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If you are looking for a mod to install on your own, the aluminum foot rest and pedal pads are a good choice. You can save money online vs. dealer price, plus you can saver the install labor cost.

The foot rest and accelerator pedal are pretty straight-forward--follow the directions and you should do just fine. But the break pedal pad is very difficult to install. I was unable to install it the 'correct' way, and came up with this effective method. I will be writing about the break pedal pad for automatic transmission and it may or may not apply to the version for manual transmission.

Before we get started, some disclaimers:

- Try using the supplied instructions first. If you are successful, great.
- This method of installation is permanent. If you think you might one day want to remove it, DO NOT follow this guide.
- This method of installation requires alteration to the part. Do not expect it to be covered by warranty down the road.
- Read all instructions BEFORE starting the procedure. Make sure you understand them.

Supplies and tools needed:

- BHN1-V9-093, 2014 Mazda 3 Alloy Brake Pedal for Automatic Transmission
- Heavy duty scissors or some appropriate cutting tool
- Amazing Goop or similar contact cement adhesive

Step 1:

Since you have attempted the regular installation method, you know how hard it is to get the pad on the pedal. We are going to make this easier by cutting at the rubber edge. Start by making a cut into each corner. See picture one below for reference.

Step 2:

Cut along the bottom edge (the shorter of the two parallel long edges) so as to remove the overhanging lip. Do not remove the 'side wall' because we need it to line the part up properly. See the second picture below for reference.

Step 3:

Try to put the pad on the pedal. With your modifications to the part, it should go on fairly easy. If you are still having trouble, cut away some of the lip in the bottom corners and up the sides. Make small changes and continue applying the pad to the pedal until you are able to place it onto the pedal fully in a few seconds.

Step 4:

Practice putting the altered pedal pad onto the metal pedal. You should be able to place it fully on in only a few seconds. When placed fully, it should be seated flat on the pedal with the top and sides covered with the rubber 'overhangs.' The bottom edge of the pedal should be covered by the remaining rubber edge on the bottom. This is important because the adhesive, once bonded, is fairly permanent. So practice until you are confident you can apply the part correctly.

Step 5:

Make sure the rubber surface of the pedal pad and the surface of the brake pedal are clean and dry.

Step 6:

Apply a thin layer of Amazing Goop or similar adhesive to the pedal pad. Apply three lines of the adhesive:

- one along the bottom edge (the edge with the most cutting done)
- one along the right edge
- one along the left edge

Please refer to the third picture as to what the pattern should look like. It is important not to place adhesive along the top edge because when applying the pad, you start with that edge and do not want it to bond before you have it in place.

Step 7:

Apply a thin layer of adhesive on the brake pedal in the same pattern as in step 6. Refer to picture 4 below.

Step 8:

WAIT two minutes for the adhesive to set up (or a different amount of time, according to the adhesive's instructions.

Step 9:

As you practiced, apply the pedal pad to the brake pedal. It is recommended you start with the top edge and then pull out the side edges as needed to fit. Press firmly down on the pedal pad so it is flush with the pedal. Make sure all the metal edges of the pedal are either covered by a rubber overhang or sitting on the inside edge of the rubber.

Step 10:

With the pedal pad applied fully and correctly, wait 10-15 minutes for the adhesive to really bond (or however long the instructions say if using a different adhesive). Pull up on the bottom edge of the pad to make sure it is secure before using.

Congratulations! If everything went well, you now have the break pedal pad installed. See picture 5 below.

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns. Again, this guide is not for everyone, but if you really want to install the part yourself, this is an easy way to do it.
 

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I got it on halfway and then used a flat piece of metal to lever the overlapped area. Took a good 20 minutes of trying over and over again. The soaking in detergent part of the instruction doesn't do anything. It's better to soak it in warm/hot water to soften the rubber before installing it. Like OP says, it is difficult to install.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I got it on halfway and then used a flat piece of metal to lever the overlapped area. Took a good 20 minutes of trying over and over again. The soaking in detergent part of the instruction doesn't do anything. It's better to soak it in warm/hot water to soften the rubber before installing it. Like OP says, it is difficult to install.
Yeah. It's good you got it on the right way. I tried soaking it in warm water with Dawn. It helped a little, but I was not strong enough to get it on. When I was done trying, my hands were very sore. But I got it on now :)

While the glue is fairly permanent, the foot rest and accelerator pedals are too. Sure, you can unscrew them, but you have holes in the carpet and pedal.
 

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It also took me a good 20 minutes to instal the pedals on the clutch and brake pedals. Man did Mazda make it difficult!
I was a bit worried at first, but I had confidence in my hand strength and I went ahead and put on my aluminum brake pedal without soaking. Took me about five minutes but boy, that hurts the fingers. I didn't find the method of prying it on with a screwdriver to be much help but I just wedged in my finger and slid along the side.
 

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Is that foot rest have a backing, or does the holes expose the carpet...kinda of cheezy...
Holes exposed to the carpet. There's a backing plate that goes under the carpet though.
 

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Plus, pretty much the only way you'd ever be able to tell it was holes exposed to the carpet is if you looked up close with a flashlight.
HI I have just purchased the aluminium pedals and the only one I cannot come to grips with is the foot rest. Can you please explain to me how you secured the nut plate to the carpet.
Thanks
regards Vic
 

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1. Take off the parts as shown in the instructions,
2. Mark the spot for the holes,
3. Cut the holes,
4. Hold the nut plate on the underside of the carpet
5. Putting the screws through the footrest, one at a time, line up the screws with the holes in the nutplate and tighten.
6. Replace parts in reverse order.
 

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What I did was align the dead pedal to where I wanted then drilled a hole into both of the specific hole locations and aligned the back plate under the carpet like that. I didn't have a drill or knife to cut through the carpet so I used a wood screw and screw driver to make the holes. Put a pencil through the hole to expand it enough to put the screws provided through.
 

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HI I have just purchased the aluminium pedals and the only one I cannot come to grips with is the foot rest. Can you please explain to me how you secured the nut plate to the carpet.
Thanks
regards Vic
I installed this the way another user here has.

I didn't want to go removing trim and stuff (I am not good at stuff like that) so what I did was bought industrial Velcro and attached it (the hook side) to the back of the mounting plate. I then placed the mounting plate where I wanted it (the industrial Velcro holds extremely well) and placed the aluminum rest in place. Instead of using the screws included I went to Home Depot and bought two screws of the same width and thread, but with a pointed tip and they were a tad longer and stainless steel (so they won't rust). I screwed the aluminum rest down and it hasn't moved since.


Here is the thread where I got this idea from:
http://mazda3revolution.com/forums/2014-mazda-3-skyactiv-appearance-interior/45969-mazda-aluminum-foot-rest-3.html
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I considered that way but thought I'd give the standard install a shot. It's way easier that it looks.
Yes the standard installation for the footrest is very easy. It is much easier than the brake or accelerator pedal installs.
 

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So.. there are already holes underneath the carpet or am I mistaken?

Also... are the OEM's the only one that come with the back mounting plate? OR do the chinese made ones come with them too?
 

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There aren't any holes under the carpet. You're putting only the carpet between the footrest and the nut plate.

As dew111 says, it's the easiest of the the pedal installs. The brake pedal, which seems easiest on paper, was the biggest pain. It took my fingertips a day to recover!
 

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I'm finding no footrest on my manual transmission to be a huge PIA. But The access to do it also is a major pain.

What is the thought of just using an epoxy to glue it to the carpet and be done with it?

I'd love the metal pedals, but all this talk of hassles getting them on seems like it might be a waste of time (given it is a lease)
 

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Anyone know if this brake pedal (BHN1-V9-093) will fit on other years? I have a 2012 and I really hate the cheapo pedal I put on it awhile back.
 

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At long last, after struggling like all do to install the alloy pedal covers, I succeeded.

I had thought about using slippery gels (but rejected that as messy and then losing grip to pull and pry the covers over the metal pedal backing plate. Then thought about cutting a backside corner of the rubber (and rejected that as not as secure/safe).

The method that worked best for me was to put on the top part by sliding it downward, then to heat the whole pedal cover with a hair dryer for about three minutes at high heat, then used a 90 degree trim tool to reach behind and pry outward the rubber edges while using the other hand to push the cover downward onto the metal pedal backing plate. Still took about 20 minutes each for the brake and clutch pedals, but well worth it. Damn, my finger tips are still sore.

These covers are a major improvement over the OEM black rubber coverings.
 

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