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I have a 2016 Mazda 3 hatchback (2.0 L automatic). It’s currently at around 1,700 miles.

The past 2 times I’ve filled my gas, I’ve gotten 30.6 mpg (254 miles) and 30.26 mpg (270 miles). I did a decent amount of short distance, street-only driving, but I drove to and from work on the freeway (20 miles in each direction) 5 times before I filled my gas both times. When I drive on the freeway, I usually go about 75-80 mph, if traffic allows it.

Why is my gas mileage so low? Is it normal to get such a low gas mileage in these situations? When I was breaking the engine in, I drove around 65-70 mph on the freeway and got 33 mpg.
 

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The below thread has a lot of information on what other owners have been getting. Hopefully it helps you start to answer your question. And while I do not understand why your mileage has recently dropped (except for the remote possibility of colder weather and winter blend gas if you have it, and/or more/slower traffic), cars will tend to keep getting better mileage until at least 5,000 miles, some not finished breaking/getting better mileage in until a couple more thousand after that.

http://mazda3revolution.com/forums/...9-highway-mpg-thread-both-2-0-2-5-w-poll.html
 

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Your around town mileage won't be so good. I usually get 28 or so without doing any highway miles. It got up to 32 on the long term average screen a couple days ago after some time on the highway.
 

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I was consistently getting 40+ pretty easily on the highway if I stayed below 75. On a recent trip to South Houston (about 700 miles round trip) I was cruising at 80-85 and struggled to get 35 out of it. The magic number for me seemed to be 72mph. Incidentally even in heavy stop and go traffic my full tank average has never been lower than about 34mpg, and mine was fully tuned for hp. What helped me the most was setting the display on "current mpg" and I drove in a manner that kept it higher for longer. The car barely sips gas while cruising, and dips in pretty heavily while accelerating, be it slowly or heavy footed acceleration. My method is "get to cruising speed swiftly and stay there longer".

Oh, and run good gas. I got into some crummy gas on a recent road trip and the exact same stretch of road saw a 6mpg drop.
 

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At freeway speeds, I definitely get 40+ MPG. However, in my daily commute, I'm always stuck in traffic so my average speed is around 16mph (according to Google Maps) and my average MPG for the trip drops significantly due to the constant acceleration to the 20s range. It also depends on how aggressively you drive; constantly accelerating aggressively will cause a large MPG drop.
 

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I have the 2.5 (2017 model year) and so far with about 800 miles my ave is 26mpg. I new the 2.5 was to be a couple or so worse in mpg but honestly thought I'd see 30 and not yet happen.

My commute to work is 88 miles round trip. Most of which is highway, however even though city is the minority of the driving miles it is often bumper to bumper. And I spend as much time in the few miles driven while getting into, being in, and getting out of Manhattan as I do the other 75 miles on the highway. I am doing 75 to 80 when the highway traffic allows. Often times its 60ish or so and sometimes traffic slows on the highways too and is mixed with some heavier accelerating as I pass others when I can.

So overall I'm working the engine lets say fairly hard on the highway and "not so fuel friendly" and then of course the heavy traffic city portions just kills the mpg too.

I mean Im barely averaging the posted city miles and that's with most of my driven commuting miles on the highway. But I suppose those numbers were never really meant to suggest real city bump to bump type of traffic but perhaps only more like local "around town" driving where one is at least moving along. The big city traffic jams is just killing the total average even though most the mileage is highway. For me I suppose I can only blame the big city fuel killer traffic for the most part.

That all said, I still don't seem to do that well even around my home town nor do I see how some people get such high mileage unless you constantly baby the drive with a continuous very cautious awareness of it. But I just cant drive that way
 

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I've been driving to work with extremely heavy bumper to bumper traffic in the mornings, and mostly zero traffic on my way back home from work cruising @ 70mph
11 Miles each way

My average is 33 mpg with an average speed of 27mph lol, the smooth way back home balances out the stop and go in the mornings

The car tells me I do 40+ on my way back home cruising

my schedule is going to change soon and both ways should have no traffic, so I'll reset the average. I'm expecting I'll get at least 40 average then
 

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I get 24/20 mpg getting from/to work in the city on the 2.5L, measured consistently over 2 weeks+. Commute is 7 miles 1-way, taking 30 min, so average speed is 14mph lol. And that's driving gently; going faster will be about 2 mpg lower.

In comparison, my 2014 Honda Fit did 30/26 mpg going to/from work, so the Mazda's performing as advertised afaik.

I get 30-32 mpg going 80-90 mph on freeway-only driving, but it's said it's roughly 25% less efficient - http://www.mpgforspeed.com/ Also, freeways around here in the Bay Area still have inclines which don't help.
 

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Are you guys using the number from the trip computer or manually doing the calculation with the odometer? I find my trip computer is always wrong, sometimes higher and sometimes lower.
 

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The best learning tools anyone can use to improve fuel economy for any/every situation is to:

• use the "CURRENT MPG" dashboard readout, and
• also use the "FUEL ECONOMY MONITOR"

When I picked up my new 2.5L Mazda3 in Los Angeles and drove it 105 miles back to San Diego, I averaged 41.3 MPG. About 15 miles was in heavy city traffic, and the rest was with the radar cruise set to 65 MPH (AC 100% of the time).

As someone correctly pointed out, "babying" or "grannying" the car is not a good fuel-savings strategy. Briskly getting up to a steady cruising speed of 45-70 MPH, and then coasting (foot OFF the gas) as much as possible when decelerating, will net you significant gains in fuel economy.

Use the two fuel monitors to find the sweet spots, and see where you're giving up MPGs needlessly.
 

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I got 47mpg on a drive home one time, mostly highway, with about maybe 3 miles downhill lol This is with a 2.5. But usually on my way to work I get 33.5 mpg and on my way home I get about 35'ish, 16'ish miles each way. These readings really depends on terrain and traffic. Everybody's mileage will vary.

 

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Are you guys using the number from the trip computer or manually doing the calculation with the odometer? I find my trip computer is always wrong, sometimes higher and sometimes lower.
I have done the math. Usually its around 28 or so. Not far off from what the computer says.
 

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I been using both the cars computer and also keeping track myself via gallons/mileage. And they are within a couple mpg of each other. I think mostly because it depends how much gas gets topped off on the fill up. Sometimes none is squeezed in and other times could be half gallon to make an even price number,lol. But still they are fairly even.

But I been terrible at about 25mpg. My last fill this morning wasn't even 24mpg for the last 214 miles. But to be fair I been hitting a lot of traffic lately. Even this mornings commute raining and all I was in traffic the whole 44 miles into work. Even the highway had several crawling traffic situations. More than normal which is what happens this holiday time of year. Just sooo many people running around xmass shopping and all. Even the lighter traffic days and times are worse off in December.

Im just going to have to wait till I can get some better open type of driving to see what this car has to offer fuel economy wise. But for my first 1000 miles I have little to nothing to speak of thus far and even disappointed. But again I understand the traffic situation is killing me.
 

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My last two fill-ups have gotten progressively worse mpg - 28 and 25, respectively. It was consistently 30 previously. I'm hoping it's coinciding with the drop in temperature and not with the accident that kept it in the shop for two months.
 

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Well my gas mpg is bad with the winter gas being used in Atlanta, I was getting 29 same route getting 26.
 

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For highway cruising, speed is a huge factor. Going 5mph slower from 80 down to 75 has more impact on fuel economy than 75 down to 70. At 80mph, shaving 5 mph off your cruising speed can net you up to a few mpg in some cars.

The other very big factor is how one drives. Braking is the act of dumping kinetic energy into the brakes as heat. That's dumping the energy you got by burning fuel. The more you can anticipate traffic movement in front of you and avoid unnecessary acceleration and braking, the higher mpg you'll be able to get. Things like having a little more buffer room to the car in front and driving by watching 2 or 3 cars ahead really can help smooth things out. All about that anticipation and planning.

If you spent a ton of fuel going from 60 to 80 to make up for a gap in front, then end up having to brake due to flow of traffic being at 60mph, then you've not only burned all that fuel to gain kinetic energy for nothing, but you've also had to burn more fuel to counter the higher air resistance at higher speed in that stretch of road.

In essence, the less total input of throttle and brake, the better fuel economy you'd get. Braking is fine as long as you didn't waste fuel to go unnecessarily fast and won't waste fuel immediately trying to get that speed back.
 

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Yep, the type of driving has very much to do with what the miles-per-gallon will be for any given vehicle.

The principles of this have already been well covered here.

In my case, when I drive strictly in the city, my mileage is in the 20s. When I drive strictly on the highway, my mileage is in the 40s (as much as 47 mpg on long-distance trips under favorable conditions). The EPA's mileage ratings pretty much predict that.

I happen to use my Mazda3 just about exclusively on the highway, between 55 and 70 mph. I try to keep it closer to 55 than to 70, depending on traffic and related conditions. As a result, my long-term mileage is about 43 mpg over the 21,000 miles that I have driven this car so far, even with the air conditioner compressor basically running all the time.
 

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Ethanol fuel and city driving have left me in the 24.0 - 26.5 mpg range for all but a tank or two. '16 S GT 5 door with three pedals. I could drive it like a grandma in a Prius and would likely get 27.0, but that just seems like a waste of effort.
 

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I've had tanks under 28mpg. All city driving.

I've ONLY had 2 tanks in 2 years of ownership above 40.

My average over 90+ fillups is 34.1.

EPA average combined MPG rating for a 2.0L Mazda3 is 34.


I honestly don't think about it any more, other than to track it. I know in the winter with my roof rack and snow tires it will be rough, and I know in the summer with standard tires I'll be hitting the 38-39 range on big trips. It all averages out in the end.

Sure beats the hell out of 17mpg 2-year average in my previous 4Runner.
 
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