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I don't see any problem there...:dunno:

If you mean that little bit of surface rust on the center of the rotor, it happens to all of them. If it really bothers you pull them off, clean them and paint them with high temp spray paint.
 

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The Adventure Mazda
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Every time it rains I'm always surprised at how bad the rotors look with rust spots. Its just the type of metal that it is.
 

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Every time it rains I'm always surprised at how bad the rotors look with rust spots. Its just the type of cheap metal that it is.
Fixed it for you.:smile2:
In all reality, good replacement rotors don't rust that fast. OEM rotors are crap. My mx5 sat all winter without moving. No rust at all on the aftermarket replacement rotors. The OEM rotors on the 3 however will show lots of rust spots after 2 days.....:surprise:
 

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Hello everyone. Im new to the forum. Has anyone had this rust issue on the rotors/brakes? How do I get rid of this? Any solution to get it done without removing the wheels? Please Advise. Thank you.
I have the same issue as well. As other members have stated the rotors are made of cheap metal and also the OEM High Temperature paint applied sucks.

What I do every once in a while, is that I take WD-40 and I scrub the rust out of the rotor (I would recommend a metal brush too but this perhaps might require taking the wheel off). This will keep your rotor looking clean but eventually when there will be cold weather it will start to rust again.

As other members have pointed out the best solution is to paint the rotors with High Temperature Paint, but IMO is not worth it to get the tires off and spray just for an "Aesthetic" problem.

As far that I know this rust does not affect the performance of your cars or brakes.

Here is a picture of my rotors:
 

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Bump! I Went to my local dealership, they told me that the rust is "normal" on these kind of brakes, this issue will always re-appear cleaning after cleaning. I asked if it's possible to clean it or do something, they were "nope", so my question is, what is the proper method to cleaning the rust myself?

Funny Anecdote: After explaining my "rust" issue to the agent at the dealership, he tells me "This happens to every car, is this your first car " (Sarcastic mood) and I am "Yes, this is my first car..." (Serious mood) ---> Weird Silence lol
 

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High temp paint will prevent rust if painted correctly, also don't spray WD-40 on your brake rotors, calipers or pads its an oil based lubricant not a cleaner use brake clean instead.
Once oxidation begins its hard to stop. You can clean off the surface rust but its really hard to get it all. You can paint over it but in time the oxidation will probably bubble up through.
WD-40 is not an "oil based lubricant". Its a hydrocarbon based water dispersant / rust inhibitor. The primary ingredient is Stoddards Solvent, which is very similar to high grade kerosene. It works very well when used to prevent surface rust and is an excellent degreaser / cleaner. However, don't put it on brakes. If it gets on the pads they can be damaged, and it may soften the rubber components of your brake system.
Brake clean doesn't really remove rust as its designed to clean brake dust and other gunk off your brakes. Unlike WD-40, it won't damage your pads either.
 

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Once oxidation begins its hard to stop. You can clean off the surface rust but its really hard to get it all. You can paint over it but in time the oxidation will probably bubble up through.
WD-40 is not an "oil based lubricant". Its a hydrocarbon based water dispersant / rust inhibitor. The primary ingredient is Stoddards Solvent, which is very similar to high grade kerosene. It works very well when used to prevent surface rust and is an excellent degreaser / cleaner. However, don't put it on brakes. If it gets on the pads they can be damaged, and it may soften the rubber components of your brake system.
Brake clean doesn't really remove rust as its designed to clean brake dust and other gunk off your brakes. Unlike WD-40, it won't damage your pads either.
I didn't mean it was solely a lubricant but based on the "1001 uses" it is a lubricant and a penetrating oil with a petroleum oil base.
The hydrocarbon/solvent flashes away leaving the oil which inhibits rust.

A wire brush alone will remove rust, brake clean will clean them off as using water will make them rust pretty much instantly.

Due to what I thought was odd questions from inexperienced car owners I didn't want to over explain unnecessarily, but I'm assuming you agree WD-40 is NOT something to use on your cars braking system, brake clean is the safest "cleaner" to clean your brake system with and any water or moisture exposure to unpainted rotors will make them rust faster.
 

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I didn't mean it was solely a lubricant but based on the "1001 uses" it is a lubricant and a penetrating oil with a petroleum oil base.
The hydrocarbon/solvent flashes away leaving the oil which inhibits rust.

A wire brush alone will remove rust, brake clean will clean them off as using water will make them rust pretty much instantly.

Due to what I thought was odd questions from inexperienced car owners I didn't want to over explain unnecessarily, but I'm assuming you agree WD-40 is NOT something to use on your cars braking system, brake clean is the safest "cleaner" to clean your brake system with and any water or moisture exposure to unpainted rotors will make them rust faster.
Its not really a good lubricant when compared to real lubricating products, despite the 1001 uses thing it is no better at lubrication than kerosene or diesel fuel. It actually really sucks as a penetrating oil compared to the real stuff like Kroil.
Flushing the rust with a lingering petroleum solvent is a bad thing if you want to paint. Paint and Stoddard solvent don't mix well.
A wire brush will remove visible surface rust but oxidation remains below the surface and will return no matter what unless you remove every bit of oxidized material, which is hardly likely. Freshly exposed steel should be thoroughly cleaned, degreased and painted as soon possible to minimize oxidation under the paint.
 

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Its not really a good lubricant when compared to real lubricating products, despite the 1001 uses thing it is no better at lubrication than kerosene or diesel fuel. It actually really sucks as a penetrating oil compared to the real stuff like Kroil.
Flushing the rust with a lingering petroleum solvent is a bad thing if you want to paint. Paint and Stoddard solvent don't mix well.
A wire brush will remove visible surface rust but oxidation remains below the surface and will return no matter what unless you remove every bit of oxidized material, which is hardly likely. Freshly exposed steel should be thoroughly cleaned, degreased and painted as soon possible to minimize oxidation under the paint.
I'm not sure what the point you're trying to make is or if you misunderstood what I've said or if i'm misunderstanding you but you seem to keep going further off topic.
The performance of WD-40's lubrication, penetration, water displacement or solvent properties vs other products isn't the issue or topic as its marketed as a jack of all trades and is technically all of them. I only pointed out the misuse of it being used on a braking system and advised against it.

Stoddard solvent is called mineral turpentine in Australia or just plain old paint thinner and it mixes extremely well with oil paint in fact most oil paints require it for thinning and surface prep it all depends on the type of paint.
Now since no one has asked for any of this information or asked "how" it seems pretty irrelevant with us going back and forth with increasingly complex mostly repeating replies to questions that again no one has asked, don't take any of this the wrong way I agree with most of what you're saying and as an Australian we tend to be pretty straight forward ask a simple questions get a simple answer.

If someone was to ask how to fix the surface rust on their rotors well it would probably be something along the lines of: Remove rotor from car, scrub rust off with wire brush, clean/wipe rotor with "insert cleaner/solvent name"(methylated spirits is usually good for anything), mask off areas you don't want painted then paint them. It would be the same instructions for almost any paint and is usually on the back of the paint can and it would still be the best method for the at home DIY rusty rotor spray job you could do for next to nothing.
Alternative is to buy higher quality rotors/factory painted, DBA rotors is what we have in Australia Black, Gold or EN-shield.
 

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Regardless of what it is, you don't want any slippery residue on your pads or rotors and you never want to paint a rotor surface. Surface rust on rotors doesn't hamper brake performance and after a couple turns, it gets "cleaned" by the pads.

If there's issue with rust on the calipers (which also doesn't hamper brake performance), they can be removed and treated (paint or other rust protection). As for painting floating calipers, they look like crap to begin with and painting just makes their inherent ugliness that much more obvious (IMO)
 
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