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That's because they moved the steering wheel and gauges over to the right side . Seems they were able to have. improved the intake stock cold air intake ducting on the left side so produced a more efficient engine with the higher compression of 14:1. Forgot to mention they have to run 97 1/2 octane also.
 

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Better fuel everywhere else around the world vs the US, we always get the detuned stuff.

Although I can guarantee that's a typo, because the 2.5 does make 175, and everywhere else they call that the "high power" model, but it is certainly not a 2.0L
 

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actually in Europe there are three types of engines: two petrol skyactiv- 1.5l /100hp, 2.0l/165hp(120hp electronically limited) and one diesel skyactive-2.2l/150hp.
 

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actually in Europe there are three types of engines: two petrol skyactiv- 1.5l /100hp, 2.0l/165hp(120hp electronically limited) and one diesel skyactive-2.2l/150hp.
Here in CZ it is slightly different: Petrol: 1.5L 74kW/100hp, 2.0L 88kW/120hp (the one that is electronically limited, but has also different transmission setting, it is the MPG oriented one), 2.0L 121kW/165hp.
For diesel there is only 2.2L 110kW/150hp.

Unfortunately, for sedan here you can have only the 2.0 120hp as the most powerful one. Seriously WTF? Why is the 165hp for hatch only? :censored 1: I wanted sedan, not hatch, so I had to take what is available, but maybe, if it is restricted only in ECU, then there is a way....
 

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I'm not complaining - 184hp at the front wheels is good enough for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, now i do recall something about the lower compression for the US market. Again, I'm sure it's related to the octane rating of the gas sold here. The car is pretty quick with 155hp, but it would be nice to have slightly more. I'm a fan of small, high revving, high power motors (a la honda vtec, toyota 2zz-ge).
 

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Then cheapest would probably trade her in for the 2.5 or that could have been purchased in the first place. Considerations in the NA market could be because of emissions could put it a different situation and not meet our standards. Not saying this could be it but just a thought.

The other one is that the quest for economy is in the 2.0L and those that want the extra power , buy the 2.5 and forget the economy. The other scenario is by retuning the ecu for more power then the mileage suffers and this is what the 2.0 is designed for and what Mazda is banking their sales on for those that want it.
 

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Mazda cut the cx-5 from 14:1 to 13:1 for us of a as well. lost 10 hp. The two diesel cs-5 are 150hp and 310 tq ad 175hp and like 375 tq. You can mess with the ECU and bump the 150 to 175 (+). When the twin turbo diesel comes stateside I plan on trading in.
If your planning on trading in for the diesel, you'll love it.

A couple of points.

As I'm sure many know, it's not 'as easy' to tune a diesel (or is it?) but the '14's 2.2 diesel lump is exactly the same as the 2nd gen's. And here in the UK the 2nd gen diesel was a 185ps.

Therefore, if you don't care much about economy, you should be able to get that same 185ps from the'14.

With a remap on the diesel 2.2, it's 'claimed' that you can get +40ps going upto 225ps on the 2nd gen, so this may also be possible on the '14.

The '14 2.2 also had an elongated 4,2,1 exhaust manifold, so slightly cooler air goes into the turbo's, yes, there are two, and they are sequential, and they are awesome!
 

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Ok all this would be great in NA when and if it happens but the usual problem with diesels is "clean running" and not just when they are new but for X number of years down the road.Plus higher running maintenance costs. With the newer diesels ; most if not all are electronically controlled so yes , it would not be hard to bump up the power. just like they do with the trucks over here.
 

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Ok all this would be great in NA when and if it happens but the usual problem with diesels is "clean running" and not just when they are new but for X number of years down the road.Plus higher running maintenance costs. With the newer diesels ; most if not all are electronically controlled so yes , it would not be hard to bump up the power. just like they do with the trucks over here.
The euro 2.2 run's at 107g /km or euro VI emissions category, afaik without any addictives. It's basically as efficient as a 1.6TDI from pretty much any given other manufacturer. If that isn't impressive, I don't know what is.
 

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I agree diesels are good if the extra cost of maintaining is ok but would only go diesel if I was towing because of he towing benefits, the sky active gas is getting to the efficiency of diesel, not the same but you have to look at the big cost picture of running one vs the other.
 

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I can't speak for extra cost as of yet, but in all honesty, it appears mazda have put some real thought into the mapping the 2.2 not only more efficient, but better at getting it's power down. All in all, imo, it's one impressive engine, and I'm proud to own one.

We also have a service plan with the dealer, so the general stuff is covered for the next 3 years, plus we don't have to worry about MOT's for the first three years either. (roadworthy testing) so all in, servicing is minimal until 2017, then we'll find out more about costs.
 

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I'd love a diesel Mazda3 in North America but they cost more on what is already a more-expensive vehicle in the compact segment on this side of the pond. It would cost roughly the same as the 2.5l petrol or slightly more, and combined with the fact that diesel runs about 5-6 cents more per litre than regular petrol, it would sell in very low numbers.

As for the 2.0 litre power differences, it mainly has to do with fuel octane requirements and potentially the higher sulphur fuel. Most western European countries have petrol of 95 RON (about 91 AKI in the US/Canada) and just 10ppm of sulphur. Australia is most similar to the US since they also have the same petrol engines as the US (albeit with a 6MT avail in the 2.5l) and a higher sulphur content in their fuel of 50ppm.

Diesel fuel differences may also play a factor with the diesel motor. The minimum cetane number in the EU and Australia is 51, where as it is just 40 in the US. Having driven a BMW X5 35d in the past, this makes a notable difference in driving characteristics (there are some stations that sell 45-47 cetane diesel). Of course, the US has those pesky CARB states with their own version of emissions restrictions.....
 

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I'd love a diesel Mazda3 in North America but they cost more on what is already a more-expensive vehicle in the compact segment on this side of the pond. It would cost roughly the same as the 2.5l petrol or slightly more, and combined with the fact that diesel runs about 5-6 cents more per litre than regular petrol, it would sell in very low numbers.

As for the 2.0 litre power differences, it mainly has to do with fuel octane requirements and potentially the higher sulphur fuel. Most western European countries have petrol of 95 RON (about 91 AKI in the US/Canada) and just 10ppm of sulphur. Australia is most similar to the US since they also have the same petrol engines as the US (albeit with a 6MT avail in the 2.5l) and a higher sulphur content in their fuel of 50ppm.

Diesel fuel differences may also play a factor with the diesel motor. The minimum cetane number in the EU and Australia is 51, where as it is just 40 in the US. Having driven a BMW X5 35d in the past, this makes a notable difference in driving characteristics (there are some stations that sell 45-47 cetane diesel). Of course, the US has those pesky CARB states with their own version of emissions restrictions.....
On the mention of the pesky CARB states - the leader of which, California, mandates a minimum of 53 cetane for diesel. If anything, CARB states are the ones helping diesel in the US.
 

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On the mention of the pesky CARB states - the leader of which, California, mandates a minimum of 53 cetane for diesel. If anything, CARB states are the ones helping diesel in the US.
It's not helping if the diesels can't be sold because it won't meet the emissions standards in the first place for legal sale.

That said, the Euro-6 emissions standards coming into force are forcing all automakers to be more careful about diesel NOx emissions so it won't be as hard or costly for them to sell in North America in the coming years.
 
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