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So i know people have already talked about the opencar partnering up with mazda for their hmi system. Some example pictures/examples The SDK is open for developers and uses HTML5.
How many people here are developers or programmers that can help making those apps possible for our humble mazda 3. It should be possible to add custom apps to our infotainment once its made in the SDK since open car is the platform mazda is using.




One more tidbit picked up in this article.

A flexible hardware structure featuring a module unit for each function allows the system to meet a wide range of needs flexibly. - Which i am hoping means that parts can be swapped out to meet better systems. Bluetooth module,additional memory etc
 

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OpenCar specify that their system will be browser based, and if using HTML5 should essentially negate the use of apps in the common *smartphone* sence, and instead is more likely to function by way of *live widgets or web applets*.


At least that's my current line of speculation.
 

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How many people here are developers or programmers that can help making those apps possible for our humble mazda 3. It should be possible to add custom apps to our infotainment once its made in the SDK since open car is the platform mazda is using.
Awesome find! I'm a developer and I just downloaded the SDK. Can't wait to start playing around with it :biggrin:
 

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Damn well this is exciting.... I hope that we'll be able to be a part of this upgrade.

Hopefully it will bring along some exploits that will allow us to disable some of the annoying features, like no touch screen while moving, no video playback.... I dunno..... :shifty: :thumbup1 1:
 

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So i know people have already talked about the opencar partnering up with mazda for their hmi system. Some example pictures/examples The SDK is open for developers and uses HTML5.
How many people here are developers or programmers that can help making those apps possible for our humble mazda 3.
Depends, I'm a pretty expensive hacker.

I think I may have met some of the OpenCar devs at some point, the name sounds familiar (may have been at this, which I attended last year).

I'll take a look at the SDK. I don't have high expectations, given that the SDK is for Mac only and real SDKs can be used on Linux.
 

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Okay, so, off the bat my thoughts:

The SDK seems to limit you to HTML/Javascript, which are very high level programming mechanisms. The platform is basically more restrictive in terms of "app" development options than iOS - and iOS is a very tightly controlled environment.

http://sdk.opencar.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Architecture-Detail.png
(that's a diagram of their architecture, you may need to register for the SDK to see it)

The SDK itself consists of a few parts:

* A simulator environment which only runs on Mac (ugh)
* Development tools: debugger, command-line interface (no compiler needed because it's javascript)

It looks like OpenCar is running on top of <insert propietary mazda real-time operating system>. OpenCar indicates that there platform can pretty much run on any automotive software stack.

I'd have to look at it more to get a feel for how horrible or not horrible I think it is, but my initial impression is that OpenCar appears to be a heavily sandboxed environment. You'd probably need to "jailbreak" your car to deal with some of the annoying infotainment issues, similiar to how you'd have to "jailbreak" your iPhone to deal with some of the annoying iOS issues.

You definitely will be able to develop some cool apps with this, but I'd suspect that OpenCar will not allow the masses to modify the infotainment system in whatever way they see fit. For that, you'd need to jailbreak the system.
 

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A flexible hardware structure featuring a module unit for each function allows the system to meet a wide range of needs flexibly. - Which i am hoping means that parts can be swapped out to meet better systems. Bluetooth module,additional memory etc
Bluetooth can't be swapped for a different type of bluetooth module, at least not easily. I took at look at it the other day.

There are basically two pieces of hardware in the car that implement bluetooth connectivity.

First, under the glove compartment (on the side of the door), there's the actual bluetooth hardware. It's a fairly small package. I haven't taken it apart yet but my guess would be that it contains just a bluetooth chip, and a very basic MCU.

Also under the glove compartment is the primary chip (e.g. the head unit) - Mazda calls this the connectivity master unit (CMU). The manual says that the CMU stores the bluetooth pairings, which confirms, unfortunately, that the bluetooth module only has a dumb MCU onboard. I'm guessing the CMU also handles the logic for all other wireless communicaton (GPS, satellite/FM/AM radio), but definitely not the 315MHz stuff (e.g. the car keys).

Anyways, I haven't taken it apart yet, but I'm certain that the bluetooth module is a single board with both a bluetooth chip and an MCU embedded on it. If Mazda was smart, the CMU and the bluetooth module communicate via an obscure internal networking protocol (I haven't determined the type of physical transport between the two, it's probably CAN). The details of said protocol are only known by the firmware of the CMU/bluetooth module. Any sort of aftermarket bluetooth device would need to know and implement this protocol.

I think what Mazda means by modular is that if your bluetooth module dies or has issues, they are only going to charge you to replace the bluetooth module, not the CMU.

As for the RAM for the CMU, I'd guess that it is embedded in the CMU. It would be costly and unnecessary for them to make it modular. The only reason to make memory modular is if you're using high-performance, high-capacity RAM (e.g. the type of memory that's in your laptop) which is going to fail (relatively) frequently and need replacement (or if it may need to be upgraded). A central processor for a car infotainment system needs high-reliability, low-performance and low-capacity memory. The memory won't have a high failure rate, and it won't need upgrades (unless you are planning on playing video games on your CMU). It would just be bad economics for them to make it modular.

^ All of the above should be correct(ish) to the best of my knowledge, but it's late and there may be mistakes.
 
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