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Actron makes some good scanners. If you don't want to spend a lot look on Ebay. Do some homework and you can get a real bargain on a nice scan tool. I found an Actron CP9680 for under $100. The seller had lost the USB cable and couldn't figure out how to replace it.....otherwise it was brand new...:bash::bash:
 

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For cheap and functional, get an elm327 off Amazon. They hook up to your phone via Bluetooth. I use one myself and they are excellent. Many like the torque app, I find I like one called car scanner better.

Do note that these will not do the more advanced 'professional' functions such as allow you to bleed the abs module. If this is what you want, look elsewhere. I'm actually considering getting one of these.
 

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I have the Ancel AD310 and though it's only been needed once for one of my own cars, it's easy to use and clear to read and gives decent live streaming data.

Here's a video I put together back when I had my Elantra.

 

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I'd really like to know what one to get myself. I do have a simple ELM 327 but wouldn't mind a somewhat more feature rich unit. Its one thing to read a feature list for a scanner, but to understand how those features apply to a current gen Mazda would be nice to know.

Bidirectional controls and special tests would be good.
 

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Be careful with the ultra inexpensive Elm 327 clones. I had 2. One was doa and the other lit up all the dash's idiot lights.

Generally, you get what you pay for.

I got an OBDLink with the Mazda Enhanced Diagnostics Add On. Here's what the company says about the add on, "The Mazda Enhanced Diagnostics Add-on adds dealer-level diagnostics for Mazda vehicles with model years 1996 - 2018. You can read and clear trouble codes from proprietary modules such as ABS, Airbag, Transmission, Body Control, and many others. You also get access to hundreds of parameters and sensors that are not available over standard OBD2." https://www.obdsoftware.net/software/mazdaenhancedaddon

https://www.obdsoftware.net/scantools/obdlinkmx

My adapter is 4 years old. I leave it plugged in 24/7. I have an old cell phone dedicated to displaying the info I want while driving.

Its good to get a base report when new. http://site.lvhost2.com:82/car/OBDLink%20Diagnostic%20Report.html

Then one can compare the base report to what is currently happening.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Be careful with the ultra inexpensive Elm 327 clones. I had 2. One was doa and the other lit up all the dash's idiot lights.

Generally, you get what you pay for.

I got an OBDLink with the Mazda Enhanced Diagnostics Add On. Here's what the company says about the add on, "The Mazda Enhanced Diagnostics Add-on adds dealer-level diagnostics for Mazda vehicles with model years 1996 - 2018. You can read and clear trouble codes from proprietary modules such as ABS, Airbag, Transmission, Body Control, and many others. You also get access to hundreds of parameters and sensors that are not available over standard OBD2." https://www.obdsoftware.net/software/mazdaenhancedaddon

https://www.obdsoftware.net/scantools/obdlinkmx

My adapter is 4 years old. I leave it plugged in 24/7. I have an old cell phone dedicated to displaying the info I want while driving.

Its good to get a base report when new. http://site.lvhost2.com:82/car/OBDLink%20Diagnostic%20Report.html

Then one can compare the base report to what is currently happening.
How does this work with the ODB device? It looks like the software is windows based.
 

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How does this work with the ODB device? It looks like the software is windows based.
An OBDII scanner has 2 main parts, the hardware and the software. One can have the best hardware scanner but if the software is lacking, the scanner will be lacking. Likewise, if one has crappy hardware, the scanner will be crappy, even with top of the line software.

It used to be that consumer orientated scanners combined the hardware and software in a single, relatively easy to use, package. We've evolved. Today, the most flexible systems have split interface and the app.

The ODBII interface spews out information. Sometimes its with a hardwired cable, sometimes its with bluetooth, sometimes its with wifi, sometimes its proprietary signals. Any device that can communicate with the interface should work with the interface.

I have bluetooth output on my interface. I've used several different cell phones, a tablet, and a pc to communicate with the interface. I've probably used a dozen or more different software packages to interpret the info. Some software packages (apps/programs) are easy to use, some have pretty output, some have in depth diagnostics, some will tie your shoelaces (future release). Some are free. Some are very expensive.

The OBDLink MX is an $80 interface. It comes with free android and windows software but will work with just about any app or program. The advanced Mazda add on is another $80.

Generally speaking, windows software is more powerful than android software. This makes sense since a windows pc is generally much more powerful than an android. Typically, one doesn't need the most powerful software all the time. Its much easier to haul around a cell phone than a laptop.

The Forscan program is very powerful. Check out https://forscan.org/forum/index.php
The Adapters and Connectors section give some good advice on interfaces.
 

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I tried this Autel scanner:
[ame]https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GWSLPNY[/ame]

For a $100 USD, the features it provides are not bad.
 
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