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Simply put, it doesn't. The fuel does not touch the intake valves, period. Their chemicals are no better than putting injector cleaner in your fuel tank. Even that, by the way, is fairly useless as well. If the fuel full of cleaners isn't hitting the valves how would it clean them?

Unless you live in an area with substandard fuel, the pump gas already has detergents in it. You can put more in but what's the point? Its a lot like putting extra detergent in your washing machine when your clothes are already coming out clean.

Search Google for top tier fuel. This is not premium fuel.
I was careful to say fuel induction cleaning which is a different beast entirely than injector cleaning. In induction cleaning the chemicals are added at the intake and soak the backs of the valves. It's certainly less invasive than spending a hot afternoon tearing an engine apart. Kind of like doing opening up someone's abdomen to treat indigestion when an antacid might do the trick, eh? I just wanted to know if anyone with actual knowledge of the process has laid eyes on how effective it is. There's the marketing, sure. But I was hoping for other verification.

https://seafoamsales.com/sea-foam-case-studies-gdi-revival/

https://www.knowyourparts.com/technical-resources/chemicals/gdi-engines-carbon-buildup/

 

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Why not disconnect the crankcase tube and let it vent to atmosphere (but put a small filter at end).

I realize its there to control pollution but let be honest, modern passenger cars are the least of the problem. I had to do this on my new motorcycle...
 

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Why not disconnect the crankcase tube and let it vent to atmosphere (but put a small filter at end).

I realize its there to control pollution but let be honest, modern passenger cars are the least of the problem. I had to do this on my new motorcycle...
A, its illegal, and B, doing that just might turn the CEL on.
 

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I did this a few years ago to my MB SLK- they have monstrous problems with their air metering system and oil contamination. The idea is to make the breather look discrete and original, and keep the old parts for when you sell the car or for the annual test - if they do that in your neck of the woods.
 

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IMO, that is a HUGE amount of oil to be coming out of your pcv system. How much oil does your car use between oil changes? I use to have to top off 3MOE with about a 1/2 quart of oil between oil changes, UNTIL I switched Mazda dealer service departments. I found a service department that uses Castrol oil, instead of some off brand oil that comes in a barrel. Now, I have zero oil consumption between oil changes.

oil


This is what the catch can collected after 1000 miles. About 20cc of oil/fluid which would have otherwise end up in the intake valves.
 

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IMO, that is a HUGE amount of oil to be coming out of your pcv system. How much oil does your car use between oil changes? I use to have to top off 3MOE with about a 1/2 quart of oil between oil changes, UNTIL I switched Mazda dealer service departments. I found a service department that uses Castrol oil, instead of some off brand oil that comes in a barrel. Now, I have zero oil consumption between oil changes.

oil
Is it all oil though ? Most of the can content pictures I have seen are more water from condensation than oil, so 20cc doesn't seem that bad...
 

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Is it all oil though ? Most of the can content pictures I have seen are more water from condensation than oil, so 20cc doesn't seem that bad...
Yeah I have to agree, that doesn't seem like much when you consider that half of it or more is just water.

Even with a catch can, we can't expect zero oil in the intake. I do find it interesting that switching oil made a big difference in oil consumption. I wouldn't have expected that. I wonder if they were using the correct oil weight? Idle curiosity.

I've always used nothing but castrol synthetic from the day I bought the car and mine doesn't go through any oil between changes. It might not be the best oil out there, but it seems to do the job well.
 

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I agree, IF it is that much water in there.

Yes, I was very concerned with 3MOE using that much oil between oil changes. The service order lists the oil as SAE0W-20 DILMAR SYN API SN, but you never know for sure. I changed the oil myself once, using Castrol, and I didn't have to add any oil between oil changes. So that added to the reason why I changed dealer service departments.

Yeah I have to agree, that doesn't seem like much when you consider that half of it or more is just water.

Even with a catch can, we can't expect zero oil in the intake. I do find it interesting that switching oil made a big difference in oil consumption. I wouldn't have expected that. I wonder if they were using the correct oil weight? Idle curiosity.

I've always used nothing but castrol synthetic from the day I bought the car and mine doesn't go through any oil between changes. It might not be the best oil out there, but it seems to do the job well.
 

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Wow! Mileage improving from 25mpg before cleaning to 38mpg after cleaning is absolutely astounding!

I've got almost 40000 miles on my 2.0 Mazda, almost all of it driving on the highway. I have a lifetime average of about 44mpg, and I have not observed any decline in mileage from new to now. So, I apparently do not have any significant carbon build up at this point.

By recording my mileage on the Fuelly site each fill-up, I'll easily spot any significant degradation as time goes on. That's the reason I bother to record fuel mileage: it keeps me informed of any problems that might develop that can affect fuel efficiency.

And if/when my mileage drops significantly like nostalgichero's did, I'll certainly get those valves checked as my first priority. But for me, so far, so good, without an oil catcher or valve cleaning.

I wonder if anyone has actually proven that the oil catcher makes any significant improvement in valve cleanliness and engine performance?

I get a little put off by posts like this ^^^, considering that the EPA rating on the 3rd Gen Mazda 3 is only 40 MPG (Sedan) on the highway, and those tests are done with pure gasoline (and no Ethanol), and under ideal conditions. And that's for the 2.0 engine. Some people actually expect you believe they've done this ^^^ with the 2.5, which is ridiculous.

I simply cannot believe that figure (44 MPG AVG) at 40,000 miles, unless you travel on the highway downhill, both to AND from. Obviously, you have to do SOME city (or in-town) driving, and when you mix that into the equation, it makes me think you must also have a tailwind all the time, when you are out on that magical highway you drive on.

That being said, of course a person can obtain very high numbers on a particular drive, like starting at a higher elevation, driving on flat or gentle downward slope the whole trip, etc... But driving that SAME route back to the starting point, will yield a lower MPG. And mixing any stop and go into the equation will also diminish the MPG.

So... 44 MPG lifetime average?

So tell me... How do you manage to obtain 4 miles per gallon more than the EPA estimate (Sedan), which is made under ideal conditions, using pure gasoline, and in perfect weather? Especially since that EPA figure is STRICTLY non-stop highway, with no city mixed in?

I'm just curious, because I cannot do anything like that no matter HOW hard I try.

On certain particular drives? Yes. But 44 MPG average? Over 40,000 miles? Nowhere even near that. And I drive mostly highway, too. I have around 33 MPG lifetime average, at 36,000 miles. And I'm a light foot on the pedal, intentionally.

Do you have a hamster on a wheel added to your power train?
 

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I think its silly that so many people get hung up on advertised numbers and just flat out ignore the reality that is right in front of them. If you had bothered for one minute to do some real world research, you would have found that many 3rd gen 2.0 car owners report 40+ mpg on a regular basis. Other owners however report sub-40 mpg on a regular basis. For some reason some cars seem to do better than others. Tire choice can make a difference. The crappy OEM low rolling resistance tires vs high performance summer tires can make for a several mpg drop it seems. These cars have known issues with sticking brake calipers that can cause a considerable drop in mpg if gone unnoticed. Choice of transmission can make a difference as the auto will automatically pick an appropriate gear for conditions and mileage may suffer as a result, whereas you can hold a manual car in a gear that gives better mileage. These cars seems to get better mileage if you don't baby them. My car gets better numbers in 5th at 80 mph than it does in 6th at 60. go figure. Then again, even with the state of tune on my 2.0 (approximately 185 hp), the current average as of yesterday ~27 mpg, around town for the most part. Thats mostly driving in the 3k-7k rpm range, and using 5th gear on the highway more than 6th. :cool: On longer highway jaunts 34 + is possible. If you are only getting 33 mpg with a stock tuned 2.0 intentionally trying to get high numbers, there is a problem there somewhere. Maybe you are just trying too hard....This engine runs more efficiently with an open throttle than it does just dawdling along.
And by the way, the same applies pretty much to the 2.5 engine. No reason you can't get at least close to 40 mpg without trying.
 

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The EPA rating of cars with manual transmissions corresponds to the EPA test formula for when to shift gears. In the real world, depending on road slope and other factors, usually we do NOT drive that way - and in fact, shift gears much sooner (yielding better than EPA results) with manual transmissions. For example, in my '17 Mazda6 6MT, on a downslope, I start in 2nd gear and I will often shift directly to 4th gear (obviously missing 1st and 3rd). My extremely close ratio 'box (except for the first to second gear ratio change) conspires to make the reported EPA mileage worse. When I skip gears it turns my 'box, effectively, from a CR 'box to the WR (Wide Ratio) 'box... and WR 'boxes are proven to get better gas mileage.

I am not saying all should start in 2nd gear and miss the intermediate gears, too, but what I am saying is that EPA stated values are higher rates of fuel consumption than is typical in the real world.
 

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DallasStarr, no reason to get upset. I'm not lying about my mileage. There's no reason to.

The reason I get the mileage I do is the fact that I use my Mazda3 almost exclusively on the highway. Indeed, I bought this car as a dedicated long-distance commuter for a round-trip of about 375 to 400 miles, almost all of them on the highway. Since I'm an old man now, I no longer compete in the 80 mph "wolf packs" in the hammer lane that I did as a young buck. Today, you will find me in the right-hand lane where I rarely have to pass others since I'm going at or below the speed limits.

I very rarely drive this car at city stop-and-go speeds. If I did, my average MPGs probably would fall into the 30MPG ranges.

So what you're seeing is the potential of the 2.0L Mazda3 being realized under ideal conditions. Not many folks use their cars the way I do, but if they did, they would see that beating the EPA is not a hard thing to do.

If you are interested, I believed you can "click" on the Fuelly logo in my thread to see for yourself the entire history of my fuel mileage with this magnificent little car. Nothing in it is fabricated.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
Hey everyone Mark here! Just wanted to inform you that I am going to be doing a follow up on the catch can and will be taking more photos of the can set up and valves once I do. I have roughly 600 miles to go until I hit another oil change interval (7,500). I will allow the collected oil to settle and ensure the water and any other contaminants are separated (I may even heat the oil to distill it as I have a beaker set) If anyone shows interest in the catch can set up I may make a video showing the set up I have.
Thanks a bunch, Zoom Zoom.
 

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Hey everyone sorry for the delay I have been extremely busy at work and promised you guys some valve photos! I took some high resolution photos of my valves which you can view down below. The valve images are labeled based on their location with 1A being the valves most left and 1B being the next port over (2A, 2B, 3A etc...). Please note there were cleaned thoroughly 10,000 miles ago and this is the current build up. Also note the oil residue on the mating surface of the intake and the block.

I have also included an image of the PCV system and oil separator labeled in a red circle with PCV outlet in the yellow circle in case anyone needed a better understanding of the system flows.

Please let me know if you have any questions.
Hello again everyone IM BACK FINALLY with some results. Since the last valve check I racked up 10,000 miles and dissembled the intake once again to see how the catch can has been performing.
Once again the valves are in order started with 1A being the left most and 4B being the right most valve, exactly as it was in the other photo. After performing this experiment I have emptied the catch can roughly 4 times to ensure it never accidentally overfilled and have the intake suck in excess oil. Just from what I have seen there is almost no build up of carbon since I began, with the exception of valve 4B which looks slightly more soot covered. This occurrence actually makes sense this the PVC intake line is connected to the right lower portion of the intake manifold meaning that valves 4A and 4B will see the most oil blow-by. I collected roughly 2.5 ml every time I emptied the can for a total of ~10 ml. This mixture smelled of burnt oil and fuel.

Conclusion, this does in fact collect crankcase blow by, although it may not be gallons or pure oil it is still collecting something. Whether or not this will ultimately affects engine longevity will become more clear as time goes on. For now, and this is mostly my opinion, this is slowing (if not mitigating) oil splashing on the intake valves of my vehicle. After installing the can the vehicle has has absolutely no issues, no check engine light, a slight increase in my typical fuel economy (.7-1 mpg increase), and no sputtering, jolting, or odd engine behavior.

Please ask any questions I will do my best to answer.

**Also for some reason my old account was disabled and I needed to remake the account I can assure this is the OP Lemurmarco.
 

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Hello again everyone IM BACK FINALLY with some results. Since the last valve check I racked up 10,000 miles and dissembled the intake once again to see how the catch can has been performing.
Once again the valves are in order started with 1A being the left most and 4B being the right most valve, exactly as it was in the other photo. After performing this experiment I have emptied the catch can roughly 4 times to ensure it never accidentally overfilled and have the intake suck in excess oil. Just from what I have seen there is almost no build up of carbon since I began, with the exception of valve 4B which looks slightly more soot covered. This occurrence actually makes sense this the PVC intake line is connected to the right lower portion of the intake manifold meaning that valves 4A and 4B will see the most oil blow-by. I collected roughly 2.5 ml every time I emptied the can for a total of ~10 ml. This mixture smelled of burnt oil and fuel.

Conclusion, this does in fact collect crankcase blow by, although it may not be gallons or pure oil it is still collecting something. Whether or not this will ultimately affects engine longevity will become more clear as time goes on. For now, and this is mostly my opinion, this is slowing (if not mitigating) oil splashing on the intake valves of my vehicle. After installing the can the vehicle has has absolutely no issues, no check engine light, a slight increase in my typical fuel economy (.7-1 mpg increase), and no sputtering, jolting, or odd engine behavior.

Please ask any questions I will do my best to answer.

**Also for some reason my old account was disabled and I needed to remake the account I can assure this is the OP Lemurmarco.
Thanks for the update, Mark sir!

Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
 

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With the shutdowns and empty roads I'm getting 20mpg with the 2.5

Do i have carbon build up? Or maybe it's my right foot is the problem...
 

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My last GDI car had close to 130k miles before trading it in. Never cleaned the valves, engine pulled same as the day I got it, and MPG never dropped, city or highway.
 
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