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2018 Mazda 3 Grand Touring
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Wow, the color contrast is striking (in a good way IMO)! Well done. Thanks for sharing the photos.

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Thanks! I wasn't sure at first with it being so bold.. but the contrast, like you said is striking..
Makes me want to go air ride system next year.
 

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235/40/18 on 18x9 offset 35 -- no rubbing on stock suspensions.

Do you think it will have issues if I try to lower it via lowering springs / coilovers?

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Yes. Roll / stretch your fenders and / or add some negative camber.
Thanks! This is helpful. This is my daily-drive, so not sure if a negative camber is advisable. I may need to change the wheels to a smaller witdth in the future. Perhaps an 18x8.

^This. Most likely have to pull all 4 corners depending on how low you go.
Looking at around a 1.5" drop from stock height. 4 fingers now and looking to do 2.
 

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Thanks! This is helpful. This is my daily-drive, so not sure if a negative camber is advisable. I may need to change the wheels to a smaller witdth in the future. Perhaps an 18x8.



Looking at around a 1.5" drop from stock height. 4 fingers now and looking to do 2.
My previous wheel setup was 19x8 +35 at about a 1.3" drop (Bilstein B14) and on the way back from getting the tires mounted, I hit a good dip on the freeway and it sliced a clean strip out of the sidewall of the rear tire. Had to do an emergency fender roll (with my floor jack handle) and drive right back to the tire shop (carefully) and luckily they had the same tire in stock (I had ordered mine from Tirerack.com).

While my wheels were an inch larger in diameter, your wheels are an inch wider and I would definitely recommend you get the fenders rolled before getting the wheels and tires put on.
 

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Thanks! This is helpful. This is my daily-drive, so not sure if a negative camber is advisable. I may need to change the wheels to a smaller witdth in the future. Perhaps an 18x8.
A couple degrees of camber won't hurt, in fact if done right it can only help....but adding camber is not as simple as turning an adjustment bolt. Expensive parts are needed....
 

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My previous wheel setup was 19x8 +35 at about a 1.3" drop (Bilstein B14) and on the way back from getting the tires mounted, I hit a good dip on the freeway and it sliced a clean strip out of the sidewall of the rear tire. Had to do an emergency fender roll (with my floor jack handle) and drive right back to the tire shop (carefully) and luckily they had the same tire in stock (I had ordered mine from Tirerack.com).

While my wheels were an inch larger in diameter, your wheels are an inch wider and I would definitely recommend you get the fenders rolled before getting the wheels and tires put on.
It is currently installed now on stock suspensions and dips on the highway are okay -- as well as occasional speed bumps (there are a lot here). Wheel gap at stock suspensions is a little less than 3 inches. Will definitely have fenders rolled.

Do you think this is too much poke?
 

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Do you think this is too much poke?
Yes. The rear fenders are a 90 degree bend inward from the fender's outer surface which pokes inward about 3/4" (just guestimating based on what I remember). When you lower the car, it will pull the wheel inward slightly (I will skip the diagrams of arc angles and lengthy explanation), however at your offset and width, it will most likely cut a nice groove in the sidewall of your tire.

First option: stretch narrower tires. Bad idea, unless you are into that mad hella flush nonsense.

Secong option: pull some additional negative camber. More costly but the parts you need to purchase will give you good adjustability to fine tune your alignment to maximize traction and/or minimize tire wear for daily driving.

Third option: roll / pull fenders. Use a fender rolling tool to crease that 90 degree flange upward and out of the way of your tires. Downside, if you don't take the time to do it right, you will crack your paint and expose your fender to rust which, over time, can look horrendous with bubbling paint and ultimately create holes in the sheet metal if not mitigated. The front fenders are actually bend upward as oem, but can still be rolled more to increase tire clearance. Pay a professional to do the job for you if you do not want to risk it yourself. Either way, be ready to seal any areas where paint cracks.
 

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Yes. The rear fenders are a 90 degree bend inward from the fender's outer surface which pokes inward about 3/4" (just guestimating based on what I remember). When you lower the car, it will pull the wheel inward slightly (I will skip the diagrams of arc angles and lengthy explanation), however at your offset and width, it will most likely cut a nice groove in the sidewall of your tire.

First option: stretch narrower tires. Bad idea, unless you are into that mad hella flush nonsense.

Secong option: pull some additional negative camber. More costly but the parts you need to purchase will give you good adjustability to fine tune your alignment to maximize traction and/or minimize tire wear for daily driving.

Third option: roll / pull fenders. Use a fender rolling tool to crease that 90 degree flange upward and out of the way of your tires. Downside, if you don't take the time to do it right, you will crack your paint and expose your fender to rust which, over time, can look horrendous with bubbling paint and ultimately create holes in the sheet metal if not mitigated. The front fenders are actually bend upward as oem, but can still be rolled more to increase tire clearance. Pay a professional to do the job for you if you do not want to risk it yourself. Either way, be ready to seal any areas where paint cracks.
Thank you for your reply. I saw that the fenders at the front are already rolled out of the factory.

4th option: I am looking to sell my 18x9 +35, and get an 18x8.5 +45. With the same 235/40/18 tire that I have now, I think this is enough to not have that rub -- what do you think? I am anxious in rolling fenders or touching any metal works of the car, so I'll take this L and get a new set of wheels.
 

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Thank you for your reply. I saw that the fenders at the front are already rolled out of the factory.

4th option: I am looking to sell my 18x9 +35, and get an 18x8.5 +45. With the same 235/40/18 tire that I have now, I think this is enough to not have that rub -- what do you think? I am anxious in rolling fenders or touching any metal works of the car, so I'll take this L and get a new set of wheels.
Just do it.


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Thank you for your reply. I saw that the fenders at the front are already rolled out of the factory.

4th option: I am looking to sell my 18x9 +35, and get an 18x8.5 +45. With the same 235/40/18 tire that I have now, I think this is enough to not have that rub -- what do you think? I am anxious in rolling fenders or touching any metal works of the car, so I'll take this L and get a new set of wheels.
I haven’t had that exact setup but I’ve had a couple different wheel setups on this car at various ride heights and I think you may still rub in the rear due to the 235 tire. Rolling is not that risky if you get someone experienced to do it correctly. I’ve done it many times myself without cracking any paint. If you have a heat gun, IR thermometer and take your time with a fender roller it should turn out well.


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