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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Fam,

So I was a knuckle-head and didn't disconnect the negative terminal from the battery while I was installing the HID relay to the battery. I was tired and had a long day at work. ( no excuse )

I am ok! Thank goodness. However I dropped a ratchet on the battery and unfortunately the ratchet landed on the pos terminal and touched this piece below.

Burnt a hole and I need to replace it.

First off what is this piece? Where might I be able to pick that piece up? There is no damage if I keep driving with it covered right? (Covered currently with aluminum foil)
If this part is expensive, what could I do to repair it?

For the future to any of you. DONT BE DUMB AND BE ME. Disconnect your negative terminal before working on anything with the battery.

Thanks,
-G
 

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Is anything leaking from there? By looking at it, there must be a fluid running through. Probably coolant for the the coupe heater.
 

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i agree

that's on the coolant line...i think

best not run the car til fixed

or run it, with the internal heater turned on, and confirm by watching the coolant leak out (don't stand too close - it'll likely be hot and under pressure)
 

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Don't do a second DUMB thing. Take that picture to a qualified Mazda mechanic and find out what it really is. Then take his/her advice on what to do next!
 

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that's just a big banjo bolt fitting, probably not too expensive. In a pinch, on a car I wasn't too worried about (which I would not say of my MZ3) you might get away with disconnecting that attached rubber hose and slipping another piece of hose of the same inner diameter over the puncture and securing it on both ends with hose clamps, then reattaching the original hose. That would be fine if the part was prohibitively expensive, but banjo bolt fittings ought not to be too expensive.

covering it with aluminum foil isn't going to do anything to hold the fluid in, though. Best to find out what it is and how much it would cost to replace/repair before going with my "rigged" fix and certainly before driving it any longer. If it's coolant, you do NOT want to be losing it while driving. Aluminum blocks do not take well to being overheated
 

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I believe that is the vacuum line going to the vacuum pump (the metal thing the banjo fitting is attached to)... this is for braking assist (provides vacuum for the brake booster). I think you could take this pic to the dealer and get a replacement. Installation should be simple.
 

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I believe that is the vacuum line going to the vacuum pump (the metal thing the banjo fitting is attached to)... this is for braking assist (provides vacuum for the brake booster). I think you could take this pic to the dealer and get a replacement. Installation should be simple.
That was my thought too. It'll be an easy fix for sure.

I can think of a few ways to repair that....but I'll be quiet. I'd try a fix on my own, but it would be hard to tell someone else to do it knowing that I'm doing a half assed fix
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everybody!! Much appreciated.

Sick find on the picture LiX.
Yeah indeed it is a big vacuum line...
 

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If this is a hole in a metal housing that is used to contain vacuum, I'd get a tube of JB Weld (two-part epoxy), cut a small piece of thin-gauge tin or aluminum to fit over the hole, and use the epoxy to secure the cut piece of metal over the hole to ensure it is leak-free

If that shade-tree-mechanic technique doesn't work, then I'd replace the broken piece. In fact, if it's a cheap piece that is easily replaced, that's really the route I'd take.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If this is a hole in a metal housing that is used to contain vacuum, I'd get a tube of JB Weld (two-part epoxy), cut a small piece of thin-gauge tin or aluminum to fit over the hole, and use the epoxy to secure the cut piece of metal over the hole to ensure it is leak-free

If that shade-tree-mechanic technique doesn't work, then I'd replace the broken piece. In fact, if it's a cheap piece that is easily replaced, that's really the route I'd take.
Yeah I am asking around to see how much it is to replace just that part. I am hoping nothing expensive also. but maybe temporarily seal it would be wise.

Thanks!!
 

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Did you try the JB Weld? It is supposed to hold high pressure and temperatures. Using the foil patch to keep goop out of the line while it cures is a great idea.
 
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