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*The Electrician*
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Discussion Starter #1
Winter is here, the snow is flying, and playful oversteer is great fun in an empty parking lot. Unfortunately I am having trouble finding playful oversteer from my Mazda 3 and want to try and pinpoint why. Yes FWD, understeer ect ect, but one of my previous cars an Acura RSX, never had issues finding some playful oversteer in the snow. Im running the most aggressive studded tires Ive ever run before so that's one side of it. My tire pressures are set to OEM spec 36psi approximately, haven't actually checked yet since this dump of snow. I have an upgraded rear swaybar set to the highest stiffness as well. Ive tried a few times but the back end is very very firmly planted, not exactly a bad thing, but Im hoping to find a little bit of rotation. I usually can find it with simply throttle lift oversteer or turn in and tap the brakes to loosen the back end, but alas my Mazda doesn't want to rotate on the snow. Should I try the softer setting on my rear swaybar? I would have thought the stiffer setting would encourage more oversteer but I am coming up short. Is there interference from G-Vectoring perhaps? Traction and stability are off, I never use them, and I never had issues finding rotation on gravel so Im curious why its not working with snow. Im puzzled.
 

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The G Vectoring system wouldn't interfere with that. Going to the softer setting won't help, it would most certainly make it worse. Chances are the biggest reason is those tires. I bet the Acura had a different F/R spring rate ratio also, ie more spring in the rear. That can make a difference in weight transfer.
 

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*The Electrician*
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
The G Vectoring system wouldn't interfere with that. Going to the softer setting won't help, it would most certainly make it worse. Chances are the biggest reason is those tires. I bet the Acura had a different F/R spring rate ratio also, ie more spring in the rear. That can make a difference in weight transfer.
Your probably right about the Acura, it loved to oversteer on command on gravel, the Mazda I've had to work a bit harder to find the slip points but still could always find them when I wanted it. I guess I will have to work double hard in snow to find these slip points. Im considering altering tire pressures too, less up front and more in the rear, see if that helps a bit.

UPDATE

Dropped fronts to 30PSI, raised rears to 38PSI, and dabbled with clutch kicking, might be onto something there.
 

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Try the Scandinavian flick, which a quick turn away from the direction of your intended turn right before you turn in. I don't understand why it works, but rally drivers have been doing it for years.
 

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My guess? Maybe your rear camber is much higher relative to your front? Or perhaps you have aftermarket springs installed that are very stiff? That could prevent the sway bar from being able to lift the inside wheel.
 

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*The Electrician*
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Discussion Starter #6
My guess? Maybe your rear camber is much higher relative to your front? Or perhaps you have aftermarket springs installed that are very stiff? That could prevent the sway bar from being able to lift the inside wheel.
Alignment and suspension are completely OEM except for the rear swaybar upgrade.

Try the Scandinavian flick, which a quick turn away from the direction of your intended turn right before you turn in. I don't understand why it works, but rally drivers have been doing it for years.

yup very aware of the flick, it somewhat helps but still not getting the desired results.
 

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I had a 1979 VW Rabbit and I could oversteer it just by cranking the wheels full lock, then jamming my brakes, all with the gas pedal down the whole time. That thing would spin180 right in its own lane, as calm as could be. I really miss that.

I think modern cars are too heavy, with too much weight back, and too much electronic controls to do that stuff so easily.
 
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