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Hi guys, last week some moron sent me into the center median in my 2012 Mazda3 s Grand Touring, the insurance company told me it's totalled. Anyway while I wait for the check in the mail, I'm trying to decide on the next vehicle. I am particuarly interested in the 2016 s Grand Touring, with the large centered rpm gauge in the instrument cluster with the mph in digital (manual transmission).
There were plenty of "I wish I knew" moments about my 2012 like the grinding in 2nd gear, or the melting dash... So for you long term owners of the 2016 Mazda 3, what advice would you tell me as a potential buyer? What did you wish you knew?
Any help is appreciated...
 

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I can't speak for the 16, but I have a 15. A 16 would be very similar except that a lot of the small problems in mine would be solved. None of them would have changed my mind on buying it.

Only thing that comes to mind is I wish I had known about how the rear brake pads can seize and how to fix it. That's it. Everything else I have had has been very minor. Overall, this car has been very reliable and not too difficult to maintain.
 

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The big difference to me between the gen2 and gen3 cars is the seating position and the ingress/egress process. I'm not a young person (mid-50's), with bad knees. The gen3 car has the seats lower than in the gen2, which makes getting in and out a bit more of a challenge. Usually, you stick your right foot into the footwell first and slide your but into the seat, with your left knee supporting your weight while you slide behind the wheel. Hanging all my weight on my left knee and bending it down that far is no-bueno for my knees. I have to enter the car butt first, sit down, then swing my legs in. . But when I sit in the car this way, I found that my left hip grazes the b-pillar while my right hip grazes the steering wheel. I'm not fat (34" waist), but it feels like if I was any fatter I might get stuck and die of embarrassment. I'm also afraid that repeated scuffing the various clips in my pocket & belt (pocketknife, flashlight, etc) on the steering wheel will ruin the leather on the steering wheel. That said, once in the seat, the cabin was comfortable and visibility was fine. I only felt cramped getting in or out.

The gen2 car (a 2013 in this case) feels a bit more upright, with a higher bottom seat level. I have less issues sliding in or sitting down. The interior isn't as nice as the gen 3, but it works fine. The other difference for me was the gen3 gets better mileage. Both the 2013 gen2 and the 2015 gen3 were skyactive 2.0 with the 6-speed, so the only real difference is the body, but the 2015 regularly averaged 40mpg, while the 2013 is usually around 34mpg. But given my bad knees, I gladly trade the 6mpg for easier access to the driver's seat. If you're younger, with good knees, this probably means nothing, but if you're older, or heavier, or have a bad back or bad knees, it's something to consider.
 

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If you can swing it I would get an sGT.
I got an s Touring, it's nice but I would have really like the upgraded headlights and leather.

The mechanical hand brake is on 14-16, electronic after that.
The cup holders in the center suck, i think they fixed it on 17+
I'm not sure if the 16 is part of the infotainment screen recall, something to check.

Not much to say. I have been very satisfied with the vehicle. 92,000 miles just fluids, filters, brakes, and tires. I came from a 2003 Honda Accord and the Mazda meets all my needs.
 

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Watch out for the road noise especially on low profile tyres and check you are content with the noise level. Alloy whels are prone to corrode and suspension component corrosion protection is poor.
 

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Watch out for the road noise especially on low profile tyres and check you are content with the noise level. Alloy whels are prone to corrode and suspension component corrosion protection is poor.
Susp. component rust protection is non existent... and none of those cpts are castings .. they're steel pressings/fabrications.
 

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Susp. component rust protection is non existent... and none of those cpts are castings .. they're steel pressings/fabrications.
i've been undercoating since i got the car new so i haven't had any issues - is it really that bad? so far mine is immaculate.

one gripe i forgot about that i THINK may have been fixed with the 16 model year, if not then 17 is how the back of the front seats are shaped. seems fine until you try to put a rear facing child seat there. it's just not possible. i do know there was a revision to the seats to fix this, just not sure when. i had to put the child seat in the middle of the back seat and then we bought a second car. made damn sure those fit. brought the child seats to the dealer.
 

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i've been undercoating since i got the car new so i haven't had any issues - is it really that bad? so far mine is immaculate.
Somemore expensive cars have cast nodular iron, cast steel, or forged aluminum susp cpts... which generally are more corr. resistant. The fabricated steel pressings are in the same category as the subframes, i.e. susceptible to major corr. I forget the old-time protection methods... E-coat, phosphating... but I believe they are only lightly phosphated and painted these days. Me, I advocate scuffing 'em up and priming with red oxide, topcoating with a couple of coats of gloss enamel. But remember, I live in rainy, wet Vancouver... Southern climes, mebe less of an issue.

Few folks go to this trouble, obviously.
 

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Somemore expensive cars have cast nodular iron, cast steel, or forged aluminum susp cpts... which generally are more corr. resistant. The fabricated steel pressings are in the same category as the subframes, i.e. susceptible to major corr. I forget the old-time protection methods... E-coat, phosphating... but I believe they are only lightly phosphated and painted these days. Me, I advocate scuffing 'em up and priming with red oxide, topcoating with a couple of coats of gloss enamel. But remember, I live in rainy, wet Vancouver... Southern climes, mebe less of an issue.

Few folks go to this trouble, obviously.
sure, vancouver is awful for rust. ontario isn't good either, but i'd imagine with the ocean it's even worse for you.

all i have noticed was a poor paint job on the front A-arms. i cleaned them and sprayed them with the rubberized paint. rocker guard or some crap. works well.
 

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Actually, Mazda's seem to survive well in Vancouver. As for the bodies themselves (not the subframes or susp members)... and specifically the rear wheel lips on first gen Mazda3's - they tend not to have mega problems here. I compare that to Alberta, where a lot of sand and pebbles are used in wintertime road safety... they do have prbs there. In fact, based on what I saw here in Vancouver, I figured I could make a long-term "go" of a Mazda6 here in Vancouver... so I went ahead with my purchase. If I lived east of here, or in BC's Interior, I would not have bought a Mazda, for reasons of corr. protection. Don't get me wrong, they CAN be protected, for sure, but with some work, for sure, and diligent inspection at close interval (for stone chips, etc).

Having said all of the above, I think that Skyactiv body architecture (compared to non-Sky Mazda's) means thinner gauge sheet metal... and so extra diligence is nec.

YMMV, but these are my thoughts...
 

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Things I wish I knew before getting my 2016 Mz3 Sport GT :unsure:
  • paint is apparently thinner than my previous 2013
  • "performance" mods, and tuning is sparse compared to other manufacturers' models

Other than those points, I've been content with it.
Had mine since new, and was basically stock until last year; slowly beginning the upgrade to wheels, tires, brakes, springs and shocks, and rear sway bar.

Currently at 114,000 km, so about 70800 miles on the clock.
 

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Watch out for the road noise especially on low profile tyres and check you are content with the noise level. Alloy whels are prone to corrode and suspension component corrosion protection is poor.
Road noise was a major issue for me.
 

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I have a 2016 3S manual. I think the only thing that really annoys me is the slow infotainment. But once it boots up after 15 seconds or so, it's OK. Overall, feels like one of the best car purchases i've made. Reliable, fun, and aging well.
 

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Hi guys, last week some moron sent me into the center median in my 2012 Mazda3 s Grand Touring, the insurance company told me it's totalled. Anyway while I wait for the check in the mail, I'm trying to decide on the next vehicle. I am particuarly interested in the 2016 s Grand Touring, with the large centered rpm gauge in the instrument cluster with the mph in digital (manual transmission).
There were plenty of "I wish I knew" moments about my 2012 like the grinding in 2nd gear, or the melting dash... So for you long term owners of the 2016 Mazda 3, what advice would you tell me as a potential buyer? What did you wish you knew?
Any help is appreciated...
i'd go for the 2017 3 as new items and improvements were done:
Font Number Screenshot Document Circle
Rectangle Font Screenshot Parallel Number
Font Parallel Rectangle Number Screenshot
Rectangle Font Screenshot Parallel Number
Font Screenshot Number Parallel Document
 

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Road noise was a major issue for me.
Well, Mazda reviews frequently mention the noise level, but I did not realize before I bought mine just how loud it was. Ironically, this is the first car I've ever had with a premium factory sound system--and above ~40 mph, I can't really hear it.
 

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Well, Mazda reviews frequently mention the noise level, but I did not realize before I bought mine just how loud it was. Ironically, this is the first car I've ever had with a premium factory sound system--and above ~40 mph, I can't really hear it.
I had the exact same experience. The stereo performance was severely hindered by that road noise. The Bose stereo features that were meant to overcome cabin noise were no match for the road/tire noise.
 

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I have a 2016 Touring and the only thing that has been troublesome is the rearview camera likes to turn on 90% of the time. About 10% of the time, its just a blank screen. No rhyme or reason, and it always works at the shop. So the one thing I've memorized is resetting the infotainment system in my Mazda (Press and hold the Back button, the Nav button, and the Mute button for at least 10 seconds.) Also, the infotainment system is slow, so be patient with it.

The only other thing that bothers me is the lack of LED headlights and you can't simply buy aftermarket LED headlights either. My wife's 2012 Sienna was compatible with a pair of $50 LED's we got off of Amazon, but they simply don't work with the Mazda.
 

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I had a 2016 touring and now own a 2018 grand touring and would recommend you get a 2017 or 2018 instead. Except for losing the manual parking brake, they are a much better all around car.

For people that reference road noise or NVH and music related issues, adding noise deadening mats in the doors and hatch makes a big difference. I had it installed by a professional car audio shop for a few hundred. Well worth it.

It won't be as quiet as the gen 4s, but it will make your music much more enjoyable.
CK
 
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