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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Edit: Here's the mazda press release -thanks to fellow members for providing - much clearer details - the supercharging will be a standard part of the SkyactivX engine, sounds like they will all use it.
http://www2.mazda.com/en/publicity/release/2017/201708/170808a.html

Features
This new proprietary combustion engine combines the advantages of gasoline and diesel engines to achieve outstanding environmental performance, power and acceleration performance.
Compression ignition and a supercharger fitted to improve fuel economy together deliver unprecedented engine response and increase torque 10-30 percent over the current SKYACTIV-G gasoline engine.*3
Compression ignition makes possible a super lean burn*4 that improves engine efficiency up to 20-30 percent over the current SKYACTIV-G, and from 35-45 percent over Mazda's 2008 gasoline engine of the same displacement. SKYACTIV-X even equals or exceeds the latest SKYACTIV-D diesel engine in fuel efficiency.
With high efficiency across a wide range of rpms and engine loads, the engine allows much more latitude in the selection of gear ratios, providing both superior fuel economy and driving performance.
Per Motorauthority.com - The Skyactiv-X (aka skyactiv-2) will use supercharging to further increase efficiency - i have to wonder if this is accurate reporting, but they have my interest....

This could be merged with the HCCI thread, but wanted to share this news which i think many will be excited about.


Mazda confirms HCCI engine for 2019

Mazda on Tuesday laid out a company-wide strategy that looks ahead to the year 2030.

Chief among the plans is the introduction of the world’s first production Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine.

Mazda says the technology will appear in 2019 in a next-generation Skyactiv-X engine, though no particular models were mentioned. The redesigned Mazda 3 is rumored to be the first recipient, however.

HCCI engines run on gasoline but rely on sparkless ignition via compression, like in diesel engines. Their efficiency comes from burning the mix of and air and fuel at lower temperatures, which ends up reducing much of the heat energy lost in a normal gasoline engine. Because of this efficiency, a much leaner air and fuel mix can be used. The process also produces much fewer emissions.

Mazda is talking 20-30 percent efficiency gains over its current engines. The automaker says its Skyactiv-X engine should also match or exceed the latest diesel engines when it comes to efficiency, but without many of the harmful emissions diesel engines produce.

The main problem with HCCI engines is the specific temperature needed for smooth operation. Too cold and it affects the performance of the ignition system. Too hot and you end up with engine knock. HCCI engines also tend to wear out faster. To get around the temperature problem, Mazda’s Skyactiv-X engine will be capable of conventional sparkplug ignition when necessary, such as during cold starts. Mazda calls the technology Spark Controlled Compression Ignition.

Mazda’s Skyactiv-X engine will also use supercharging for further efficiency gains. The automaker says the supercharger has the added benefit of increasing torque by 10-30 percent compared to the current engines.

Also announced in Mazda’s strategy, known as Sustainable Zoom-Zoom 2030, are plans to introduce electrified models, including electric cars, starting from 2019. Mazda says its electric cars will initially be offered in areas that restrict certain vehicles to reduce air pollution or use a high ratio of clean energy for power generation. The latter is part of Mazda’s goal of reducing “well-to-wheel” carbon dioxide emissions to 50 percent of 2010 levels by 2030 and to just 10 percent by 2050.

The strategy isn't all about efficiency, though. Mazda said it will also look to introduce more safety-aimed electronic driver aids to reduce the number of accidents. The automaker is also looking at self-driving technology which it hopes to have available in some form by 2025.
 

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Anybody with a supercharger will tell you it does nothing positive for fuel economy....I run a Kenne Bell blower on a 4.7L Grand Cherokee and it does naught for mpg but gotdang does it improve spg (smiles per gallon)
 

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I'm guessing that the supercharger plays a role in making the hcci setup work better, maybe over a wider load range and the benefit outweighs the fuel economy lost from using a supercharger

Who knows, maybe they will start using e-turbos and a 48v pack somewhere to provide boost instead of engine driven

The mellenia car was before my time but that was supercharged and I think ran a different cycle for better economy. Miller cycle I think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah there was another article posted somewhere that made it sound like all the HCCI models would use the supercharger...which doesnt sound promising for a high performance variant...unless mazda just said screw it, lets make every car we build really zoom zoom.

Ill be curious to hear details laid out...this engine is pretty exciting given its "first ever" tech...really interests me.
 

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Yeah there was another article posted somewhere that made it sound like all the HCCI models would use the supercharger...which doesnt sound promising for a high performance variant...unless mazda just said screw it, lets make every car we build really zoom zoom.

Ill be curious to hear details laid out...this engine is pretty exciting given its "first ever" tech...really interests me.
So far I haven't seen any reference to actual engine size. The other option would be a very small displacement engine, say around 1 or 1.5 liter, with a supercharger - a small engine with the power of a larger engine and good fuel usage numbers. One Mazda has already gone this route as the Fiat 124, using a turbo charged 1.4l inline 4 in place of the SkyActiv motor usually found in the MX-5. The small turbo motor has been the trend for a while now in Europe it seems. However, while these smaller engines may get better gas mileage and are more efficient etc in testing, it seems that emissions from these motors are quite high in real world use and don't even come close to meeting current standards. Given the claims made by Mazda, it will be interesting to see the difference between laboratory testing and the real world.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah there was another article posted somewhere that made it sound like all the HCCI models would use the supercharger...which doesnt sound promising for a high performance variant...unless mazda just said screw it, lets make every car we build really zoom zoom.

Ill be curious to hear details laid out...this engine is pretty exciting given its "first ever" tech...really interests me.
So far I haven't seen any reference to actual engine size. The other option would be a very small displacement engine, say around 1 or 1.5 liter, with a supercharger - a small engine with the power of a larger engine and good fuel usage numbers. One Mazda has already gone this route as the Fiat 124, using a turbo charged 1.4l inline 4 in place of the SkyActiv motor usually found in the MX-5. The small turbo motor has been the trend for a while now in Europe it seems. However, while these smaller engines may get better gas mileage and are more efficient etc in testing, it seems that emissions from these motors are quite high in real world use and don't even come close to meeting current standards. Given the claims made by Mazda, it will be interesting to see the difference between laboratory testing and the real world.
Agreed if they are doing HCCI + Supercharging across the line up is does seem likely we'll get 1.0 or 1.5 liter engines. I guess the good news is that if they make a 2.0 or 2.5 even it could be a powerful unit. I know the ms3 is not likely, but the 6, even cx-5 make sense to offer near 300hp if mazda is truly wanting to compete with premium brands.
 

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Here's another intersting article about this conversion to the HCCI engines.

AutoWeek said:
"A proprietary combustion method called Spark Controlled Compression Ignition overcomes two issues that had impeded commercialization of compression ignition gasoline engines: maximizing the zone in which compression ignition is possible and achieving a seamless transition between compression ignition and spark ignition," the automaker said in a statement.

Mazda's design will still use spark plugs to achieve ignition under certain conditions such as low temperatures, but it has indicated that all other issues pertaining to this design have been successfully solved, with the company touting the "super lean burn" characteristics of this new powerplant. The engine is expected to be 20 to 30 percent more efficient than its current SKYACTIV-G family of engines, and an impressive 35 to 45 percent more efficient than the automaker's own 2008 engine with the same displacement. Mazda's compression gasoline engine is promised to deliver 10 to 30 percent greater torque numbers than SKYACTIV-G engines, with Mazda planning to pair the new design with a supercharger. In addition, Mazda says that this new type of of engine will permit much more latitude in selecting gear ratios, which will benefit fuel economy.
Mazda compression ignition engine breakthrough promises cars with HCCI tech in 2019
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah seems like each article is making their own conclusions or maybe some are just more comprehensive. Would love to hear what mazda themselves are going to tell us here soon at the various shows mentioned.

One article i read (wired.com i believe) was saying controlling the boost (have read turbo and supercharging from different articles) is actually one of the ways they are controlling the ignition event, so again points to forced induction being an integral part of the skyactiv X engine.
 

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About a year ago I read that the compression ratio for the HCCI would be about 18:1, and normally aspirated. The dynamic compression ratio varies due to temperature, variable valve timing control of air charge, and fuel added.
 

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Anyone know if the Mazda HCCI would take diesel or gas? I find it interesting that many of the articles I read don't specify.
 

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It's using pressure to get diesel-like compression detonation with gasoline. All HCCI engine concepts are like that. The question I have is whether it will require premium octane gasoline?

Here's a pretty good video describing how it most likely works (since Mazda is quiet on the details):
https://youtu.be/9KhzMGbQXmY
 

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So if they're making these new hcci engines with superchargers or at least optional...it should be fairly easy to modify it for a little more boost/power instead of fuel economy.

Granted, tuning the ecu is going to be an ass and the supercharger may be very limited in it's output, but I feel like it would be very possible. Some good things were done with tuning the current skyactiv after all.
 

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Looking forward to future Mazda motor improvements. They will come at some point.

However, if all of us had $1 for every media prediction that turned out wrong, this would a forum of all millionaires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Looking forward to future Mazda motor improvements. They will come at some point.

However, if all of us had $1 for every media prediction that turned out wrong, this would a forum of all millionaires.
We should get the proper reveal from mazda this coming month (if the media predictions are correct, that is) - i'm looking forward to hearing some hard facts about these engines.
 

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It's using pressure to get diesel-like compression detonation with gasoline. All HCCI engine concepts are like that. The question I have is whether it will require premium octane gasoline?
I wonder about that...and whether they will still offer manuals. We're really thinking about holding out for one of these, rather than a 2018 3 GT.
 

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I called Mazda today and asked them if I could one of their, on-road beta-testers for the new motor. I committed that I would put 30,000 real-world miles on it within a year, in all different parts of the country -- especially road trip miles.

Did not get the response I was hoping for.
 
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