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Discussion Starter #1
Firstly, this story just solidifies my belief in changing one's own oil. Changing it yourself... getting on the ground and inspecting your car. This periodic inspection likely saved me a costly repair bill down the road.

Here goes:
I bought my 2017 Touring 2.5 hatchback (manual transmission) new back in Aug 2017.

I did my first oil change at 5k miles. I noticed a small drop of oil on the underside of the plastic tray. Barely noticeable, especially on the black plastic. But this was my first oil change and I was admiring my shiny new car... from beneath. Upon seeing this oil drop, a knot formed in my stomach! My brand new girl was bleeding!? This cannot be! I proceeded to take the entire plastic under-tray off the car and saw this:


Ugh!!! :frown2:
I looked around under the car and noticed a little oil between the transmission and the engine.
_

_



If this were an older car, I would have suspected the rear main seal. But this is a shiny new car (with only 5,000 miles)... no way the seal is leaking. I immediately scheduled a dealer appointment. They inspected the car, cleaned off all the oil and let it run / drove it for a bit. They saw no evidence of a leak. They told me they couldn't find any leak, and weren't sure where the oil came from... suggested maybe it was spilled on the engine during the first oil fill (I was VERY skeptical of this... but took them at their word). Note: I am very skeptical in general, hence the photos I took from the onset. I also took photos after they cleaned the engine... and I took more photos during my 2nd oil change (at 10,000 miles); I wanted documentation of all of this in case of a warranty dispute.

That brings us to my 2nd oil change (10,000 miles). I had planned to inspect the car at 7-8k miles, but never had the time. Anyway, an already long story short... the leak was back... it was real... and the dealer finally diagnosed it as a rear main seal. Crazy! I talked to the mechanic, asking why would it be leaking so early... he guessed it was installed poorly.

Anyway, the moral of this story is: inspect your car once in a while. I change my own oil, in part to force me to get under the car and look for things like this. If I took this to an oil change place they likely would never have noticed... and I may have gone a couple of years without knowing about the leak (it is such a small leak, not enough to drip on the ground).

I'd be interested to hear if anyone else has had this issue.
 

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I do my own work for the same reasons. Shops only care about getting you in and out as fast as possible. The more cars they service, the more money they make.

My dealer is one of the better ones supposedly and those morons couldn't handle bleeding brake calipers last time I was there.

You did a really good job with this one. The quality checks you're doing saved yourself a lot of headache down the road.
 

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Bummer to have a leak on a brand new vehicle, but super kudos for finding it. Taking pictures was very, very smart.

Next new vehicle I get I'm doing all the work on it from the very beginning. This post is inspiring.
 

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I always am sad when on forum I always read a member saying that shops don't care!!

Naturally my response is going to be biased but at the same time defending a comment like that would be the same many of you would do if your chosen profession and education was constantly targeted.
I have spent the better part of my adult life in the Automotive Industry. If it were in sales or service the most important thing is CUSTOMER SERVICE!!! I think that most of you that deal with people in any capacity can agree with that. The next thing is the art of keeping a person returning to you for future needs. This goes back to customer service. Even a Dentist of Dog Groomer wants you to come back for them if anything to get your money. Dealerships and independent service shops are the same way. I understand the mentality and "group" theory that we all are out to slam dunk you and to get you in and do a service and out the door as fast as possible but it just is not so. Not only are there governing agencies that restrict and regulate how we do business it goes back to the customer service and the building of a customers base for future income.

That said the last time I look (a few years ago ) in education (schooling) and tools to do my trader over the years I have invested close to and over ONE HUNDRED THIRTY THOUSAND ($130,000) DOLLARS. That's is a lot of oil changes to break even.

The Service Shop I work at , several friends that own service and specialty service shops all take care of their customers and nothing leaves without a thoroughly checking the work performed, a test drive and re inspection, and a complete written explanation of the work performed and any and all parts replaced and a discussion with the customer about all the work performed and anything that may need future attention.

Besides in California most of that is under the governing regulation of the DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS BUREAU OF AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR. Some of us also are members of The Better Business Bureau.

So all I have to recomend is when you shop for a Automotive Service Shop use your common sence. First always look for ASE certification . We like to show these off because we needed to be current with the latest service procedures of new vehicles and needing to pay to take the test. Next go on line and read reviews from people that used them. Find someone that will take the time to talk to you about your concerns and not just shove a release authorization for you to sign and say they will call you later. Ask questions about the service needing to be done. Quality shops always will talk to you and try to explain in the best possible easy to understand way what they think and what they will be doing to resolve a problem with your vehicle.
Once you do these thing you will have the foundation of building a report with that shop that you will be able to feel confident that whatever your service needs are you will get the best possible service.


As for the OP and the oil leak...document what you have seen and go to the dealership for your warranty coverage.
I suggest as soon as you can before the oil leak continued to make more of a mess on your clean engine. I do recomend that when that repair the leak that you do your own engine cleaning or take it to a detail shop that offers engine and chassis cleaning and detailing. Most dealership are not set up for that kind of service and will only wipe or maybe a light pressure wash which may not really get it super clean again.
 

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I do my own work for the same reasons. Shops only care about getting you in and out as fast as possible. The more cars they service, the more money they make.

My dealer is one of the better ones supposedly and those morons couldn't handle bleeding brake calipers last time I was there.
This.
Around here flat rate rules, doing it quick as possible. If the book says its 2 hours and $200, then get it done in an hour and move to the next one. Shops don't care as long as there are people who will shell out the money without objection.
Many so-called "techs" are clueless regardless of what "certification" they claim to have or how many fancy expensive Snap-On toolboxes are lined up in the shop. I have in the past had to actually go out into the bay and tell a couple of them what the problem was and how to fix it..:surprise:
 

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As a reference to new engine and questionable oil leaks. My first oil change while I was looking at thing I saw this on the water pump?? I thought the same thing OMFG an oil leak on a brand new engine with less than 3000 miles WTH?? I looked around and could not see where it was coming from. So I did the natural thing and re-torqued every thing I could reach as per the service guide recommend torque values. Wiped the oil off and waited. At 5000 miles when I did my second oil change there was NO sign of the oil? So I still do not know where the oil came from but at this time my oil phantom has gone away?

20180323_104304.jpg

20180323_104347.jpg
 

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I always am sad when on forum I always read a member saying that shops don't care!!

Naturally my response is going to be biased but at the same time defending a comment like that would be the same many of you would do if your chosen profession and education was constantly targeted.
I have spent the better part of my adult life in the Automotive Industry. If it were in sales or service the most important thing is CUSTOMER SERVICE!!! I think that most of you that deal with people in any capacity can agree with that. The next thing is the art of keeping a person returning to you for future needs. This goes back to customer service. Even a Dentist of Dog Groomer wants you to come back for them if anything to get your money. Dealerships and independent service shops are the same way. I understand the mentality and "group" theory that we all are out to slam dunk you and to get you in and do a service and out the door as fast as possible but it just is not so. Not only are there governing agencies that restrict and regulate how we do business it goes back to the customer service and the building of a customers base for future income.

That said the last time I look (a few years ago ) in education (schooling) and tools to do my trader over the years I have invested close to and over ONE HUNDRED THIRTY THOUSAND ($130,000) DOLLARS. That's is a lot of oil changes to break even.

The Service Shop I work at , several friends that own service and specialty service shops all take care of their customers and nothing leaves without a thoroughly checking the work performed, a test drive and re inspection, and a complete written explanation of the work performed and any and all parts replaced and a discussion with the customer about all the work performed and anything that may need future attention.

Besides in California most of that is under the governing regulation of the DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS BUREAU OF AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR. Some of us also are members of The Better Business Bureau.

So all I have to recomend is when you shop for a Automotive Service Shop use your common sence. First always look for ASE certification . We like to show these off because we needed to be current with the latest service procedures of new vehicles and needing to pay to take the test. Next go on line and read reviews from people that used them. Find someone that will take the time to talk to you about your concerns and not just shove a release authorization for you to sign and say they will call you later. Ask questions about the service needing to be done. Quality shops always will talk to you and try to explain in the best possible easy to understand way what they think and what they will be doing to resolve a problem with your vehicle.
Once you do these thing you will have the foundation of building a report with that shop that you will be able to feel confident that whatever your service needs are you will get the best possible service.


As for the OP and the oil leak...document what you have seen and go to the dealership for your warranty coverage.
I suggest as soon as you can before the oil leak continued to make more of a mess on your clean engine. I do recomend that when that repair the leak that you do your own engine cleaning or take it to a detail shop that offers engine and chassis cleaning and detailing. Most dealership are not set up for that kind of service and will only wipe or maybe a light pressure wash which may not really get it super clean again.
I'll amend my previous post by saying most shops don't care. I've encountered a couple that do good work. 3 is all I can think of off the top of my head, but there are definitely good ones out there.

You obviously take a lot of pride in your profession, as do I. For that you have my respect. I believe that leading by example is the most effective way to bring change.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Update (NOT rear main seal)

Update:
I meant to post last week, but have been busy. I took my car to the dealer for repair (at this time, they assumed it was the rear main seal). The next day I get a call... after removing the transmission they see the rear main seal is NOT leaking. But rather, the leak is coming from "the upper oil pan." I've not heard this term before, but from what I surmise the upper oil pan is basically the lower half of the cylinder block (see pics). The red arrows in the pics below show the location of the leak. This was leaking into the bell housing and out from there... that's why dealer (and myself) assumed a rear main seal... as that is a likely cause.

Bottom line: the nature of the leak would require a major engine tear down. Mazda agreed a new engine was in order. Yep, I got a new long block. :surprise: I'm still shocked that this engine leaked from day one (well, I noticed it at 5,000 miles, I assume it leaked from day 1). But I will also say that Mazda stepped up and did the right thing. The dealer was nothing but helpful and provided a loaner for the 10 days or so it took. Just a reminder to inspect your car periodically!

cut-away view:



exploded view:
 

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Rotating your own tires also serves the same purpose. Glad the dealership stepped up and hope the teardown and reassembly goes just as well and doesn't lead to any other issues down the road.

My worst shop story was the drive pulley breaking off my immaculate 1991 Nissan 300zx turbo conv with 185K miles. The shop ordered a new engine and in the meantime, unbeknownst to me in an effort to save time, they pulled and dismantled the old engine with parts all over their floor. Unfortunately, when the engine arrived they realized they did not order a turbo and could not find one. After several weeks of renting a car and doing nothing to fix, they finally decided they could not fix and refused to reassemble the engine. Got the California Bureau of Automotive Repair involved which were very helpful and attentive in setting up my case, but still had to take the shop to court to recoup the several thousand dollar loss.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Rotating your own tires also serves the same purpose. Glad the dealership stepped up and hope the teardown and reassembly goes just as well and doesn't lead to any other issues down the road.

Engine was already replaced. I have a few hundred miles on it. So far so good. I did notice a tear in the intake boot; I called the dealer and they are replacing it. Other than that, all seems well (fingers crossed).
 

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As a reference to new engine and questionable oil leaks. My first oil change while I was looking at thing I saw this on the water pump?? I thought the same thing OMFG an oil leak on a brand new engine with less than 3000 miles WTH?? I looked around and could not see where it was coming from. So I did the natural thing and re-torqued every thing I could reach as per the service guide recommend torque values. Wiped the oil off and waited. At 5000 miles when I did my second oil change there was NO sign of the oil? So I still do not know where the oil came from but at this time my oil phantom has gone away?

View attachment 243202

View attachment 243210
Hey, I'm having this same exact issue with oil beading up under the oil pump. Exactly which bolts did you torque down to resolve on your end? Thank you.
 

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Next oil change, I will pull the entire plastic cover (pain in the ass by the way) instead of the handy small access panel where the plug and filter are. I always scan under my engines with a flashlight. My 13 year old Sequoia has oil near the tranny and I figure that it is the rear main, but I'm just going to monitor that one. On my brand new 18' 2.4 GT... It better be bone dry everywhere! I will come unglued if I discover the same thing - and I'm going to look for it in that exact spot. Doing your own oil allows you to not only know that the job was done right but also to discover unpleasant surprises like this. Great thread - inspirational.
 

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Next oil change, I will pull the entire plastic cover (pain in the ass by the way) instead of the handy small access panel where the plug and filter are. I always scan under my engines with a flashlight. My 13 year old Sequoia has oil near the tranny and I figure that it is the rear main, but I'm just going to monitor that one. On my brand new 18' 2.4 GT... It better be bone dry everywhere! I will come unglued if I discover the same thing - and I'm going to look for it in that exact spot. Doing your own oil allows you to not only know that the job was done right but also to discover unpleasant surprises like this. Great thread - inspirational.
Oh yeah, it's a right pain in the ass to pull all that plastic. I do it once a year to undercoat before winter. Without that plastic, I could do the job in 20 minutes. Removing and reinstalling stretches the job to over 2 hours.
 

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Oh yeah, it's a right pain in the ass to pull all that plastic. I do it once a year to undercoat before winter. Without that plastic, I could do the job in 20 minutes. Removing and reinstalling stretches the job to over 2 hours.
Cmon it's not that bad, I pulled mine to swap my rear motor mount, it sucked yes lol, but it wasn't that bad.
 

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About 10 minutes off and maybe 15 back on. Just the oil plug small plastic cover is about 2 minutes off and 2 minutes on tops. Not due for a while on my next change. Will be sure to follow up if I find anything at all.
 

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Keep in mind that I'm referring to pulling ALL the plastic. In all honesty, I don't find removal so bad. It's putting it back together after undercoating that I find painful. Probably partly because I don't have a hoist so I'm doing it in the driveway on jack stands.

Most of my time goes into trying to line everything up when I put it back together.
 

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Man, thank you for posting this!

I was changing my wife's oil this morning. 2018, manual, 2.5 and discovered this. Quick google and found your thread. This is the identical leak in the exact same location. We have 13k on the car. Heading in to dealer to see what they can get done.

How has the motor performed since the new long block was put in?
 

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I wonder if a leak like this (i.e. the OP's leak... between upper block and main bearing girdle) would make its way onto the clutch facing (if the car is a manual)....?

Right-on, BTW, re servicing your own car (if at all possible, and if you have time) - and getting underneath it once in a while. For me, I HAVE TO "commune" with my cars, for the simple reason that if I look at the main components from underneath, I often am able to determine, prior to it happening, which are going to "go south". I'm talking about half-shafts, wheel bearings, brakes (wheel cylinders, calipers, brake hoses, master cylinder, etc.).

Also, are the tire treads feathering or wearing abnormally (alignment, inflation); are the inside sidewalls damaged?

Many reasons to put on coveralls and slide under a car on ramps or on stout jackstands.

The other important thing is to pay attention, of course, to noises and to the feel of the car... as these also, often, tell you that things are changing... Then determine what or why.

I have to laugh, when I tell people that I don't, typically, listen to the sound system; rather, I listen to the car... (I find that entertaining and informative).
 

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New long block is a rare repair for these cars. But sometimes factory defects just get through. My own finally got fixed around 27k, and they replaced the computer, injectors, Cats, and exhaust manifold to finally fix an exhaust leak.
 
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