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Discussion Starter #1
So at least on the west coast, no one has them in stock. So order them ahead of time. Don't do it at the dealer, apparently the made in japan models use something different than the made in mexico ones. You want the 1729 model. Most systems out there today apparently show the wrong version. At least they are really really easy to change. I kid you not, it took me less than half an hour to change out the rear pads. You need a 21 mm socket for the wheels, and a 13mm wrench for the pads and an 8-9inch c clamp for the caliper.

I thought it was highly odd that my rear pads went before my front ones and they didn't make it 50k. Just don't change them at the dealer. They talk up resurfacing rotors. But for the cost you can buy new rotors, pads, and the tools to do it yourself.
 

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I concur on your last point. Once I learned how inexpensive new rotors and pads were if I did it myself, I promised myself to NEVER pay a shop to do that again. It's just crazy if you can do it anyway.
 

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I concur on your last point. Once I learned how inexpensive new rotors and pads were if I did it myself, I promised myself to NEVER pay a shop to do that again. It's just crazy if you can do it anyway.
I'm not saying doing it yourself is bad, but do you know all the proper steps of replacing it?

Did you sand down the surface of the hub when the rotor is off? Did you apply anti-sieze compound on it?

Did you remove and sand down all the stainless clips that hold the pads in place? Did you apply anti-sieze compound on it?

Did you remove the sliders and apply sil-glyde on them?
 

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Did you sand down the surface of the hub when the rotor is off? Did you apply anti-sieze compound on it?
A good step to never forget when you live up north...
In fact, wouldn't hurt to do before you have to replace anything if you live up north.
Everyone forgets this job...

BUT, with that said; could be worse, could be like 50% of Americans and not replace anything when it needs to be lol
 

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Seems that gen1 mazda3 wore out rears first and then fronts.
Thanks for the information on made in Japan vs made in Mexico parts.

CXRGSR for pointing out important steps that I'll need to do as a rookie
wrench turner its on my next Spring to do list when I pull off my Nokians.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not saying doing it yourself is bad, but do you know all the proper steps of replacing it?

Did you sand down the surface of the hub when the rotor is off? Did you apply anti-sieze compound on it?

Did you remove and sand down all the stainless clips that hold the pads in place? Did you apply anti-sieze compound on it?

Did you remove the sliders and apply sil-glyde on them?
I live in California during a drought. Seriously, I could have painted the calipers without cleaning them. They were that clean. Even the clips were still shiny smooth. Just happens to be that I drive around 30-40k a year. Also, in the past I've never had to do any of the above mentioned. I normally apply the grease in the box to moving points. But like I said I live in California, our cars don't get abused by weather as much as most of the country.
 

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were you able to compress the caliper with just a c clamp? I needed a brake caliper tool. apparently the piston needs to be pressed and turned at the same time. Just wondering if I wasted 40 bucks.
 

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Do we need to do anything with the brake caliper tool? All I have is c clamp and some usual tools. I will resurface the rotors, change brake, add anti-seize compound and have good bedding. Also it is very interesting to hear that the rear brake will be wore out faster than the front brake.
 

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Do we need to do anything with the brake caliper tool? All I have is c clamp and some usual tools. I will resurface the rotors, change brake, add anti-seize compound and have good bedding. Also it is very interesting to hear that the rear brake will be wore out faster than the front brake.
lighter on brake = more bias to the rear to prevent nose dive, which gives a very uneasy feeling when unnecessary. That's why

As far as the rears go, I picked up a caliper tool box thing from Harbor Freight.
The needle nose pliar trick is not a fun experience. I did it once, and will never do it again. The little cheap blocks you can get with the pegs at the corner store, had to grind it down to fit, still sucked.

Unfortunately we only have to do the rears, and they are smaller size, but man does it make the job easy....

And then when you do have the tool, friends can come over and you can do them while they feed you free beer! Win win.
 

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the caliper tool kit is the way to go. harbor freight has them for $45 part #69053 the piston needs to be pressed and turned. turning with needle nose and using c clamp is no fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
update I agree with caliper tool, also agree with greasing the clips. There was a huge difference between the outside brake pad and the inside as far as wear goes. Also a huge difference between left brake pads and right brake pads for wear about 4mm difference.
 

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I feel stupid for asking this, but are the rotors side specific? seems some sites list one, and others list a left and a right (aftermarket parts)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Not that I could tell on the rear. But sometimes aftermarkets will have different setups for each. Personally, I wanted to upgrade to the mazda6 calipers as they are bigger and a direct bolt on plus a lot more aftermarket. I think when I go to replace the rotors and pads next time through, I'll go ahead with that project.
 

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There was a huge difference between the outside brake pad and the inside as far as wear goes. Also a huge difference between left brake pads and right brake pads for wear about 4mm difference.
Sounds like your caliper is sticking on the slider pins, that would account for the uneven wear between inside & outside pads. It would also likely account for difference between left & right sides - one side being a bit worse than the other.

Whenever I work on sliding caliper type brakes, I'll always pull the caliper off the pins so they can be fully cleaned, inspected, re-lubed & reassembled with all new seals/boots. It's usually an extra step if just replacing pads, but well worth it.
 
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