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I bought some Michelin Premier A/S v-rated a few months ago. I get this vibration at about 60-65 that's really prominent, can feel it in the seat and in the floor and in my body. It' basically just in that speed range. The dealership said they balanced the tires and wheels and that it was all good to go, so it's not a balance issue, they say. But they are also saying maybe it's a bent rim. Well, I just want to figure this out. I don't think that I have a bent rim, because I had no issues before I bought the new tires. Good tires, just the vibration...not sure what's going on. Any ideas? This is a 2009 2.3L Mazda3.
 

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Demon Spawn
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find somewhere in your area that does road force balancing, I had many vibration issues on my mazdas and im sure a lot of people with newer cars with bigger (17"+) rims and thin rubber band like tires that come on cars now do, as that very thin sidewall must be made very stiff and made to distribute the weight and load evenly so if you have even a slight imperfection its noticeable. road force balancing will tell you of its a bent rim or a tire, it can also allow them to do what is called "match mounting" where they take the lightest spot on the tire and align it to the heaviest spot on the rim (usually marked with a green dot or where they end up putting the valve stem hole or on cars with tpms it is usually the spot where the tpms sensor sets. road force balancing also adds in pressure as if the tire was driving on the road so its able to find these small imperfections better than a standard tire balancer. some tires the low and high spots are marked but some aren't. Michelin is usually good about marking them. from my experience with vibration issues like this on many cars and 2 mazdas I have come to realize the only way to get the lower profile tires ised these days to balance well is a good tech that knows the machine and balancing technique well and a road force balancer.
 

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If it's not a bent wheel or tire balance, you could also have your tie rods and ends checked. If the joints are worn they can get a little loose and allow vibration. Fortunately they're easy to check and usually not very expensive to replace. Replacing them also requires a new alignment too, but it's worth it.
 

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Demon Spawn
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If it's not a bent wheel or tire balance, you could also have your tie rods and ends checked. If the joints are worn they can get a little loose and allow vibration. Fortunately they're easy to check and usually not very expensive to replace. Replacing them also requires a new alignment too, but it's worth it.
it doesn't require an alignment after if your know how to count how many exact turns you used to take the old one off and put it back on that exact amount. I can get them within +/-.01 of the spec usually if I am good about remembering to count as I remove 0:)
 

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it doesn't require an alignment after if your know how to count how many exact turns you used to take the old one off and put it back on that exact amount. I can get them within +/-.01 of the spec usually if I am good about remembering to count as I remove 0:)
Yes, that is true. I did both sides on my old Corolla, then a few weeks later drove it 1800 miles moving from FL to CO. Perfectly centered, no vibration, no uneven tire wear. I was quite proud.

But it's VERY bad advice for someone with no experience. So I always recommend to get it checked/realigned if someone is doing it themselves. And If a shop does the work for them, the shop should be checking the alignment anyway to be sure they got it right.
 

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Demon Spawn
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Yes, that is true. I did both sides on my old Corolla, then a few weeks later drove it 1800 miles moving from FL to CO. Perfectly centered, no vibration, no uneven tire wear. I was quite proud.

But it's VERY bad advice for someone with no experience. So I always recommend to get it checked/realigned if someone is doing it themselves. And If a shop does the work for them, the shop should be checking the alignment anyway to be sure they got it right.
NO, I would not recommend someone without experience just assume they have theirs centered, good call
 
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