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Are you allowing the oil to drain before you check it? If you shut it off, pop the hood, and pull the dipstick without waiting, it's going to read a little low.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Are you allowing the oil to drain before you check it? If you shut it off, pop the hood, and pull the dipstick without waiting, it's going to read a little low.
The manual says to run the car until it's at "full operating temperature," turn of the engine, wait five minutes, and then check the oil -- on level ground, of course. That's exactly what I've been doing.

When I told the service advisor that I was down about 1/2 quart after 2100 miles, he went over and checked the oil level himself... and got the same reading that I did. By the time he checked the oil, the car had been sitting for about 10 minutes.
 

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Seriously, I downshift for hills all the time in my autotragic actually the car will do it for me if I don't. So I know it's not the downshifting that's the cause for your oil consumption. But like I said, go through inspections etc. You are on the right track. Sounds like you are getting a new motor.
 

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Without being able to see the engine first hand it's tough to try to help with a diagnosis. I still think one of the piston rings isn't properly seated and the engine is burning a small amount of oil - but it adds up over time. Not sure if it's worth Mazda's or your time to tear apart the engine to fix this, versus one or two days for an engine swap.

The only comment I can add to your break in period that I personally do different is letting the engine warm up. I wait about 30 seconds for the engine to start warming up and for oil to start working its way around the engine before I start putting the engine under load. Even still, the engine should be broken in at the factory - otherwise the break in procedure specified by the manufacturer would need to be modified and that's not on the consumer.

Lastly, it's not impossible to get a new car. But you have to follow the lemon law procedures for your state, which is usually a result of the same symptoms even after three repair attempts. If you go this route just make sure you document everything. If Mazda agrees to swap the engine, the issue should be resolved. If they decide to rebuild the engine - keep all the records obviously in case the symptoms re-appear.
 

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It sucks, but I seriously doubt a new motor or new car will be given for a half quart every 2100 miles. I think the current standard is 1 quart every thousand miles is considered acceptable.
 

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Any update to this thread?

I agree that a typical Skyactiv shouldn't be burning much oil, if any at all during the entire oil change interval of 3k, 5k, or longer, depending on your maintenance setting.

Mine stays perfectly full all the way through my 3k oil change interval and I drive it like a stolen rental. It's now modified and tuned, so I rev higher then stock redline and still no issues for me.

Nobody should be told to accept the fact that you're suppose to pop your hood and add oil to your brand new ECONO box every thousand miles or so. It's not a performance car, where some oil usage might be considered as "normal".
 

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Discussion Starter #27
...I drive it like a stolen rental...."
Great line! If everyone drove like that, the world would be a better place.

Thanks for your interest in my oil problem. Here's an update. I went to the dealer a few months ago, and they topped off the oil and started an oil consumption test. They told me to come back in about 1500 miles. Well, sad to say I haven't driving much lately (long story not worth telling) so I've just about driven 1500 miles since then. I'm down about 1/2 quart, which would put my engine into the "quart-of-oil-every-3000-miles" category.

I'm planning to go back to the dealer sometime this week so they can see the oil loss for themselves -- but, as another poster to this thread has pointed out, they'll probably tell me that this rate of oil loss/consumption is "within normal tolerances." I'd be very surprised if they offered to do anything. We'll see.
 

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It's an acceptable oil usage amount, by old 1990s - and mid 2000s engine design. But we're in 2016 where emissions and engine quality should have improved by now.

Think about it, if engine A is putting out only clean fuel combustion byproducts out of the exhaust pipe but engine B is burning some oil which it's at it, obviously engine B is producing more emissions and isn't running as clean as it should, regardless of the previously acceptable oil consumption tolerances.

If we ask 10 skyactiv owners and their engines don't burn any oil, yet yours is sipping a quart every 3k miles, that obviously suggests that something isn't right with the block. Of course it could be considered as normal but it isn't right in my book, especially for this type of efficient engine by design.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Of course it could be considered as normal but it isn't right in my book, especially for this type of efficient engine by design.
I totally agree. I'm also not getting anywhere near the promised MPG. My "combined" mileage -- about 75% freeway and 25% in-town suburban -- is only about 29 MPG. Mazda says that the 2.0 liter with a manual should be getting 33 MPG combined.

Obviously, something's not quite right. I just have to figure out how much time and effort I want to spend fighting this thing. After all, the car still works. All it means is that I'll probably wind up spending more on oil and gas than I should be. When you compare that to all the crap that's going in the world right now, my Mazda problem doesn't seem all that bad. (Trying to be philosophical here!)

[Or I could sell the damn thing and buy myself a nice little Golf GTI. 210 HP! Yum!]
 

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Good luck at the dealer man. I do hope they take care of you. Note that Mazda has put a recent emphasis on owner loyalty, so perhaps you'll benefit in this situation. Let's all hope so.

This thread reminds me, I need to check my oil. Slacked off after being convinced the car was not an oil burner after first 1k or so. I agree we should not be burning significant amounts of oil in this day and age, but if I were to run the oil dry due to not checking it frequently enough, even if there were a warranty issue, that'd be my own Damn fault. And I do downshift often lately practicing heel-toe.
 

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bye-bye-VW, there is a school of thought amongst some engine fanatics that an engine should be broken-in using a "tough love" approach. That is, drive the thing like you're in a race. Such folks feel that unless the car is driven like this for a while, the rings will never really seat properly and the car will use too much oil.

I personally have never done this, possessing a more gentle philosophy. But, if I had a new car that seems to be burning more oil than others, I would be tempted to do a few wide-open-throttle runs (not exceeding speed limits or safe driving rules, of course) just to see if my rings could be seated a little better into their grooves, so to speak.

Of course, doing this wouldn't help your desire for better fuel economy during the test period. For the long-run fuel economy, you want egg-under-the-foot throttle control and slow-and-steady-wins-the-race driving. That's the ticket there.
 

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You need to stay on it with the dealer. keep consistently going and letting them document the issue.
You are under warranty and Mazda will fix the issue eventually. They are not going to give you a new car right away or engine.
My buddy has a 2013 mazda 3 that is having his engine replaced at 54k miles. Mazda did other work before coming to the conclusion the engine needs to be replaced. Same engine I got a 2.5 but different body style pretty much. Mazda has not told him what caused the engine to fail other than something with cylinder 3. Which this has come up before with FI's or mazdaspeeds.
My take is something is possibly wrong with your PCV system. Possibly partial stuck PCV causing excess oil consumption. Or defect in the engine build at factory. You get faulty new parts sometimes, it happens. Just keep calm and keep on mazda. Very frustrating when you have issues with anything new.
I am about to throw an OCC on my ride and start watching numbers on my ultragauage. I did this with my speed and gonna do it now with this car. I think they did not improve on the PCV system much for 14+ and it is a weak point.
Be interesting to see what mazda finds. All the best with getting this issue fixed.
 

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bye-bye-VW, there is a school of thought amongst some engine fanatics that an engine should be broken-in using a "tough love" approach. That is, drive the thing like you're in a race. Such folks feel that unless the car is driven like this for a while, the rings will never really seat properly and the car will use too much oil.

I can vouch for this approach. And if you think about how piston rings work, this makes perfect sense.

I beat the hell outta all my new cars and none have had oil burning issues even though my friends who had the same model did have oil burning going on. Coincidence? who knows...

It might be late to fix the issue for the OP but it's definitely worth a shot.

I would start by first fully warming up the engine by doing a typical 15-20 min drive. Then head to the nearest highway with at least 65MPH speed limit and do some 2nd gear WOT (wide open throttle) pulls to redline. Take the next exit, cross the road and get back onto the highway, again going WOT and revving the engine to redline.

Next exit do the same thing but do a full stop and start from 1st gear, then going into 2nd gear, all at WOT.

I can guarantee that probably from the very first highway pull, you'll notice a funky smell in the cabin as the engine burns crap off from the valves, top of the cylinder, even from the exhaust pipe and CAT. This is normal. If done frequently during the car's life, you won't ever get this smell ever again because you'll be constantly burning off a little about of carbon build up during each drive (or every other drive) vs burning off a TON of crap all at once.

Now the best thing you can do is to build up a TON of heat in the entire system by doing back to back pulls to redline and then do a top speed run, so to speak, starting from 1st gear and keep the pedal in the carpet thru 2nd, 3rd, as high as you're comfortable of going. This will build up a ton of pressure and heat in the system.

Now either you'll fack sh!t up and the block will start burning an obscene amount of oil suddenly because the made the piston rings worse and even more oil is now getting past there, or you'll burn off the crap causing them to not sit properly, forcing them to finally sit properly and start keeping oil out of the combustion chamber.

I speak from experience because I had a buddy with an oil burning Honda Accord that was munching on a quart of oil every 1k miles and this method brought consumption down to a quart every 3k and eventually he said he was only adding about half a quart.

Or you can be a pu$$y and complain to the dealership and maybe one of the tech's will fix the problem for you during a "test drive". LOL.
 

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I will be a puss all damn day if it is brand new and has problems. Be smart and don't waste your warranty.

Shiiiit I bought my speed with 29k on it. Problems from the start. Still under warranty. I got the upgraded valve cover, new timing chain and VVT all under warranty done. Fixed my oil leak on the timing cover as well. Saved me some loot. Yours is brand new with 2100 miles on it, so you better not be a puss and make sure mazda fixes that crap.

I would still do what "Must Turbo This 3" said to do and see what happens. Either way it goes your still under warranty and need to make sure mazda stands by it. Maybe doing this will make it worse and really bring the problem to light and then mazda will see what the problem is they need to fix lol.
 

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I know I'm late to the party, but I better chime in here. My 2016 M3 sGT 5-door manual is burning a lot of oil too and it has been since the beginning. I've had it for 9 months and it has 12,500 miles on the clock. I did the 1st oil change at 3000mi and it was down 250ml at that time. Then it consumed 850ml during my 2nd interval of 7500mi. Now, 2000mi into my 3rd interval, it's already down about 300ml, which suggests that consumption will continue at the same rate. I use 4.55 liters (4.8 qts) of Mobil1 synth and M1-108 filter, which are approved for the car. In fact, a lot of Mazda service depts use Mobil1 products.

You're probably wondering why I waited 12,500 miles to report the issue (I have an appt at the dealer on Tue). Well, I was concerned from the start, but I wanted to make sure the issue continued into my 2nd interval with Mobil1 and wasn't just a weird anomaly having to do with switching oils or something. I am meticulous with my cars. I even followed their recommended break in procedure in the manual, although I did occasionally rev it up to 4000, then 5000, then 6000, after 600mi. Anyway, I am not one to accept BS lying down, so I will push the issue hard, if I feel they're not taking it seriously.

By the way, I drive about 100mi per day, 80% highway at 55-70 mph and only occasionally push it hard, and I avg about 36 mpg overall.

Did the OP ever get resolution?
 

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Here`s my experience with mine so far: 2016 3 with manual trans. 2100 miles, not a drop of oil consumed. I drive it fairly spiritedly, baby it on the highway. My combined fuel economy so far is 37mpg, and I`ve gotten nearly 45 out of it on a longer road trip (roughly 500 miles).

Being a former dealership mechanic, I can tell you that there isn`t a new vehicle for sale with zero "miles" on the engine. No, the vehicle may not have gone anywhere under its own power since the engine was installed, but every single engine that goes into a vehicle is put to what amounts to about 1,000 "miles" of run time. Your brand new engine comes broken in.

It sounds like you`re on the right path. Ranting and raving does nothing but slow down the process and make people go to every length they have to make you miserable in the hope you`ll go away (or just elsewhere, if you`re the persistent type). Be concise and direct, but also respectful (which you totally seem to have been). What you can ask for are the service standards that they will use to determine whether your car qualifies for warranty service, and what the standard warranty solution is for that problem. Trust me, if your engine puts up 5 stars on the compression test and there`s no oil leak, you might get them to top off your oil between changes but there`s no way in hell they`re going to put an engine in it. It`s not them being uncooperative, it`s an unjustified solution. Of course keep monitoring it, and if it continues, or more importantly it gets worse, then you have grounds to bring it back up to the service department. Establish a relationship with the service manager. While no magic wand, they do have the means to personally influence authorizations from the manufacturer if there is evidence of a chronic problem with a specific vehicle, but those are very rare occasions and it`s unquestionably a case by case basis.

To recap, just stay on top of it, let them do their thing. If nothing comes of it, sit tight and ask them to revisit the diagnosis (retest it) in six months. If they`re bushwacking you and putting a bandaid on a bullet hole, it`ll expose itself later and you will have grounds to hold them to whatever action is ethically suitable (lol). If in fact your engine just happens to burn extra oil, express your concerns about reliability and press for a warranty extension.
 

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The "tough love" engine break in approach is complete nonsense in nearly every modern application. Sure, 50 years ago when automotive engine tolerances had such a wide variance from one cylinder to another, or in certain aviation engines, or in racing applications where the ring to cylinder wall gap is intentionally sized large, this theory holds water. For a modern automotive engine, especially one with high compression, all you're doing is causing excessive wear on the cylinder walls... plain and simple.

The number one most important rule in my opinion for any engine during break in is to let it warm up and cool properly. Wait at least 30 seconds for your engine to warm up some, or even better 60 seconds. Unless you're escaping from a chainsaw serial killer, let your engine warm up. The second rule is don't redline the engine for at least 500 miles. My friends dad spent $21,000 on a new Yamaha outboard to which i instructed him to do the break in properly and ALWAYS let the engine warm up and cool down, but what do I know. As soon as the boat was launched each time he'd turn it around and blast full throttle to plane less than a minute after start up (and in a no wake zone...) He ended up killing a freaking Japanese engineered and built modern fuel injected V-6 outboard at under 300 hours. Almost unheard of. I also advised to use ethanol free fuel and add a stabilizer, but he knows better than an engineer. $26,000 to be exact. $5,000 in repairs and it still runs like shit.

All in all, trust the engineers that designed your engine. If they say keep it under 3,000 RPM for the first 600 miles and avoid constant speeds on long trips, do it. Always remember, shade tree mechanics are mechanics and not engineers. They can rebuild all the b16s they want and drive them however they want, until they pass a P.E. exam showing that they truly understand the theories and principles behind heat cycles and the physics behind combustion chamber pressures, they can sit down, listen, and let the real engineers do the talking.
 

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Hey southern_3, not at all a poke on what you said, just some humor I was reminded of by it:

Fresh out of high school (25 years ago), I was pursuing a career in electronic engineering. As things go, I ended up doing more field work ("tech" work) and since I was working as a mechanic to pay for college, I got to see both sides of that coin. There was a saying that went around the tech circles: "Engineer; someone who knows how something should work. Tech (mechanic); someone who knows how something does work".

Of course I now have a comfortable, happy life and career that has nothing at all to do with turning wrenches nor designing circuits, and is pretty well the pinnacle of abstract, but it still makes me chuckle a bit.
 

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Indeed, the number one reason I decided to become an engineer was going to fix something on a car and thinking to myself what idiot designed this. Not putting engineers on a pedestal by any means, but I've met too many grease monkeys who think they know everything, and know better than engineers. I've even run into the best of both worlds, one of the kids I was in undergrad with couldn't figure out why his engine was overheating, so I began to ask him if he'd checked certain things. When I got to the thermostat, he got frustrated and replied "I'm a mechanic, you don't need to tell me what to do. I removed the thermostat anyway." Well, needless to say that engine was doomed as soon as he began "fixing" it. All in all I have a new respect for engineers, there's usually a reason as to why something was done that way, and it's usually beyond the knowledge of what a tech possesses...
 

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It sucks, but I seriously doubt a new motor or new car will be given for a half quart every 2100 miles. I think the current standard is 1 quart every thousand miles is considered acceptable.
That's a crazy amount of consumption for any car, lat alone a new one. I run 7500 mile intervals and my sGT burns about a quart over the duration. That's nowhere near what you're saying, but it's still way more than any other car I've owned, and I've owned a wide variety of vehicles. Maybe I'm overreacting, but I'm not comfortable with anything more than a 1/2 qt on a new car.
 
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