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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a used pair of these off the forums here. Install wasn't too bad. I adjusted 3/4 struts to the stiffest setting, however the last one seems to be rusted tight and not adjustable at all. Because of this it seems that I'm getting a lot of travel on bumpy roads causing me to rub that one side more even with a 1.5 inch gap between the tire and fender. I know the easy solution would be to just raise it up more, but how else would I go about breaking it loose to adjust it to full stiff?

Also should I do something regarding adjusting the height from the spring?
 

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I purchased a used pair of these off the forums here. Install wasn't too bad. I adjusted 3/4 struts to the stiffest setting, however the last one seems to be rusted tight and not adjustable at all. Because of this it seems that I'm getting a lot of travel on bumpy roads causing me to rub that one side more even with a 1.5 inch gap between the tire and fender. I know the easy solution would be to just raise it up more, but how else would I go about breaking it loose to adjust it to full stiff?

Also should I do something regarding adjusting the height from the spring?
Well that sucks. Seems to be a common thing with coilovers; not performing the extra maintenance that comes along with them. This is why you often see coilovers for sale with disclaimers like cannot be adjusted for height, the dampening is stuck, etc. It's also why I shake my head when people suggest coilovers offhandedly when people make "what mods should I get" type posts. The threads, particualry near the locking nuts have to be kept relatively clean and definitely have to be lubed; not only on the outside, but all the bearings/pillow balls (if equipped) on the inside. I digress.

I'm assuming you are talking about adjusting the dampening vs the soft/hard knob? Have you tried taking the knob off? It's usually just a threaded cap basically with an allen key inside. For my BC's it's a 19mm nut/cap (as well as a 19mm nut holding it all together... If you can get it off you can try putting some PB or liquid wrench in there, and then placing an appropriately sized allen inside to try to free it. Here is a generic picture of a D2 coilover I googled. Notice below the cap itself is a nut; that purple nut should be the for the adjuster cap. It's literally just a knob with an allen key attached to it. The silver nut below it is what actually holds the assembly together. If you can't manage to break it loose, and it's actually damaged inside, the only option is a rebuild or replacement.

Note: I notice that picture has some type of scale on the knob. Not that it matters as far as adjustment is concerned but you might place a mark if you do remove the nut.

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Well that sucks. Seems to be a common thing with coilovers; not performing the extra maintenance that comes along with them. This is why you often see coilovers for sale with disclaimers like cannot be adjusted for height, the dampening is stuck, etc. It's also why I shake my head when people suggest coilovers offhandedly when people make "what mods should I get" type posts. The threads, particualry near the locking nuts have to be kept relatively clean and definitely have to be lubed; not only on the outside, but all the bearings/pillow balls (if equipped) on the inside. I digress.

I'm assuming you are talking about adjusting the dampening vs the soft/hard knob? Have you tried taking the knob off? It's usually just a threaded cap basically with an allen key inside. For my BC's it's a 19mm nut/cap (as well as a 19mm nut holding it all together... If you can get it off you can try putting some PB or liquid wrench in there, and then placing an appropriately sized allen inside to try to free it. Here is a generic picture of a D2 coilover I googled. Notice below the cap itself is a nut; that purple nut should be the for the adjuster cap. It's literally just a knob with an allen key attached to it. The silver nut below it is what actually holds the assembly together. If you can't manage to break it loose, and it's actually damaged inside, the only option is a rebuild or replacement.

Note: I notice that picture has some type of scale on the knob. Not that it matters as far as adjustment is concerned but you might place a mark if you do remove the nut.

It's adjusted by inserting this allen key with the cap as pictured below. I have been able to remove and insert this key for all 4 struts/shocks. For the front 2 struts and one rear shock, I can insert this key in and turn it clockwise with minimal to moderate effort. However for the last rear shock, it is clearly stuck from rust. I tried multiple methods to rotate the cap without any success. I applied PB blaster, WD-40 and multiple lubricants/thread breakers without any resolve.

I guess the biggest thing I'm asking then is how do I reduce the shock travel then to prevent rubbing? Would I need higher spring rates? I've been searching for the spring rates for this set and have heard various numbers without consistency.

http://en.d2racingsport.eu/media/ca...8d6e5fb8d27136e95/d/2/d2-adjustment-rod_1.jpg
 

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Really the only thing is to take an allen key the same size of the adjuster, stick it in place of the adjuster and in conjunction with a lube, try to break loose the damper. If it is actually broken, then you can't do anything about the rate on the shock and it's pretty much going to be off all the time. To find out your spring rate you need to know the model number of your coils, and assuming they original owner hasn't changed anything, the manufacturer can give you the spring rates. That is exactly what I did with my BC's to figure out the OEM spring rate in case I want to get a different rate spring. That may work but it may produce undesirable handling characteristics. If you are considering buying a new spring you mmay inquire what the cost of a repair is..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Really the only thing is to take an allen key the same size of the adjuster, stick it in place of the adjuster and in conjunction with a lube, try to break loose the damper. If it is actually broken, then you can't do anything about the rate on the shock and it's pretty much going to be off all the time. To find out your spring rate you need to know the model number of your coils, and assuming they original owner hasn't changed anything, the manufacturer can give you the spring rates. That is exactly what I did with my BC's to figure out the OEM spring rate in case I want to get a different rate spring. That may work but it may produce undesirable handling characteristics. If you are considering buying a new spring you mmay inquire what the cost of a repair is..
I contacted their customer support and they told me I should try PB blaster and using a t-style allen key to break it loose. I'm currently inquiring about the spring rates. At this point everything seems ok besides the travel causing the rub. I feel like I have plenty adequate space but I'm rubbing bad on just moderate bumps and the area I live in has constant construction on the roads. Makes me question whether I should have just purchased a new set of Megan's or even saved for BC's.
 
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