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Discussion Starter #1
Hi!

Are those very strong light-beams towards to the sky normal for the 3s?
It is particularly funny when I use high-beam in a dense fog, there are two, clearly visible beams from the headlights up onto the sky...

I would like to photo it to show you but I hope it is not only my car's "problem".

Thanks!
(I tried to paint it for you how does these beams look like from the driver's seat:) Just imagine it's exactly that way in the real where in the picture:)
http://mazda3revolution.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=188354&thumb=1
 

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Using high beams in the fog is the worst thing you can do as they reflect off the fog.. The visibility in front of you will sharply decrease in a fog, so use the vehicle's low beam lights (if the vehicle does not have fog lights or driving lights). Heavy fog conditions prohibit use of high beam headlights. The light from high beam headlights will be reflected back by thick fog. As fog thins, high beams can become more effective. Check periodically to see if the fog has thinned enough to make use of high beams.
 

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Using high beams in the fog is the worst thing you can do as they reflect off the fog..
I know, I driving for more than 15 years. Unfortunately I live in a very foggy area. An I am absolutely aware of the negative effects of high-beam using in the fog.

My question was only to indicate that these high beams to the sky are most easily visible during dense conditions:)

Other than that there isn't even needed fog, in a clear dark night you should drive under trees, and if you turn your head upside from the dashboard, you will see that the trees on top of the car nicely lighted up:)
 

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I know, I driving for more than 15 years. Unfortunately I live in a very foggy area. An I am absolutely aware of the negative effects of high-beam using in the fog.

My question was only to indicate that these high beams to the sky are most easily visible during dense conditions:)

Other than that there isn't even needed fog, in a clear dark night you should drive under trees, and if you turn your head upside from the dashboard, you will see that the trees on top of the car nicely lighted up:)
I think it might be an inherent characteristic of cars with tear drop headlights that extend up the hood line. Part of the headlight glass is facing the sky and light leaks out in an upward fashion. I think it would happen the most on high beams. Any other ideas?
 
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