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I have a couple questions. I'm replacing my engine in my 2008 Mazda 3 2.3 L. My questions are, I'm replacing my 2.3L with a 2.5L. in order to take out just my engine ( left the transmission in the car) I took the crankshaft pulley/harmonic balancer off. And when putting in the new engine in I took off the crankshaft pulley/harmonic balancer to fit it. I was told that I pretty much just fucked himself when taking off the "pulley". Is that true? What do I need to know when putting back on the "pulley"? Also what do I need to change or take from the old motor for the change over?. Videos to explain these questions would be greatly appreciated

Ty ahead of time
 

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2013 Mazda 3 i Hatchback
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Okay, not sure of your experience level, so sorry if some of this is basic stuff.

First off, you didn't say what the donor engine is from. If it's from a Ford (which makes the engine a lot cheaper to buy), then there are more parts to change than if it came from a Mazda. It also sounds like you've already put the 2.5 into the car. If you've done that before asking or researching how to do the swap, I have bad news for you. You might have to pull that motor back out and swap a bunch of stuff. I'll let others that have done this swap chime in with a more detailed list. I know that there are discussion threads about doing 2.3 to 2.5 swaps on this site as well as others.

Here's some general advice on doing major repairs (especially when you haven't done that repair a bunch of times):
  • Buy a factory service manual. They're like $20 and will give you detailed procedures for everything you will need to do. It won't tell you what you'll need to move from the old motor to the new one, but it will tell you how to do each of the steps when you do swap a part. Best $20 you'll ever spend.
  • Research. Before undertaking any major project, I read several forum threads that discuss the details of how to do it, and any tricks that they learned along the way. I also watch a lot of videos from others that have already done it. Take notes, and make a list of any special tools that will be needed.
  • Checklists. Make sequential lists of the steps you need to do. In fact, on really big jobs, I've copy/pasted the service manual into a document, then edited to insert the notes & tricks I learned. That way I had a complete instruction manual of how to do the project. It takes time, but on a complicated job that you might not have done a bunch of times it's easy to miss something.
Preparation saves a lot of perspiration...
 
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