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Hi,

So, I was impatient about letting my CS SRI filter dry completely after washing it. It was very dirty. I left it outside over night to dry, but it rained and I forgot it out there. I tried to dry it with paper towel in the morning before I reinstalled it. Had to get to work!

After driving a block, the power cut out (did not stall though), engine light came on and so did the traction control light. Both remain illuminated.
I pulled the code, but I forgot it already. It might have been P1608 Powertrain Control Module Test Fault . I popped the filter off and the MAF was a little wet. Crap! Would you expect this code from a wet MAF?

I plan to dry the filter completely and clean the MAF with electrical contact cleaner to purge it of moisture. Do you think that will be sufficient? Do you think it could be something else busted?

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1. Disconnect your negative battery terminal.
2. Disconnect the plug that clips into your MAF sensor.
3. Using a phillips head screwdriver, remove the two screws holding the MAF sensor to the air intake duct.
4. Remove your MAF sensor from the intake by pulling up and wiggling slightly. There's a rubber o-ring to seal it in there but it should pop out fairly easy.
5. Go to an auto parts store and buy a can MAF Sensor Cleaner.
6. Put the little straw attachment on the can so you can spray inside the sensor.

There are two things you want to clean on the MAF. Immediately on the outside, you will see something that almost looks like a Q-Tip. That is the temperature sensor for the intake. Make sure you clean that pretty well so its nice and shiny and an amber color. Mine was matte black from all the stuff stuck on it:mellow 1:

Next, if you look inside the actual air channels of the MAF, you'll see a few little exposed metal wires/contacts down in there. Be very careful with these, some people actually stick something down there to clean it, but I was weary of breaking it so I just shot the MAF cleaner down both air entries in either direction to make sure everything was clear. After doing this, simply give it a good shake to get out any excess fluid and then set it somewhere clean for like 5-10 minutes. It's really all you need if you bought the correct MAF cleaner, this stuff evaporates very quickly. I'll try and get you a pic or something of the can, although it should be very easy to find at any auto parts store.


After all this, simply pop the sensor back in, put the two screws back in, and reconnect the plug to the MAF sensor. Once everything is all set, you're ready to reconnect the battery's negative terminal and start up the car. Now just go out for a nice easy drive for a little while to re-learn the timing and fuel tables for your car's computer with CORRECT intake temperature readings and CORRECT airflow readings. WOOHOO!!!:yes:
 

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Usually, when the MAF sensor gets wet. The check engine light will turn on. On my old 3 that has a CAI, every time it rains or have my car washed. the filter gets wet and lil bit of water will get sucked in. this will wet the MAF sensor. usually once the sensor dries out, the ECU will eventually relearn it self and will clear the CEL light.
 
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