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Discussion Starter #1
Hello

I have been trying for some time to find an induction solution for the Mazda 3 which would offer some real performance improvements.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t convinced by none of the solutions I could find online (particularly the SRAM solutions from CorkSport and K&N).

However, just very recently I’ve come across ITG (Induction Technology Group), which I’ve never heard of before.

Strangely enough, they have been designing and manufacturing high performance air filters for the last 30 years. They have an impressive list of clients, including Ariel, Ascari, Aston Martin, KTM, Mercury Marine Racing Division, NISMO, Renault Sport, Seat Sport, VW Racingline.

http://itgairfilters.com/clients/

They seem to be involved a lot in motorsports, including FIA F1 championship teams, BTCC, British and World Super bikes, Le Mans Series and WRC.

ITG | High Performance Automotive Air Filters

To cut the story short, I’ve got curious about them when I’ve read about their philosophy and the fact that they also offer completely closed air systems.
“ITG fully road test all prototypes to prove their durability and performance, and each kit is tested on the rolling road to fully enhance it’s capabilities for that particular car. This means we are able to offer power and torque graphs for each kit we supply. “

Their filters are made of a proprietary Tri-Foam System which, according to them, offers better filtration compared to paper and cotton:

http://itgairfilters.com/technology/


I was therefore wondering if you’ve ever heard of them?

I’m thinking of trying to adapt one of their Maxogen kits to my Mazda:



Boxed Air Filters Carbon | Maxogen | ITG

(I’ve contacted them for a custom kit, but they said they generally sell kits in bulk/ large numbers, and they didn’t think they’d sell many for a Mazda 3).

What do you think?


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Seems to me that in order to get any sort of power gains by means of an aftermarket intake it would have to be designed to correct an existing airflow deficiency or restriction, which there isn't really. As a matter of fact, the stock parts work just fine as far as performance goes. The exorbitant cost that comes with some of those fancy bling intakes doesn't justify the minimal gains. A couple hp isn't a huge difference and any such gains may or may not be within the range of error of the dyno anyhow. The only real value would be if it could reduce IATs and resist heat soak.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The only real value would be if it could reduce IATs and resist heat soak.

You’re speaking Chinese to me - what do you mean?

Tbh, every little helps, and some gains are not that little (for example, the Borla Type S exhaust offers a gain of ~20BHP on the 2.5litre - I’ve contacted Borla directly who confirmed it).

With regards to the air induction, how do you know if there is or there isn’t a restriction?

I agree, though, that’s not worth the trouble investing a lot in something which only offers a gain of 2-3 BHP.



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Seems to me that in order to get any sort of power gains by means of an aftermarket intake it would have to be designed to correct an existing airflow deficiency or restriction, which there isn't really. As a matter of fact, the stock parts work just fine as far as performance goes. The exorbitant cost that comes with some of those fancy bling intakes doesn't justify the minimal gains. A couple hp isn't a huge difference and any such gains may or may not be within the range of error of the dyno anyhow. The only real value would be if it could reduce IATs and resist heat soak.
Agree. The BM/BN stock intake is well designed & doesn't leave much to gain from available options out there.

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You’re speaking Chinese to me - what do you mean?
Any given volume of air has a certain amount of oxygen content. Hot air is less dense than cold air, so that volume of hot air has less oxygen than a similar volume of colder air. The MAF sensor detects this change and adjusts fuel flow accordingly. As a result, high intake temps result in less fuel / air mix going into the engine, which means less power.
If the car is moving slowly or stopped with the engine running, the stuff under the hood gets heated up more than it would if at highway speeds. Eventually the intake gets hot enough to pass those temps on to the air going into the engine. Hot air means less power, so keeping intake temps down and delaying or preventing the effects of heat soak is good. The SRI intakes that use a pod filter with no enclosure are especially prone to sucking in hot underhood air. :surprise:

Tbh, every little helps, and some gains are not that little (for example, the Borla Type S exhaust offers a gain of ~20BHP on the 2.5litre - I’ve contacted Borla directly who confirmed it).
20hp? Where did that come from? That sounds like typical ad copy that gives the same percentage increase across the product line. Are there any actual independent dyno tests that back this up?

With regards to the air induction, how do you know if there is or there isn’t a restriction?
There has been some dyno testing in the past that indicates aftermarket intakes don't do a whole lot. The engine will only suck in so much air, and wide open SRI intakes that present zero restriction make no real improvements over stock.
When I checked my Injen intake with and without the CS cold air box in place vs stock, there was no difference in airflow as reported by the cars sensors.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
20hp? Where did that come from? That sounds like typical ad copy that gives the same percentage increase across the product line. Are there any actual independent dyno tests that back this up?

Sorry, my mistake. I’ve checked the email I received some time ago and it’s an increase of 10bhp and 10Nm. I only have the graph for the power curve. I think it’s still a significant increase.



Would an aftermarket intake not offer more tuning potential?

Why did you fit the Injen CAI if it makes no difference?




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I've used ITG pod filters in the past and had good experiences with them.
In regards to their enclosed system, the ODULA as shown will do the same thing and already has provisions for outside air ingestion.
The enclosed ITG system will need further ducting to provide fresh air.

That said, the ITG system looks super sexy...what can I say Im a sucker for velocity stacks
 

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I've used ITG pod filters in the past and had good experiences with them.
In regards to their enclosed system, the ODULA as shown will do the same thing and already has provisions for outside air ingestion.
The enclosed ITG system will need further ducting to provide fresh air.

That said, the ITG system looks super sexy...what can I say Im a sucker for velocity stacks


It’s the first time I’ve heard of Odula. I’m not sure where could I order their kit from, it seemed much more expensive and obscure than the ITG alternative.

And I’d rather get a product made by a company who’s only doing that sort of products, rather than a whole lot of aftermarket upgrades.

Maybe I’ll just get the ITG replacement filter for the stock airbox. That’s only £50 or so.


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Sorry, my mistake. I’ve checked the email I received some time ago and it’s an increase of 10bhp and 10Nm. I only have the graph for the power curve. I think it’s still a significant increase.
Never believe manufacturers claims, ever. They exist to move product, period. Nobody would buy a product that costs over $600 and does nothing. Get an independent source for real world numbers.

Would an aftermarket intake not offer more tuning potential?

Why did you fit the Injen CAI if it makes no difference?
More potential only if you make mechanical changes. The tune only changes operating parameters in the ECU. You can't force more air into the engine. If the OEM intake is capable of flowing enough air already, no aftermarket part, no matter how carefully designed, will do better.

I have the Injen for other reasons. It sounds better, it looks better, and with an enclosure and some other work lower intake temperatures are possible.
 

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Yeah when it comes to the air intake, really the best way to go is stock. You can replace the air filter with a HKS sports one or K&N if you want to "feel" like it's more performance oriented. But at the end of the day, it's still an econobox.

A very lovable econobox, none the less though.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Yeah when it comes to the air intake, really the best way to go is stock. You can replace the air filter with a HKS sports one or K&N if you want to "feel" like it's more performance oriented. But at the end of the day, it's still an econobox.

A very lovable econobox, none the less though.


This topic aside, I’m not quite sure what people mean when they keep throwing the word “econobox” around.

What is an econobox are what are the criteria for a car to be defined as such? I’m pretty sure this isn’t a well defined idea (and definitely not a concept).

I personally think of performance as a spectrum, rather than a split, black and white type of categories (ie: high performance vs “econobox”).

The stock version of the car would sit at one end and the maximum performance version of the same car would sit at the other end. And most cars would be somewhere in between. (And even so, some stock versions are more basic than others.)

I think it’s a lovely designed lightweight car, with beautiful driving dynamics and lots of potential for greatness. I don’t see it as an “econobox”.




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This topic aside, I’m not quite sure what people mean when they keep throwing the word “econobox” around.

What is an econobox are what are the criteria for a car to be defined as such? I’m pretty sure this isn’t a well defined idea (and definitely not a concept).
To me, an econobox is your average non-performance oriented sub $20k new MSRP vehicle aimed at high MPG and reliability. Vehicles that fit this category would be the NA Golf, Jetta, Focus, any Hyundai really, Dart, Cruze, ForTwo smart cars, etc. Sure, you can throw some performance mods at it and get a little more performance out of it but at the end of the day if you're looking for a vehicle that responds better to performance mods and has more aftermarket support, you should look into turbo variants of these vehicles if applicable (except the Cruze, no one wants a Cruze). Everyone has their own opinion of what fits the "econobox" term though.

Just because I personally think a vehicle is an econobox doesn't mean I think it's worthless in any demerit though. I love my little Mazda3, and it makes for a great daily driver. When I first got it, I wanted to make it go fast and throw every performance mod I could think of at it like a new header, full exhaust, air intake, camshafts, etc. But realistically it does exactly what it should, make a great daily that gets awesome MPG and stays reliable at the same time (unless you're like me and your auto transmission is slipping at 30k).

I personally think of performance as a spectrum, rather than a split, black and white type of categories (ie: high performance vs “econobox”).
I agree with you, some vehicles blur the lines between econobox and high performance. But I don't believe the Mazda3 is one of them. Comfort? It fits the bill for most of my requirements except for these cloth seats. Visual appeal? Absolutely, if you take away the piano black plastics from the equation. Fuel economy? Out of all 14 vehicles I've owned in my life, this one gets the absolute best MPG so hell yes on this section. Performance? That's where you lose me. But everyone also has their own idea of what's "fast" and what's "slow". So what I might find fast like my old 454 C10, you might consider slow since it's a truck with an old boat motor 454, no matter how much money it had in it.

As long as you're happy with your vehicle and it's modifications, that's all that matters. People will label it everyday however they please. Stickerbomb spoiler? Rice. Rally lights? Rice. MazdaSpeed badge covering a few holes in the hatch of a Mazda3? D E S E C R A T E R.
 

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Hi Thanks for this insight into something different and possibly better flow than my corksport air filter.

I was looking at getting a second cone ....(clean one let dry , install the dry ) so i dont have down time.
Correct though about the subsequent discussion about increased air flow ...if it is hot air doesnt really add hp ... hence why the goal is to tap into the air outside the engine bay. And if the exhaust flowing out of the engine is slowed down and/or constricted (ie : most OEM exhausts ) you may not really be adding much with just a CAI.
 
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