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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi guys, I’ve been searching a lot around on the web and the forum for a set of wheels to replace the “heavy” 16 OEM alloys in my 17 Mazda hatch and after a week I came down to these two option,
The Motegi MR131 Tracklite 7X17 or 8x17 et45
Konig Hypergram 8x17 et45
The tire size I’m looking at is 215/50r17 and here is where the dilema comes.
Konig only offers 8x17 and I’m concerned that the 215 won’t stick a bit out of the rim to protect it, where I live in Florida I do a lot of parallel parkin. Will 215 be good for an 8 wide rim?
I also like the motegi cause it saves me $200 and the budget is tie, also cause they offer the 7wide option which I know would be fine for a 215 tire.
I would like to go as light on the wheels as possible and they both have almost same weight. They both are flow casted so “same quality.
What do you guys think
 

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Keep in mind that tire size numbers are not entirely accurate between different tires. For example: Pirelli PZero Nero GT 225 / 17 / 45 have a tread width of only 6.5" (8.9" section width plus a rim protection flange). Jump up to a 235 / 17 / 45 (only technically 10mm wider with a 9.3" section width) and suddenly you have a 8.5" tread width. So a rated 10mm increase in tire width gives you a whole 2" of extra tread width. Use tirerack.com to get the more exact measurements of tire width, tread width, circumference, and whether or not the tires you are looking at have a rim protection flange around them. Odds are that 215 tires will not defend your 8" wide wheel, but some tires might have a little extra meat around the sides so you never know. They have pretty comprehensive information on their site.

That same tire in 215 / 40 / 17 states a 7.6" tread width while a 215 / 50 / 17 states 7.3" tread width. The number you will be paying most attention to on that site is the 'section width' which gives you the overall width of the tire from outer to inner sidewall. These two sizes have listed section widths of 8.6" and 8.9" respectively, which technically means you might actually have some bit of a sidewall bumper to guard your wheel's rim from curbing. Your tread width is wide enough so that it will not pull the sidewall inward too far so for this particular tire, you might be ok. But again, the xxx / xx / xx numbers are basically industry ballpark numbers (except the rim size, of course), so do some homework.

Just look up whichever tire you are looking for in the size you want and scroll down to where it says 'specs' and click on that. They list all their independent measurements which are definitely accurate enough to give you a good idea before you purchase. If you are looking for a tire that they don't carry... sorry, don't know what to tell ya. I don't know any other web site that is as comprehensive as tire rack. Good luck?

Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Keep in mind that tire size numbers are not entirely accurate between different tires. For example: Pirelli PZero Nero GT 225 / 17 / 45 have a tread width of only 6.5" (8.9" section width plus a rim protection flange). Jump up to a 235 / 17 / 45 (only technically 10mm wider with a 9.3" section width) and suddenly you have a 8.5" tread width. So a rated 10mm increase in tire width gives you a whole 2" of extra tread width. Use tirerack.com to get the more exact measurements of tire width, tread width, circumference, and whether or not the tires you are looking at have a rim protection flange around them. Odds are that 215 tires will not defend your 8" wide wheel, but some tires might have a little extra meat around the sides so you never know. They have pretty comprehensive information on their site.

That same tire in 215 / 40 / 17 states a 7.6" tread width while a 215 / 50 / 17 states 7.3" tread width. The number you will be paying most attention to on that site is the 'section width' which gives you the overall width of the tire from outer to inner sidewall. These two sizes have listed section widths of 8.6" and 8.9" respectively, which technically means you might actually have some bit of a sidewall bumper to guard your wheel's rim from curbing. Your tread width is wide enough so that it will not pull the sidewall inward too far so for this particular tire, you might be ok. But again, the xxx / xx / xx numbers are basically industry ballpark numbers (except the rim size, of course), so do some homework.

Just look up whichever tire you are looking for in the size you want and scroll down to where it says 'specs' and click on that. They list all their independent measurements which are definitely accurate enough to give you a good idea before you purchase. If you are looking for a tire that they don't carry... sorry, don't know what to tell ya. I don't know any other web site that is as comprehensive as tire rack. Good luck?

Hope this helps!
Thank you for the replay, like you said, every tire is different even if they have the same size, since I’m not set for an specific tire other than wanting to run the 215/50r17 size, I will go for the safest bet wich is the Motegi wheel with 7” wide, I don’t want to risk it with an 8” wide wheel like the hypergram.
I don’t see many guys if any running the motegi tracklite, would that be a good budget choice?
 

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Your main difference between the Motegi Traklite and the Konig Hypergrams is the casting process. I believe Motegi wheels are still gravity cast before rotary forging (are they even rotary forged?). Konig Hypergram is low pressure cast before rotary forging. Low pressure casting is supposed to create better structural integrity in the material and reduced risk of air pockets which can cause wheels to crack under impact. Each of the two casting processes are exactly as they sound. Gravity cast means they are simply pouring the molten aluminum from a spout or opening a valve and letting the material flow into the mold. Low pressure casting uses low pressure to force the material into the mold and pushes it into every possible crevice, thus reducing air pockets and supposedly creating better molecular alignment (too much science for my brain, but it sounds good!)

The old adage 'you get what you pay for' is a good indicator when it comes to wheels. While Konigs are still at the lower end of the price spectrum (versus Motegi Traklites which are cheaper by at least $50 per wheel), they are very strong and reliable from what I have seen / heard / experienced. I see more weekend racers / amature race teams running Konigs than Motegi (do not be confused with Motegis on pro race cars, those are from their forged line and are much more expensive like any other fully forged wheel). That is not to say that every wheel is immune to failure, but your better bet is the company that uses the better manufacturing technique. Konig's low pressure forming technique is the same as OZ's HLT wheels and Enkei's performance wheels (although OZ and Enkei also have additional processes like heat treating that help even more).

That's my two cents... maybe even a quarter's worth?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's my two cents... maybe even a quarter's worth?
Well, initially I was going for the hypergram for what you explained, then I saw motegi and after some research I came to consider it, at first I was skeptical of the low price, but the brand turned out to be a prestigious one, the are not as mainstream cause don’t advertise their products focusing mainly in the racing events, this makes sense on the price, less marketing, lower price tag. Let’s see if someone can comment on the motegi tracklite from experience and see if we get another quarter dollar in the thread haha.
To be clear, I like hypergram, who wouldn’t at that price for the technology offered in it.
 

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I’ve been running the MR131 18x8 with a 5m spacer for over a year and about 15k miles. Drove across the US with them, hit a ton of very bad potholes in the dark and they have held up very well. I would say they are extremely good value for their low cost and lightness ??
 

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If you like them both equally (visually), and aren't going to run some hellaflush rubber bands, assuming there's minimal weight differences, I wouldn't have an issue running the Motegi's.

I used to have a version of their traclight rim (ugly as sin, but they weighed something ridiculous like 13.4lbs for 17x8) for autox and they held up just okay. (not surprising.. wouldn't expect a wheel to fail)
 
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