZ's are more or less a safe fit but won't be flush. If you want flush you must lower your offset and/or increase width. The Wheel Fitment Guide has the only picture you'll ever need to understand wheel specs.
 
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What's the difference between flush and flush wide?

I want to get OZ Ultraleggera (Black Painted) from tirerack.com. The site says they fit the 2014 mazda 3 sedan.
Offset: 48mm
Backspacing: 6.38"
Bolt Pattern: 5-114
Rec. Tire Size:215/45-18
Weight: 18.4lbs.

Does anyone know if OZ Ultraleggera will be a problem to install on a 2014 Mazda 3 ISV Sedan?

Will post pics after installing :)



You only upsized +2 in wheel diameter and +1 in wheel width (~30mm) and you ended up hydroplaning and crashing your car?!

Right now I have stock 16 x 6.5 steel wheels, and I want to upgrade + 2 in wheel diameter and +1 in wheel width. But I know the 2014 mazda 3 s models come with 18 x 7.0 alloy wheels. So technically, since both the i and s models have the same suspension, just different engines, I would technically only be updgrading +1 in wheel width. Do you think that will be a problem?

Thanks for the warning!
Flush
1386964219658.jpg

Flushed wide (look at the rear )
1386964251930.jpg


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Shit tires are a bigger factor than width. I run 255's all around and hydroplaning resistance is way better than the stock 205 bricks.
Our car has 215's. I agree that tires make a big difference. However, as the wider tires wear, the grooves no longer hold as much water and hydroplaning increases dramatically as there is less pressure per square inch on the road. That's why drivers at road races change their tires so often. If you want to change your wider tires early, the you are probably right. But most of us let our tires wear down a bit more. It also depends on where you are located. If you live in the NE like me there are leaves and gravel on the roads as well. If you live in the SW where temps are warmer, then there is less risk with wider tires. No one wants bad tires and the Dunlops that come with the car are just average. If you replace the original tires with junk and don't spend the extra to buy good rubber, you're just dumb or you don't drive your car more than 15 mph.
 

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Our car has 215's. I agree that tires make a big difference. However, as the wider tires wear, the grooves no longer hold as much water and hydroplaning increases dramatically as there is less pressure per square inch on the road. That's why drivers at road races change their tires so often. If you want to change your wider tires early, the you are probably right. But most of us let our tires wear down a bit more. It also depends on where you are located. If you live in the NE like me there are leaves and gravel on the roads as well. If you live in the SW where temps are warmer, then there is less risk with wider tires. No one wants bad tires and the Dunlops that come with the car are just average. If you replace the original tires with junk and don't spend the extra to buy good rubber, you're just dumb or you don't drive your car more than 15 mph.
Sure enough color0 doesnt drive his car 15 mph on hairpins..... more likely between 70-90 mph :eek: yea lol

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Let's... not muddy up this thread with any potential debate. @rvoll, welcome to the forums, please do a background check on my posts and my build thread and we will not have to waste words. There's no need to educate me about the basics of tire selection and maintenance.
 
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Let's... not muddy up this thread with any potential debate. @rvoll, welcome to the forums, please do a background check on my posts and my build thread and we will not have to waste words. There's no need to educate me about the basics of tire selection and maintenance.
Well pardon me!!!!! I thought it was good to present various points of view for people on the forum to see. My mistake....

This is my first Mazda, but not my first car. I've owned Porsches for the last 27 years, been through gobs of driver training courses, skid pads, slaloms, etc. I guess I just have no real world experience at this.

Kidding aside, I've been through lots of tire testing, and while I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination, I've learned a few things over the years. First, unless you push tires to the limit or put them in extreme situations, there's not that much difference in everyday driving. I've been in Porsches modified for the track, and they are very different cars than most of us drive every day. You have special tires for dry, and wet, and cold, and drag, and I've tested all of them. You can't beat the laws of physics even with good rubber. Putting wide rubber on a car (increasing the contact patch), does affect the pounds per square inch. The wetter the pavement, the more pressure you want on the ground to push through the hydroplaning effect. That's why winter tires have much wider grooves as that increases the contact pressure. Even good rubber succombs to physics.

I've lived all over the U.S. -- all of the way from Minnesota to Dallas and Boston to LA -- and for everyday driving, there is not one good solution. When I lived in Dallas and LA, I wouldn't be without wider tires because it is warmer, dryer weather and that increased traction is welcome. However, I'd be a fool to put wide rubber on a daily driver in Minnesota and for that matter, the northeast.

I am not questioning your knowledge, but have a real difference of opinion based on decades of experience, different cars, and having lived all over. We all have different experiences -- I thought that's what forums were for -- to share them...
 
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Well pardon me!!!!! I thought it was good to present various points of view for people on the forum to see. My mistake....

This is my first Mazda, but not my first car. I've owned Porsches for the last 27 years, been through gobs of driver training courses, skid pads, slaloms, etc. I guess I just have no real world experience at this.

Kidding aside, I've been through lots of tire testing, and while I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination, I've learned a few things over the years. First, unless you push tires to the limit or put them in extreme situations, there's not that much difference in everyday driving. I've been in Porsches modified for the track, and they are very different cars than most of us drive every day. You have special tires for dry, and wet, and cold, and drag, and I've tested all of them. You can't beat the laws of physics even with good rubber. Putting wide rubber on a car (increasing the contact patch), does affect the pounds per square inch. The wetter the pavement, the more pressure you want on the ground to push through the hydroplaning effect. That's why winter tires have much wider grooves as that increases the contact pressure. Even good rubber succombs to physics.

I've lived all over the U.S. -- all of the way from Minnesota to Dallas and Boston to LA -- and for everyday driving, there is not one good solution. When I lived in Dallas and LA, I wouldn't be without wider tires because it is warmer, dryer weather and that increased traction is welcome. However, I'd be a fool to put wide rubber on a daily driver in Minnesota and for that matter, the northeast.

I am not questioning your knowledge, but have a real difference of opinion based on decades of experience, different cars, and having lived all over. We all have different experiences -- I thought that's what forums were for -- to share them...
Mmk, look dude. I interpreted your tone of voice incorrectly. I am not disagreeing that for the same tread design/compound rubber, narrower will cut a path through water or snow better than wider. However, you should go back through some of your physics and you'll find the surface area argument you make is actually wrong. Because that part is wrong, the rest of your wide-tire argument, while the result is consistent to life, is inaccurate as well. So I do not wish to allow misinformation to be spread on this forum, especially if it can be prevented by a simple math problem.

I would REALLY like to continue this conversation via PM or a new thread on tire physics. We are mucking up OP's thread.
 
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