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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

First post on mazda3revolution...and this appears to be the forum in which to post this:

I'm taking the wife's 2015 MZ3 to a pair of heavy-braking race tracks this summer and have yet to locate any motorsport-level brake pads for the car. I'm guessing that even something modest like one of Hawk's street/"track" pads would be better than the OEMs. I'll be instructing in the car for the most part, but will want to run at least a handful of hot laps at each track: Watkins Glen and Le Circuit Mont Tremblant. The tires will be DOT-R compound regardless of which pads I run with.

Does anyone know what's available to help this car brake from higher speeds, as well as who is selling them?
FWIW, I'm totally new to Mazdas except for the few hundred Miata hotshoes I've met at race tracks all over the Northeast. :laugh2:

Thanks!
 

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If you're doing a lot of laps temps are probably going to soar. You may want to convert the rubber flex hoses to stainless steel lines and switch a track brake fluid (Motul, etc.).

I have HAWK HPS and they're on par with the OEM, except they have less initial bite. I think they are easier to pedal. I plan to switch to EBC yellow stuff when the Hawks expire.
 

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Admiral Obvious
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am on hawk HP+ pads, they work fairly well once they warm up.

I run Motul RBF600 and SS lines
 

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The Street 5.0s may have part numbers for the 3rd gen. I found conflicting database recommendations from parts websites, tirerack and Hawk's own website. Ultimately I called Hawk, got the part number, then ordered through Tirerack. The poor rep on the phone was hesitant because I was ordering focus/volvo pads according to his database. Review follows:

I have been doing Track Night in America at Thompson on afore mentioned Goodridge SS lines + Motul RBF 600. The first time there I was using old Motul+Hawk HPS and the second time there I was using their newer (HPS phase-in replacement) Street Performance 5.0 with fresh fluid. I had performed the bed-in procedure and placed at least a couple hundred miles on the 5.0s, so I consider them broken-in.

The HPS (~70k miles) provided adequate stopping power for me. My tach and speedo disagree, so at the end of the straight I am anywhere from 100~109- basically end of the revs in 4th, OEM tire size. The would be a bit soft for the first turns after that, so I would try to not use them for the first left so they would be cool for the hard right hairpin. After that they apparently had plenty of time to cool; I never had any issues with repeating that exact process lap after lap. Returning to the street after that they were a bit glazed....over the next few (~3) days I babied them and did a few controlled moderately aggressive street stops and that returned the feel to normal.

The HPS was on par with OEM as far as stopping power, but had a bit less initial bite. I liked that, because I could then dial in just how much braking force I wanted. I suspect their fade resistance is similar. The OEM brakes are just pretty darn good for an econobox (imo). The HPS did have a little less bite when cool but their second application always had plenty of clamping power. The HPS are also prone to the "oh sh*t where are my brakes?" upon the first application after the car wash or many miles on the highway in the rain if you've already bled off most of your speed. If you're still going fast they return almost quickly enough not to notice...but if you've coasted down to <30 you may have a rude awakening as they may take tap-release-brake to get them back.

The Street 5.0s were a much welcomed improvement over my 1/2-2/3s worn HPS. This is also certainly partially attributable to a fluid flush. On the street they are a bit quieter than the HPS were (the HPS had melted in their groove and no doubt held some rocks and squealers). On the track they grip very predictably. I was able to be more aggressive, braking as usual at the end of the straight, but not worrying about babying them on the immediate next corner after that. They earned my confidence very quickly (but this is not a top-end car, so I really don't need all that much). There was no glazing at all, and they immediately had their street manners back for the drive home. The 5.0s dust about 50% more than the HPS. Wear seems the same after a track day each (no significant decrease). I have also done 2 autocrosses on the 5.0s. They come up to temp very quickly and are predictable and consistent enough for me. No fade ever encountered...but hey it's only auto-x. I have not had any butt pucker moments with the 5.0s in wet weather or car-wash situations.

I have not owned a car with HP+. My only experience with them is driving another car (skyactiv mazda3) with them. They take a few elements to warm up, but after that clamp pretty hard...almost too much for auto-x. You really need to have good discipline for braking straight...or maybe they just release too slow for me to start turning in that soon :p Those pads definitely squeal when cold/cool. I think they would be great for track nights...once to temp they would definitely allow more aggressive braking zones, within the limits of the fact it's a mazda3.

Edit: Of the three Hawk pads tried, HPS, 5.0, HP+ I think they would all be fine with OEM-sized rubber. If much more tire is being used then stopping power will of course be increased and higher brake temps will be seen. With 205 Conti DW I can get into ABS with the 5.0s if I want. With 215 Rivals I don't think that would be likely above, guessing, 30mph. If you're running more tire, then go with more pad, certainly. The HP+ at temp would probably be able to get to ABS on the streetable tires I've tried.

I can't really speak to long-term rotor wear other than the HPS had decently mild manners. We will see what the 5.0s hold. Again not owning HP+ for the long term, no idea.

Summarily I've found a basic aftermarket pad coupled with good fluid (and possibly lines) should hold up well to a casual (non-wheel-to-wheel race) track day. Then again I could just drive like a Sunday grandma stereotype...dunno.

Currently my brake dilemma involves getting the pads to seat so they don't clunk the first time you apply the brakes when changing direction..forward or reverse, and researching a high-temp caliper grease. The Hawk stuff clogged the slide pins. Going to try Napa Sil-Glyde and/or permatex anti-seize next.
 

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The Turbo Guy
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Currently my brake dilemma involves getting the pads to seat so they don't clunk the first time you apply the brakes when changing direction..forward or reverse, and researching a high-temp caliper grease. The Hawk stuff clogged the slide pins. Going to try Napa Sil-Glyde and/or permatex anti-seize next.
The Hawk grease is for the back of the pads.

CRC disc brake quiet red goop on the back of the pad
CRC caliper grease on the slider pins and where the pad slides on the caliper
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
If you're doing a lot of laps temps are probably going to soar. You may want to convert the rubber flex hoses to stainless steel lines and switch a track brake fluid (Motul, etc.).
I agree! Before putting a car on the track, I always ensure that it has fresh (or freshly-bled) high-temp brake fluid, as well as having SS lines installed.

I couldn't find any high temperature brake pads for gen3.
I never could either, gave up, and finally ordered a set made for me in the Raybestos ST-43 compound by Porterfield (racebrakes.com). Pricey, of course, but not crazy: Fronts - $289; and, Rears - $189.
 

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Track Rat
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Carbotech makes race pads now.
 
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