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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So recently I bought a 2004 Mazda 3 hatchback 2.3l automatic. Transmission was wierd when I got it. Had to baby it for it to switch gears just right and would stick in certain gears for a while acting like a manual until I came to a complete stop or what not.

replaced the transmission with another used transmission. Now when I hit 3rd gear it goes into limbo and acts like it’s in neutral revving to high rpms and reverse doesn’t work. It did pop a p0500 code for thevehicle speed sensor a. I need help lol please!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If your car has a TCM, I'd have a look at it. In fact I'd have looked at it before I changed the transmission.
If the car is a 2004 model it probably doesn't have a separate TCM. From what I have seen 2006 was the first year for that.
Since I think my tcm and ecm are a 2 in 1. Should I just replace that with another one?
 

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Since I think my tcm and ecm are a 2 in 1. Should I just replace that with another one?
Are you sure it controls the transmission? - note if it does you should be able to read fault codes. Swapping parts can be an expensive way of solving problems but I'd try it if I could get a good replacement unit cheaply.
 

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Since I think my tcm and ecm are a 2 in 1. Should I just replace that with another one?
You should do as arathol originally suggested and have the car properly diagnosed. Throwing parts at a vehicle, hoping to fix the problem, is a foolhardy and ex$pen$ive approach. You're going to feel really stupid if someone gets in there and discovers the problem was caused by a corroded connector or a broken ground wire. Modern vehicles are VERY susceptible to issues which corrupt the +/-5V potential needed for proper operation.
 

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You should do as arathol originally suggested and have the car properly diagnosed. Throwing parts at a vehicle, hoping to fix the problem, is a foolhardy and ex$pen$ive approach. You're going to feel really stupid if someone gets in there and discovers the problem was caused by a corroded connector or a broken ground wire. Modern vehicles are VERY susceptible to issues which corrupt the +/-5V potential needed for proper operation.
Try cleaning every electrical plug connected to the TCM , the transmission and the selector with contact cleaner and clean and remake every ground. As Gary suggested might solve your problem cheaply and quickly.
 
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