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Article from AutoGuide


It would have been easy to write rotary engines off the speculative books at Mazda — poor milage and questionable long-term reliability made traditional piston engines seem favorable to many.

Yet against the odds, the Japanese automaker seems to have found a formula to keep the smooth-spinning screamer alive in its lineup.

Mitsuo Hitomi, general manager of powertrain development at Mazda recently said that the company plans to complete development of such an engine that will also meet future fuel-economy and emissions standards.

“We think we’ve found a way to improve the rotary’s fuel economy to be truly equal to that of conventional piston engines and, if so, we believe we can reintroduce the rotary to the market,” Hitomi recently told Ward’s Auto.

Much of the new technological breakthrough came in changing the shape of the troichoid housing so that the seals remained flush to the housing. Better sealing means better fuel economy and overall performance. Since the early days of rotary engines, its seals and its “sealability” have always been an issue, dating back to the mid-1960s. “Even with our current 1.3L Renesis rotary, gaps can develop between the apex seal and troichoid housing in light-load operation when imbalances in centrifugal force and gas pressure occur,” Himoti said.

The next engineering enhancement for the new rotary engine will be a focus on ignition. Unfortunately the engineer couldn’t explain on how the Japanese automaker plans on addressing that problem.

Regardless of the improvements made in the next-generation rotary engine, we expect to see it being used for extended-range electric vehicles and Mazda’s Skyactiv technology to be incorporated.

At a press briefing in December, Hirotaka Kanazawa, senior managing executive officer in charge of Mazda’s technical operations, openly discussed three Skyactiv engine series: the gasoline Skyactiv-G now on the market, diesel Skyactiv-D and rotary Skyactiv-R
 

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Article from AutoGuide


It would have been easy to write rotary engines off the speculative books at Mazda — poor milage and questionable long-term reliability made traditional piston engines seem favorable to many.

Yet against the odds, the Japanese automaker seems to have found a formula to keep the smooth-spinning screamer alive in its lineup.

Mitsuo Hitomi, general manager of powertrain development at Mazda recently said that the company plans to complete development of such an engine that will also meet future fuel-economy and emissions standards.

“We think we’ve found a way to improve the rotary’s fuel economy to be truly equal to that of conventional piston engines and, if so, we believe we can reintroduce the rotary to the market,” Hitomi recently told Ward’s Auto.

Much of the new technological breakthrough came in changing the shape of the troichoid housing so that the seals remained flush to the housing. Better sealing means better fuel economy and overall performance. Since the early days of rotary engines, its seals and its “sealability” have always been an issue, dating back to the mid-1960s. “Even with our current 1.3L Renesis rotary, gaps can develop between the apex seal and troichoid housing in light-load operation when imbalances in centrifugal force and gas pressure occur,” Himoti said.

The next engineering enhancement for the new rotary engine will be a focus on ignition. Unfortunately the engineer couldn’t explain on how the Japanese automaker plans on addressing that problem.

Regardless of the improvements made in the next-generation rotary engine, we expect to see it being used for extended-range electric vehicles and Mazda’s Skyactiv technology to be incorporated.

At a press briefing in December, Hirotaka Kanazawa, senior managing executive officer in charge of Mazda’s technical operations, openly discussed three Skyactiv engine series: the gasoline Skyactiv-G now on the market, diesel Skyactiv-D and rotary Skyactiv-R
This could be interesting but still it is a rotary... unless turbo it is slow.. lol
 

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4 rotor twin turbo or nothing. Also rotarys can be reliable if taken care of properly and adding 1 step not many people know/do. Add 2 stroke oil to the gas at least 2x a month
 

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Good news everyone, the rotary is making a comeback!

I'm looking forward to various models being offered with rotary. MX-5 into a MX-5R? New RX model, 3R and 6R. Have a brand wide mazdaspeed line up with skyactiv-R. It's a dream of mine.
 

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skyactiv and R can't be together, skyactiv = fuel efficient
rotary = gas guzzler!
Well, Mazda is working on Skyactiv Rotary drivetrain technology.

In Europe and Asia there are Hybrid Hydrogen Rotary Rx-8's driving around.
 

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Yes.. usually less power = better mileage
Dual fuel renesis gives 210hp on gas and 109hp on hydrogen. Can go 60 miles on hydrogen. They are looking into using the rotary as a replacement for a piston engine as a range extender in some audi hybrids.
 

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I agree and rotarys are junk they come in everyday with same problem being flooded!
The only reason they flood is because people don know how to drive them. Ive had over ten rotaries not once has one flooded on me.rotaries are awesome but they are gas guzzlers wich is why i got rid of my 8. Love my 3 for dd.
 

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109hp? that's like Geo metro status...
Yes it is, but not uncommon in Europe. They have a lot of little cars running around with only 100hp or so churning out of 1.0 to 1.4L engines.

When gas is pushing $10~$12 a gallon and your annual registration/road tax is often based on your car's carbon foot print (like in the UK) people go with the smallest engines possible. When I lived over there it was not uncommon to see an A8 or S-Class running 2.0L gas engines or a comprable sized diesel.

They have a completly different mindset. I'm sure Asia is much the same way.
 
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