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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've done a handful of research, it'd be a shame not to share it. I am planning on replacing the factory SGT 18" wheels with some much lighter. I want to stick with 18", and ideally with 7.5" wide (225 tires would be plenty wide for me, and the wider the heavier). Some of these options only come in 8" or 8.5" wide, so I've made some tire notes too. My goal is to drop 10 pounds from each corner; 40 pounds of rotating mass reduction should net a huge improvement in acceleration, braking, and handling. There will also likely be a bit of an imporvement in MPG. The obvious negatives are cost of initial investment, and that light weight wheels are arguably less durable (take that with a grain of salt, there are infinite variables). Prices are subject to change... some are harder to find than others... you'll figure it out!

I'm cheap, but willing to pay to play. These wheels are all between $200 and $400 each. There are tons of lightweight choices above that price point, I haven't included them here (because I personally can't fathom spending more than 10% of the cost of the new car, on a replacement set of wheels). These are all below 20 pounds each.

The base-line:
OEM SGT Wheels: 18x7" @ 26.7 lbs
OEM Dunlop Tires: 215/45 @ 23 lbs
49.7 pounds per corner


23 pounds is fairly standard for tires around these sizes. But it is possible to find some a bit lighter, even up to 235 wide (for the 8 or 8.5" wheels). I'll may go with the Hankook Ventus S1 noble2: Long treadlife, great reviews, only 19 pounds in the factory 215 wide, or 22 pounds in 235 wide.

Wheels, in order of price:

Konig Milligram 18x8.5" 18.9 pounds $230 each



Konig Kilogram 18x8.5" 19 pounds $240 each


Enkei RPF1 18x7.5" 17.6 pounds $270 each



OZ Ultraleggara 18x8" 18.4 pounds $329 each


Forgestar F14 18x8.5" 18.5 pounds $350 each


OZ Alleggerita 18x7.5" 16.3 pounds $389 each






With the above info, the lightest weight option is the OZ Alleggerita wheels, with the Hankook 215 tires. 16.3+19 = 35.3 pounds, or a savings of 14.4 pounds per corner, or 57.6 pounds total. Which is huge, but at a serious cost: about $2100.


I'm all ears to other options or input. My personal priorities are 18", 7.5-8.5" wide, below 20 pounds, below $400 (but they'd have to be ridiculously lightweight and gorgeous for me to justify even that). In tires, I require all season and good treadlife. I'm over the swapping wheels out with the seasons, or replacing tires every couple years.
 

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Thx for sharing what you've found. Since I'm also in the market for new wheels and rubber this spring, this is very helpful.

Others will be much more knowledgeable than me, but I've read lots of good things about the Enkei RPF1s, which look great in your rendition above (can I ask how you did that?) and are the next lightest after the Alleggeritas.

Haven't personally looked into tires just yet, but here's a thread on all-season (or 3-season) options, which you've probably already seen.

http://mazda3revolution.com/forums/2014-mazda-3-skyactiv-wheels-tires/83794-18-all-season-tire-options-2014-s-touring.html

I'm personally still trying to decide if I want a dedicated winter set-up. Not sure it's worth is for where I live (Northern VA/DC area) since my oem's (on steelies) have gotten me through this winter so far. Sounds like you're tired of doing that; I wouldn't mind hearing more about exactly why. I've been assuming that running 2 separate sets of tires would reduce the frequency of tire purchases. What am I missing?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
The Enkei's are a great value for as light as they are. They're not my favorite as far as looks, I think the double lip make them look smaller than they actually are... but regardless, they, with the 215 hankooks, would easily pass my 10 pound off goal (it would be about 13 pounds off), and they'd be $500 less than the OZ Al's.

I use a program called Paint.NET to make those renditions. it's basically a free version of photoshop, available for download from Cnet.com.

I had winter wheels and summer wheels for years with my last car. I began motorcycling so much, I was only putting about 5000 miles a year or less on my car... soon, I found myself not changing to the summer wheels, because I drove the car so little. So I drove for years on the winter wheels, and sold off the summer set.

Now, I want one set of wheels, that looks good, handle well in the summer, and can survive the less-than-ten-days of snowy roads we have a year.

Having a winter set and a summer set are absolutely worth it if:
1)you want very high performance tires for the summer
and/or
2)you have to deal with a ton of snow (and/or you want to have more fun in the snow)
and/or
3)you put so many miles on you car you're wearing out tires fairly rapidly, and two sets will be beneficial.
 

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I'm personally still trying to decide if I want a dedicated winter set-up. Not sure it's worth is for where I live (Northern VA/DC area) since my oem's (on steelies) have gotten me through this winter so far. Sounds like you're tired of doing that; I wouldn't mind hearing more about exactly why. I've been assuming that running 2 separate sets of tires would reduce the frequency of tire purchases. What am I missing?
If he didn't have a spare set of wheels in the past, I can see it being more annoying. Also, storing 4 wheels with tires on them takes up a lot of space if you don't have a ton to begin with. I find good all seasons to be fine in this area, unless you're more towards West Virginia and the mountains.

Aside from the Alleggeritas, the rest of the wheels aren't a large enough weight difference where I think it would be worth choosing them over another instead of going by appearance and size. Even then, if you don't particularly like them then I'd go with another. I personally like the Kilograms and F14s the most. How much is the difference in price for the tires?
 

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Given the choices above, I vote for the forgestar f14. You can sometimes find deals on them through eBay. I was close to ordering a set myself.

The rpf1 is not an attractive wheel until you get in the 9"+ width range, the spokes are convex in anything below 9" +45. Much more attractive with flat or concave spokes.

I have seen two sets of F14s, both finishes (matte black and OEM brushed) looked fantastic.

The milligrams are great wheels too, but very little heritage behind them, which could also be said of everything minus the OZ's and enkei's.

All great choices though.
 

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I use a program called Paint.NET to make those renditions. it's basically a free version of photoshop, available for download from Cnet.com.
You should try Gimp while you're at it, if you haven't. It's supposed to be more powerful and still is open source, which likely is why it is. I've found it to be better than photoshop in a lot of areas - especially upscale algorithms.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Tire price ranges are huge between the different types/brands, but not so much between different sizes. Within the same brand and model, there is usually less than $30 difference from 215 to 235.

Worth mentioning though, is that you may end up having to roll fenders or buy spacers with 235 tires and/or 8.5" wheels. Sticking with the closer-to-oem sizes will generally be easier to install.

I do agree though, it is most up to the looks and price, when the weight difference is so small. I think the F14's are my favorite too, but I don't particularly want the 8.5" width, and the cost is up there.
 

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In the rear, with an 8.5" wheel in the +40 to +50 range, you will definitely need to roll the rear fender if you are considering more than 1.25 to 1.5" lowering springs or coilovers. Assuming 235/35 or 40 series tires and full range of suspension travel.

225/40 cleared on a 18x9 +45, but only just barely.
 

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Avoid the Alleggeritas.

I wanted some, came close to pulling the trigger, but between the cost and the availability made them not even close to worth it.
Gorgeous wheels, yes, worth it? Depends how much you're willing to spend.

Short story ends up being I purchased RPF1s.

You're on the true correct path though, not something most people do. Everyone considers the weight of the wheel and never the tire. The tire is the heaviest part of a wheel, and also have the most impact on performance (weight wise [because, you know, furthest from center]).

As with anything car wise, it's always a compromise.


You want serious weight savings?
SSR Type Cs.
Unfortunately they're expensive as all getout, if they even make the size you want. They didn't, nor could I afford them.

Track setup?
Wedsport TC105ns.
15.4lbs 17x8.5
Type Cs were just under 15lbs (14.9?) 17x8.5
But they also cost 1.5x more than the already expensive TC105ns.. but could never find any for sale.


Remember, not many people think about it this way, but wheels are "wear" items.
You don't want to think about it as a one time expense until you find a time to get rid of them. If you damage one or whatever happens, you have to consider the idea of how fast you can replace it, and again, for the least amount of money.


"people" may call the RPF1 "overplayed," call it what you want, but there's a reason why it's proven to be a great wheel. It's an amazing compromise where the customer wins. Lightweight, and very cheap.

Ultimately it's your call however on appearance.

Unfortunately I can't give advice on tire specs because I'm not sure how fitment is with the gen3, but I was originally running 235/40s on the wedsports which are 17x8.5+32, with -2.5 / -1 camber respectively it was a very tight fit and easily required some amount of pulling and rolling.

Depending on the function, sometimes a skinnier wheel and tire setup is better. Lighter steering, cheaper tires, and better rain performance.
 

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Tire price ranges are huge between the different types/brands, but not so much between different sizes. Within the same brand and model, there is usually less than $30 difference from 215 to 235.
Not if a size is rare though. I was looking at the Mazda 6 and on tirerack, the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3 tires are $170 each on the sport model. For the 19s, the same tire is $243. The 19 Michelins have a higher speed rating, but that doesn't matter. I also was looking into the Sonic and and one acceptable width, the tires were about $65 more each. My Trans Am's tires got super expensive recently because there aren't any wide tires for 16s these days. Tires that were $110 each became $250.
 

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Maybe you are not considering 17" based on looks, but you can get much greater weight savings with 17 x 7.5 wheels (perhaps Enkeii Fujins) and 225/50 tires. I am going with this tire size because I do not want a smaller diameter tire than stock, and I think this is the ultimate compromise between weight, grip, and looks.

Dave
 

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Is it really worth it? There Are a lot 20 lbs wheels out there (18") and they Are not expensive at all...
difference between someone that cares and someone that doesn't care.. at least as much if any.

besides, the stock 18s are probably only 22lbs anyway, 2lbs isn't worth it, especially when there are super nice lightweight wheels to begin with, as OP stated.

Outside of OEMs, I will never buy wheels that cost less than my set of RPF1s. Mainly because I won't trust them at that low of a cost.
$800 for a set of 17s is beyond fair. If you're paying less than that... you can't really expect good results.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Maybe you are not considering 17" based on looks, but you can get much greater weight savings with 17 x 7.5 wheels (perhaps Enkeii Fujins) and 225/50 tires...
Personally, I am not considering 17's because of the looks. That being said, I've found the weight difference isn't significant either.. The fujins you referenced are only 1 pound lighter than the 18" RPF1's. And RPF1's drop 2 pounds when you go down to 17's, but you're getting a taller tire to make up for it (so gearing is unchanged...) You've instantly made up that weight (the Hankooks in 215/45/18 weigh 19 lbs, and in 215/50/17 they come in at 22 pounds) So with the either the Fujins or RPF1's and Hankook tires, the 18" setup is actually lighter.
I have no doubt some 17" setups are lighter than some 18" setups... but the difference isn't significant enough for me to justify it.

Is it really worth it? There Are a lot 20 lbs wheels out there (18") and they Are not expensive at all...
I don't follow... is what worth it? Paying a little more to get an 18 pound wheel rather than a 20 pound wheel? Personal preference. I'll pay a little more... sure!

besides, the stock 18s are probably only 22lbs anyway...
Reportedly they weigh in at 26.7 pounds. Ouch!
 

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Avoid the Alleggeritas.

I wanted some, came close to pulling the trigger, but between the cost and the availability made them not even close to worth it.
Gorgeous wheels, yes, worth it? Depends how much you're willing to spend.

Short story ends up being I purchased RPF1s.

You're on the true correct path though, not something most people do. Everyone considers the weight of the wheel and never the tire. The tire is the heaviest part of a wheel, and also have the most impact on performance (weight wise [because, you know, furthest from center]).

As with anything car wise, it's always a compromise.


You want serious weight savings?
SSR Type Cs.
Unfortunately they're expensive as all getout, if they even make the size you want. They didn't, nor could I afford them.

Track setup?
Wedsport TC105ns.
15.4lbs 17x8.5
Type Cs were just under 15lbs (14.9?) 17x8.5
But they also cost 1.5x more than the already expensive TC105ns.. but could never find any for sale.


Remember, not many people think about it this way, but wheels are "wear" items.
You don't want to think about it as a one time expense until you find a time to get rid of them. If you damage one or whatever happens, you have to consider the idea of how fast you can replace it, and again, for the least amount of money.


"people" may call the RPF1 "overplayed," call it what you want, but there's a reason why it's proven to be a great wheel. It's an amazing compromise where the customer wins. Lightweight, and very cheap.

Ultimately it's your call however on appearance.

Unfortunately I can't give advice on tire specs because I'm not sure how fitment is with the gen3, but I was originally running 235/40s on the wedsports which are 17x8.5+32, with -2.5 / -1 camber respectively it was a very tight fit and easily required some amount of pulling and rolling.

Depending on the function, sometimes a skinnier wheel and tire setup is better. Lighter steering, cheaper tires, and better rain performance.
I see that the TireRack is selling the RPF1's without the center cap. You pay about $26 each for the caps. Does anyone know if the OEM Mazda caps fit the RPF1's?

Dave
 

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Screw centercaps lol
don't need them, and everyone charges an arm and a leg for them.

I think most people end up with plugs from home depot or something for like $1 if you care enough.

I don't care, none of my wheels have centercaps lol
 
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