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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you guys think the HCCI engine will do in terms of dependability? How about ease of service? I looked at some videos and descriptions on it and it seems 3x more complicated than the already complicated engines of today. More sensors, more components in combustion, and it overall just seems like it would be a nightmare for shops and DIY'ers to diagnose problems as they pop up. I'm all for new tech but I will definitely be staying away and allowing others to test their reliability for me. Hey, maybe it becomes something great and super reliable. Maybe not. How about all of you?
 

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I think I'll wait till it's out and had time to prove itself before making any judgments.

I will say that sensors and electronics are not nearly as bad as everyone seems to think they are. Generally, the ecu will tell you when something fails. Beyond that, get the shop manual with the wiring schematics and learn how it works.
 

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I wouldn't buy the first year production model of any car. If they work out all the bugs after, then it's worth considering.

Just imo
 

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The engine isn't anything drastically different. Its basically a combination of a diesel and a tradition NA. I don't think its going to be any more difficult to maintain than a diesel or a regular NA, so if you've experience with a diesel you should be fine. Its going to be supercharged, but not for performance reasons so there's going to be that extra piece of moving part to be concerned with I suppose. Like someone has mentioned the ECU will let you know if something is wrong since its so integral now.

Here's a nice video explaining how the engine works engineering wise but I'm sure you've seen it! :

Besides this engine is suppose to be the ideal engine having a thermal efficiency of up to 40%! Considering how most engines out there today are only around 20% while diesels around 30%. (More work extracted from energy source)
 

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I think that it will end up being a very reliable engine. Why? Because when everyone is going electric and building EV's an Hybrids platforms , Mazda is gambling their entire future on the SKYACTIV-X engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The engine isn't anything drastically different. Its basically a combination of a diesel and a tradition NA. I don't think its going to be any more difficult to maintain than a diesel or a regular NA, so if you've experience with a diesel you should be fine. Its going to be supercharged, but not for performance reasons so there's going to be that extra piece of moving part to be concerned with I suppose. Like someone has mentioned the ECU will let you know if something is wrong since its so integral now.

Here's a nice video explaining how the engine works engineering wise but I'm sure you've seen it! : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNSxow3W7ek

Besides this engine is suppose to be the ideal engine having a thermal efficiency of up to 40%! Considering how most engines out there today are only around 20% while diesels around 30%. (More work extracted from energy source)
Yeah it doesn't seem TOO drastic but of course, extra complexity always seems to add problems down the road. Even with the video you provided, the whole system seems to have to be perfectly in sync or it wont work. What's the chances in real world driving that it'll end up like that? How will fouled spark plugs effect this engine since it seems like such a fragile and perfectly balanced environment using the SPCCI mode?
 

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I think that it will end up being a very reliable engine. Why? Because when everyone is going electric and building EV's an Hybrids platforms , Mazda is gambling their entire future on the SKYACTIV-X engine.
- Electric vehicles with a long range are - Too Expensive!!

- No Fun without the gas engine, exhaust and transmission sounds/jolting of shifts.

- I'll save the $5k-$10 difference on Vacations.
 

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Some first year cars and/or new tech, have outstanding reliability from the start. All depends on whether one would want to get theirs asap.

As a general rule, as stated by Consumer Reports, Edwards, “we do not care if it is a BMW or a Rolls Royce, we do not recommend getting a first year of a new generation” (and by extrapolation a major changed/new engine). However, I have some friends who have bought a first year of each new Corvette generation, are still smiling, planning to get next year’s Corvette mid-engine.

I guess the two major questions are:

1) How much is your toleration for risk (for statistically, the most reliability year of a model is the last year of its generation, e.g. having gotten the bugs out in earlier years); and,

2) Do you have a fail back vehicle if your first year model is in the shop for a week here, three days there, etc., for if you only have one vehicle and need it to get to work or school or whatever, would it not be more prudent to wait until at least the second year of that new gen vehicle?

Disclosure: I am getting a 2020 model year mid-engine Corvette (in fact one made the first or second week or production) — but I have a couple of other great vehicles ( my ‘17 Mazda and my ‘17 WRT), so if the ME were to spend a week or two in the shop, won’t be thrilled, but no biggie.
 

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I'm not interested in it at all... Performance wise, we aren't gaining anything or losing anything... So, there's not much benefit in getting the Skyactiv-X over the standard Skyactiv, except for MPG.

But what aftermarket car company is going to try to boost or supercharge the Skyactiv-X engine? What aftermarket company will create suspension and handling components for a car that has no engine add ons or components? I mean look what happened to the RX-8 when they introduced the rotary engine...it killed the entire RX line and they haven't released one since 2012. No aftermarket car company could support that engine or that car and it lost all of the true car enthusiasts that had fallen in love with the RX-7 (a modder's dream car able to accept tons of boost).

Adding this complicated engine on top of losing the multi-link suspension indicates to me that Mazda's Zoom-Zoom is no longer circling the drain... it's been flushed.
CK
 

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As I am a long time ASE Master Technician new vehicles are not a problem because they are still computer controlled. That means that most everything will be run through the computer. Everything thing else is simple mechanic's. So knowing and understanding how to use proper diagnostic equipment is all you really need.
IMHO not to get first release of a new design in a vehicle is just "MYTH" as far as major issues are concerned comparatively speaking! You really need to give the Automotive Engineer's a little more credit not to mention all the testing that is done before they go to production. Historically speaking there has been very few catastrophic issues with any model new released and most of the problems that new released vehicles have are generally after they have a couple years and a couple 10 thousand miles on them. Sure we can always find the information that may debate or challenge my comments but that is what the internet is really good for, to always find the answer you want to read and not necessary empirical.:nerd:
 

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I think that it will end up being a very reliable engine. Why? Because when everyone is going electric and building EV's an Hybrids platforms , Mazda is gambling their entire future on the SKYACTIV-X engine.
That strategy won't work in the UK where cars having a minimum electric only 50 mile range are required by 2040. Some EU countries have more ambitious electric vehicle targets.
 

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As I am a long time ASE Master Technician new vehicles are not a problem because they are still computer controlled. That means that most everything will be run through the computer. Everything thing else is simple mechanic's. So knowing and understanding how to use proper diagnostic equipment is all you really need.
IMHO not to get first release of a new design in a vehicle is just "MYTH" as far as major issues are concerned comparatively speaking! You really need to give the Automotive Engineer's a little more credit not to mention all the testing that is done before they go to production. Historically speaking there has been very few catastrophic issues with any model new released and most of the problems that new released vehicles have are generally after they have a couple years and a couple 10 thousand miles on them. Sure we can always find the information that may debate or challenge my comments but that is what the internet is really good for, to always find the answer you want to read and not necessary empirical.:nerd:
For most companies, I'd think you might get a few more little things that aren't right in the first production models. But so what? That's what the warranty is for.

I find that almost every new car will have something minor go wrong. I had a faulty backup camera, heater control cable seized (apparently a known issue), and the gas struts on the trunk hatch didn't lift....and it was all fixed promptly.

People seem to think that the new models are going to explode and it will be the end of life as we know it. Most of the engineers aren't completely stupid contrary to popular belief.
 

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That strategy won't work in the UK where cars having a minimum electric only 50 mile range are required by 2040. Some EU countries have more ambitious electric vehicle targets.
I read somewhere that Mazda's SKYACTIV-X strategy is for at least the next 10 years.

Also Toyota formed an electric car technology venture with Mazda, in order to develop electric vehicle technology:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...r-technology-venture-with-mazda-idUSKCN1C3071

So I'm positive that by 2040 or before Mazda will have good electric alternatives in the market considering the ambitious EU regulations regarding electric cars and reducing emissions.
 

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For most companies, I'd think you might get a few more little things that aren't right in the first production models. But so what? That's what the warranty is for.

I find that almost every new car will have something minor go wrong. I had a faulty backup camera, heater control cable seized (apparently a known issue), and the gas struts on the trunk hatch didn't lift....and it was all fixed promptly.

People seem to think that the new models are going to explode and it will be the end of life as we know it. Most of the engineers aren't completely stupid contrary to popular belief.
Ya ^^^:thumbup1 1:

I have been expecting something will need attention on my 2018 M3 but so far ...ok. I have also done more then most to check things. I went so far to do a compression test in the first 100 miles just to record it and when the engine is run in at about 10k miles. I also did weighing including 4 corner, motor oil analysis,and a base line engine output run at 5k miles. There is so much dis-information about most platforms on forums that it is hard to weed through fact, fiction and MYTH about a specific model like the M3. This includes aftermarket parts which is a tall tail of stories about what works and really is "bling". Hey about "exploding cars....remember the PINTO? :surprise:
 

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...... I mean look what happened to the RX-8 when they introduced the rotary engine...it killed the entire RX line and they haven't released one since 2012. No aftermarket car company could support that engine or that car and it lost all of the true car enthusiasts that had fallen in love with the RX-7 (a modder's dream car able to accept tons of boost)........
CK
I guess I'm missing something here - wasn't the RX-7 powered by a rotary engine :confused::confused:
 

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Yes, all RX branded cars have a rotary engine. Sorry for the misinformation.

They changed the engine from the RX-7 13b engine, which was a 1.3L twin rotor with peripheral exhaust ports, to the RX-8 renesis engine, which also had a 1.3L twin rotor but it had side exhaust ports. The side exhaust ports limited the power potential of the car.

They also sold the RX-7 with a couple of different engine variations.. naturally aspirated, single turbo or twin turbo (FD model sold from '93-'02). The The RX-8 was just naturally aspirated and was never given a turbo. It had much less power and torque than it's predecessor and was more of a daily driver with better MPG.
CK
 
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Yes, all RX branded cars have a rotary engine.
I was one of the lucky ones that got a factory handported engine. If anyone is really into the Rotaries then you know what I am talking about! :grin2:
 
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