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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Really thinking about getting a possible wide body over fenders. I know I will have to either buy new wheels or add spacers to compensate and fill out the stance more. Where is the line between form and function and can it be done reasonably with a consideration as a daily driver? Here’s pictures for reference of kind of what I want.
 

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Don't do spacers unless you won't be driving the car hard(track or aggressive driving) and the spacers do not prohibit the lug nuts from threading on the same length as the width of the stud. So 12mm stock studs need to have the nut threaded on at least 12mm, any less than that and you lose clamping force to an unacceptable degree. More than 12mm doesn't hurt.

If you are going to really drive the car, you are best served going with proper offset. How much the offset effects things is more about fitment than performance. Performance of your wheels/tires is more dependent on weight, width, diameter, tire size, and tire properties. So you could have wheels that are 6.5" wide with an offset of -25 and 205/60r16 tires which would move the wheel outwards 75mm and make the car more stable side to side, but that would look ridiculous. So you would want to go to a wider rim and tire to make it look right. Going wider will effect fuel economy and steering negatively but will improve traction and stability. Going wider will also increase rotational mass, which will effect acceleration and braking negatively. You can get around the rotational mass issues with expensive rims and tires.

Most people with a car like ours will go with a 8-9" wide rim, going larger doesn't make much sense from a performance perspective because we don't really have the power to support it but your traction with 12" rims and properly fitting sport tires will be off the rails vs stock. A 18x9 0 offset rim with a 235/40r18 tire would be fine for a non-aggressively lowered car and would stick out 81.8mm more than stock with 16x6.5 rims, which is over 3", or a bit over an inch out from the stock fender.

You will have to have the body kit and suspension done before you select the rims and tires. You may find that even then you will need to change something to make it actually work and not cut or rub tires. Be aware that under those pretty fenders in your example pictures, there has been a lot of body work done to make it look that way. It isn't as easy as just bolting the fenders on. Prepare your wallet because a properly done widebody takes a lot of work and a considerable amount of money to make it look that good. You can easily spend more than the car is worth doing a widebody.

Don't forget that selling the car down the road will be much harder, it isn't a car like an NA miata or a BRZ that a large number of people would widebody anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Don't do spacers unless you won't be driving the car hard(track or aggressive driving) and the spacers do not prohibit the lug nuts from threading on the same length as the width of the stud. So 12mm stock studs need to have the nut threaded on at least 12mm, any less than that and you lose clamping force to an unacceptable degree. More than 12mm doesn't hurt.


If you are going to really drive the car, you are best served going with proper offset. How much the offset effects things is more about fitment than performance. Performance of your wheels/tires is more dependent on weight, width, diameter, tire size, and tire properties. So you could have wheels that are 6.5" wide with an offset of -25 and 205/60r16 tires which would move the wheel outwards 75mm and make the car more stable side to side, but that would look ridiculous. So you would want to go to a wider rim and tire to make it look right. Going wider will effect fuel economy and steering negatively but will improve traction and stability. Going wider will also increase rotational mass, which will effect acceleration and braking negatively. You can get around the rotational mass issues with expensive rims and tires.

Most people with a car like ours will go with a 8-9" wide rim, going larger doesn't make much sense from a performance perspective because we don't really have the power to support it but your traction with 12" rims and properly fitting sport tires will be off the rails vs stock. A 18x9 0 offset rim with a 235/40r18 tire would be fine for a non-aggressively lowered car and would stick out 81.8mm more than stock with 16x6.5 rims, which is over 3", or a bit over an inch out from the stock fender.

You will have to have the body kit and suspension done before you select the rims and tires. You may find that even then you will need to change something to make it actually work and not cut or rub tires. Be aware that under those pretty fenders in your example pictures, there has been a lot of body work done to make it look that way. It isn't as easy as just bolting the fenders on. Prepare your wallet because a properly done widebody takes a lot of work and a considerable amount of money to make it look that good. You can easily spend more than the car is worth doing a widebody.

Don't forget that selling the car down the road will be much harder, it isn't a car like an NA miata or a BRZ that a large number of people would widebody anyways.
Thanks for the insight and I do understand I’d prolly have to do a whole lot of work. So for the sake of argument I could possibly run this without ruining the ride? Air Suspension, Fender Work, Proper Offset wheels or spacers. I will keep in mind the whole suspension and fenders first. Then figure out the fitment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That car is pretty sick looking with the wide body dropped stance.

There's nothing like that in the US.. that's for sure..

Brett from CS has a wide body MS3. You should ask him about it.
CK
I know man it’s a bit shitty that everyone besides the US gets to enjoy sweet 3’s and we are over here salivating to try to even come close.
 

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Thanks for the insight and I do understand I’d prolly have to do a whole lot of work. So for the sake of argument I could possibly run this without ruining the ride? Air Suspension, Fender Work, Proper Offset wheels or spacers. I will keep in mind the whole suspension and fenders first. Then figure out the fitment.
The thing that will impact your ride quality the most will be your suspension. You are smart for going with air ride, that will help a lot... If you select the proper setup. An air ride can provide a fantastic ride quality, but making it handle how you want will require luck, skill, some trial and error, or all of those. Once you are on air, then you will have to test and evaluate your needs and change out more stuff like arms and sway bar/links to keep your suspension geometry where it should be so you wear tires evenly and don't need to flip tires or destroy tires constantly. Can you end up with a car that rides and handles better than stock? Yes! Will that be easy? No.

So your progression should be body work>suspension>wheels and tires>more suspension>possibly wheels and tires again.

What will be the hardest part is that you are blazing a trail. It isn't like a commonly slammed and widebodied car where you can see exactly what someone has done and do that same thing. You will have to go down a few well chosen paths to end up where you want to avoid spending more money than you need to get where you want. The chances of you getting it perfect the first go on any part of it is almost impossible given that you even have to ask about the topic, even professionals with many cars under their belt have difficulty and need to change stuff once they get to certain points with a different car. Take you time, plan it out, expect to make mistakes, and tough it out through the setbacks.
 

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If you are going widen the track of the car without changing the entire steering rack, you need to understand that it won't handle near as well as it did before. Read up on the effects of using wheels with extreme offset. Things like bump steer and scrub radius will be of particular interest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the insight and I do understand I’d prolly have to do a whole lot of work. So for the sake of argument I could possibly run this without ruining the ride? Air Suspension, Fender Work, Proper Offset wheels or spacers. I will keep in mind the whole suspension and fenders first. Then figure out the fitment.
The thing that will impact your ride quality the most will be your suspension. You are smart for going with air ride, that will help a lot... If you select the proper setup. An air ride can provide a fantastic ride quality, but making it handle how you want will require luck, skill, some trial and error, or all of those. Once you are on air, then you will have to test and evaluate your needs and change out more stuff like arms and sway bar/links to keep your suspension geometry where it should be so you wear tires evenly and don't need to flip tires or destroy tires constantly. Can you end up with a car that rides and handles better than stock? Yes! Will that be easy? No.

So your progression should be body work>suspension>wheels and tires>more suspension>possibly wheels and tires again.

What will be the hardest part is that you are blazing a trail. It isn't like a commonly slammed and widebodied car where you can see exactly what someone has done and do that same thing. You will have to go down a few well chosen paths to end up where you want to avoid spending more money than you need to get where you want. The chances of you getting it perfect the first go on any part of it is almost impossible given that you even have to ask about the topic, even professionals with many cars under their belt have difficulty and need to change stuff once they get to certain points with a different car. Take you time, plan it out, expect to make mistakes, and tough it out through the setbacks.
Sweet yeah I don’t expect it to go smoothly without some trial and error. I have almost a 5 year build plan, with Air Lift 3P/3H system/Wide Body as the final piece of the puzzle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you are going widen the track of the car without changing the entire steering rack, you need to understand that it won't handle near as well as it did before. Read up on the effects of using wheels with extreme offset. Things like bump steer and scrub radius will be of particular interest.
I get that it won’t handle near as well. I know that I’ll be throwing the whole suspension out of whack. Can you do a run down of what components I would need to look into replacing to get the form and function I’m looking for?
 
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