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On OV's tuning page they say that the 230 figure is on only 4.5 lbs of boost. They are at that number to make it 100% reliable but it's possible to add more boost as they haven't reached any breaking point yet. I think this is still new and untested but this could make our car's on pace with a Focus st if the price is right.
 

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It's cool that they're developing this product. Glad to see that they're utilizing an EFR turbo with all the cool technical features that come along with it e.g. better bearings, low inertia turbine, etc.

I would love to see development of a full throttle electric supercharger kit specific for the current skyactiv 3 similar to the Phantom SC kit for the FRS / BRZ crowd. Would be awesome to have both turbo and ESC kits offered in parallel!
 

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Greg - you may be interested in reading up on the development of the FRS / BRZ ESC kit. The developer used a pressure transducer between the throttle body and the compressor to control the compressor to "assist" the engine at part throttle conditions. Very neat innovation and probably the tip of the iceberg on what's to come.

I come from a long line of turbo and twin turbo cars, so take my opinion as you will. I love turbos as much as the next guy. Im not sure if linear is a word I would use to describe the output. My hope is that a well sorted ESC can deliver a lot of the gains from forced induction, but with way less invasiveness.

I propose that for street applications, a well developed ESC could please a very large audience for the ease of installation, tightness and "tune-ability" of control, power gains per $, and minimal-to-no impact on fuel economy and N/A engine characteristics.
 

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I agree with Nateness you have that flipped. Nothing linear about turbo charging. The point of a supercharger is to be always there and since it is driven off the engine it is more linear by design.
 

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I dunno, I find that turbo is a bit more linear in throttle response than a supercharger which I've found is much like instant boost the moment you get into the throttle. My turbo's have always been a bit easier to control on the throttle. But I've never had a twin turbo so maybe that's a little different than the subbie and volvo turbos I'm used to.
 

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I find modern cars with OEM turbos have a very flat torque curve with minimum turbo lag. In some cases, they state their torque over a range, eg. 200lbft torque from 1800rpm to 5000 rpm. Look at any GTI torque curve, it's quite flat, which results in linear power delivery. However, the Mazdaspeed 3 was anything but linear with a Jekyll and Hyde type behavior. I guess it depends on the car, but the newer turbos have a flatter torque curve, and I'm sure the future Mazdaspeed 3 will too. If you're talking about an aftermarket turbo, it will depend on the size, boost, how you choose to tune it, and the power delivery of the existing engine.
 

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@gregersonke
I think mine and @Nateness reply was with regards to your description of a Turbo being "linear". It is not, but I don't think you are using the right word to describe it "linear" isn't the correct term. Maybe you mean "gradual", based on your reply. Yes, turbo's tend to be more gradual then a supercharger in terms of power delivery.
 

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@gregersonke
I think mine and @Nateness reply was with regards to your description of a Turbo being "linear". It is not, but I don't think you are using the right word to describe it "linear" isn't the correct term. Maybe you mean "gradual", based on your reply. Yes, turbo's tend to be more gradual then a supercharger in terms of power delivery.
I was referring to linear in a control method, aka when I push on the throttle, I have much greater control over the amount of force being applied to the wheels.
 

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Just as Gregersonke said. Newer turbo motors are more linear and smooth than older car that are turbo which gives that boost feeling. Take for example a Volvo T6. The turbo are very smooth and you don't get that random almost inconsistent power surge. The engine almost feels like driving a diesel engine. Readily available power in the low end with no lag.
 

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Perhaps 230 may be optimistic. However, how much power is really an open-ended question. 2.0L vs 2.5L (different heads will show up on top end power numbers) matters greatly. Compressor type (Phantom has two versions, the largest one being 400 CFM at ~4 kW motor power) also is a substantial variable. With time and development, different compressor and motor options may become available.

From my limited background reading various threads, it seems like there are two main development platforms that are really pushing the envelope of this technology: 1) BRZ/FRS and 2) Miata NC. To a lesser degree, the Miata ND has only very recently begun development and I anticipate that substantial development and progress will be made over the next year of tinkering.

BRZ/FRS has shown ~220-ish WHP with stock block and head. Miata NC has a very interesting control system called the "Procede" that obsoletes the gas throttle switch and fully maps the ECU throttle position, load, etc. to modulate the ESC at part-load conditions.

Would be fun to see if OV or any of the other Mazda tuners develop a kit for the Mazda 3. Hopefully in parallel with conventional turbo options. More options is a good thing!

 

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Don't mean to derail this thread but I have been seeing what BBR has been doing with the MX5 2.0 Skyactiv and it's impressive. I know that it has a higher compression ration and runs on Euro premium but the results look promising.

Mazda MX-5 tuned by BBR to 200bhp | Evo

BBR unveils engine and chassis tuning program for 1.5 and 2.0-litre MX-5/Miata ND : BBR GTi
Keep in mind that all of BBRs dyno results are in BHP, which is closer to crank hp. They do have a 190 bhp package for the Mazda 3, but that requires you to buy their header, intake system and tune. Its basically the same power you get from an OV tune combined with a SRI. The Miata makes around 10 hp more tuned than a Mazda 3 (seen from many tuners) since it has an upgraded stock exhaust cam. Typically, tuned Miata's make power till 6500-7000 rpms, whereas Mazda 3's stop making power around 6000 rpm because of the limiting exhaust cam.

We won't likely see much more than ~200 hp (crank) on the Mazda 3 skyactiv 2.0 with just bolt-ons and a tune. In addition to the limiting cams, the intake and exhaust ports are very small to maximize low-end torque. Based on flow testing, the cylinder head flows half as much as a Honda Civic SI K20 engine. A turbo or supercharger would be the least expensive way to get well over 200 hp. The Miata electric supercharger thread posted above showed 175 whp preliminary results with an electric supercharger & before cam tuning. So around 200 whp or around 230 crank hp with just an electric supercharger is acheivable.
 

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OVT

Cliff hanger on their FB news.

Mz tunes under $500
@3:34pm "Stay tuned as we release our 2.5 Skyactiv Turbo Dyno Results!"
 
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