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Discussion Starter #1
OK I give. What size of socket do you need to get the plugs out of the 2.0L?

I have a 16mm, too big. Jimmied up a 14mm that seemed to fit my replacements. Even measured the replacements, 14mm. Doesn't fit the plugs in the car.

Man Mazda really likes using some oddball sizes. Changed the gear oil thinking it was 22mm....nope too small. OK must be 24mm....nope it's 23. Couldn't pick a standard size could they.
 

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Did you try any of the SAE sizes? 16mm is the same as 5/8, so maybe 9/16?
A 15/16 wrench should work on a 23mm bolt too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah I don't have any imperial plug sockets....just never needed them on Asian cars.

I have some SAE wrenches but not many. Nothing that big. Plus I'm a stickler for torque specs. Can't use the torque wrench with a box wrench.
 

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I did spark plugs and it was DEFINITELY either 16mm or 14mm. I wanna say 14. It was super weird and I have never seen that on an Asian car but that's what worked perfect for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I ended up ordering a 9/16 and 14mm plug sockets off Amazon. Can't find these in a store here. It'll get done one way or another :)
 

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You have to be using deep socket if you are doing spark plugs with a normal (non-spark plug specific) socket. Seems obvious but I don't know how 14mm wouldn't fit yours.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not sure either. Felt like it was going in OK,but just seemed to spin. Old beaten up socket. Not sure what went wrong really.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got a nice 14mm magnetic spark plug socket off Amazon, arrived couple days ago. Guess what? Worked great. Just finished changing out the plugs, fun 2am job :)

I think my ghetto socket was the problem for sure. I couldn't find my magnet tool so I pulled the rubber part out of the 16mm plug socket and jammed it into a 14mm 6 point deep impact socket....I think there just wasn't enough room for the plug end to fit.

It was worth a shot i guess. Either way, the Amazon socket was worth every penny. They're not so easy to find in stores around here.
 

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*The Electrician*
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How many miles(KM's) should one be going before changing our spark plugs? Also, you guys going with OEM's or aftermarket? I figure with all the idling I do changing mine at 30,000km is probably not a bad option, what does you guys think?

Also, is it coil on plug or just the wire/plug?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
How many miles(KM's) should one be going before changing our spark plugs? Also, you guys going with OEM's or aftermarket? I figure with all the idling I do changing mine at 30,000km is probably not a bad option, what does you guys think?

Also, is it coil on plug or just the wire/plug?
As per the maintenance schedule in the owner's manual, change interval is 120k kms. 30k is way too early and completely unnecessary. Our cars spec iridium plugs only. Iridium has an extremely long service life. I did mine at 100k just to get it early and I can say that they could have likely gone far beyond 120k.

Even with copper plugs in my old car I used to clean them with a brass wire brush and regap them to get a similar lifeapan.

Keep in mind that you cannot do this with iridium. You'd risk breaking the fine electrode tip or worse yet have it break inside your engine.

I chose NGK laser iridium plugs. Check their website for the part #. If you live in Canada like I do, you may have trouble getting your hands on these. They're not commonly stocked in stores around here, at least where I live. I bought a pack of 4 off Amazon for a good price. And yes iridium plugs don't come cheap. The 14mm socket was also an Amazon item as well. Stores only seem to stock the standard 16mm and 18mm plug sockets.

Our cars use coil on plug so there's no wires to replace.when you end up doing this job, I recommend applying a light coating of anti-seize lubricant to the plug threads and dielectric grease to the coil end of the plugs. This will prevent the plugs from seizing in the head and coils from seizing on the plug. Always do this job when the engine is stone cold. Torque specs are in the maintenance manual which is available on these forums. My 3/8" drive medium sized torque wrench was perfect for this job.
 

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Haha very funny you guys. Next you'll tell me I should refill my headlight fluid.
But seriously, I meant the ignition coils (zero_g says it right in their post and somehow I still brain fart). Is that a "use it until it breaks" kinda part?
 

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No need to refill, but check it regularly.....make sure you use the right formulation


But really, I don't think there is a schedule for replacing the coils, but 100k is a good number. That being said, I have a Ford Expedition with 175k on it and the COPs are still good.
 

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Got a nice 14mm magnetic spark plug socket off Amazon, arrived couple days ago. Guess what? Worked great. Just finished changing out the plugs, fun 2am job :)

I think my ghetto socket was the problem for sure. I couldn't find my magnet tool so I pulled the rubber part out of the 16mm plug socket and jammed it into a 14mm 6 point deep impact socket....I think there just wasn't enough room for the plug end to fit.

It was worth a shot i guess. Either way, the Amazon socket was worth every penny. They're not so easy to find in stores around here.
Cool
Good to know
 

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As per the maintenance schedule in the owner's manual, change interval is 120k kms. 30k is way too early and completely unnecessary. Our cars spec iridium plugs only. Iridium has an extremely long service life. I did mine at 100k just to get it early and I can say that they could have likely gone far beyond 120k.

Even with copper plugs in my old car I used to clean them with a brass wire brush and regap them to get a similar lifeapan.

Keep in mind that you cannot do this with iridium. You'd risk breaking the fine electrode tip or worse yet have it break inside your engine.

I chose NGK laser iridium plugs. Check their website for the part #. If you live in Canada like I do, you may have trouble getting your hands on these. They're not commonly stocked in stores around here, at least where I live. I bought a pack of 4 off Amazon for a good price. And yes iridium plugs don't come cheap. The 14mm socket was also an Amazon item as well. Stores only seem to stock the standard 16mm and 18mm plug sockets.

Our cars use coil on plug so there's no wires to replace.when you end up doing this job, I recommend applying a light coating of anti-seize lubricant to the plug threads and dielectric grease to the coil end of the plugs. This will prevent the plugs from seizing in the head and coils from seizing on the plug. Always do this job when the engine is stone cold. Torque specs are in the maintenance manual which is available on these forums. My 3/8" drive medium sized torque wrench was perfect for this job.
I have used those but this latest i was speaking to NGK tech rep and he got to try Ruthenium HX.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I have used those but this latest i was speaking to NGK tech rep and he got to try Ruthenium HX.
I'm curious how long these last over the iridium plugs. If it's significantly longer (like 200k kms) I'd be down just for less maintenance. I'm not sold on the efficiency part. Sure it may be a more efficient plug, but history has taught us that the real world difference is usually almost nothing. Let's face it, often copper plugs do the job just fine. They don't last though. Where the more advanced plugs help is exotic applications. Our engines having a higher than normal compression ratio or a turbo charged motor are good examples. Probably why we're specd with iridium from factory. I'd be very surprised to see any tangible results over iridium with these. Lifespan however..... didn't see a mileage estimate on the link.
 

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I'm curious how long these last over the iridium plugs. If it's significantly longer (like 200k kms) I'd be down just for less maintenance. I'm not sold on the efficiency part. Sure it may be a more efficient plug, but history has taught us that the real world difference is usually almost nothing. Let's face it, often copper plugs do the job just fine. They don't last though. Where the more advanced plugs help is exotic applications. Our engines having a higher than normal compression ratio or a turbo charged motor are good examples. Probably why we're specd with iridium from factory. I'd be very surprised to see any tangible results over iridium with these. Lifespan however..... didn't see a mileage estimate on the link.
If this helps.... I originally asked (my 2.0L has some engine mods) which of their Race spark plug i can use the 2.0L . They came back asked to list what i did to the 2.0L
Thats when they suggested the HX which have a higher heat value / or run colder / ....bottom line better in a high compression engine thats revving high all the time
like the 2.0L in the mx5 ... So theory is if they can run at a higher temp with extreme load. Running them at regular laod put less stress on them.. longer lasting.
But... (disclaimer) ...i would still stick to mazda recommended interval. I could assume that alot/some/most of their data is from Global MX5 cup 2.0L racing.
 
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