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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

Recently I bought a CS SRI from a member from here, thanks Matt :)



After fitting it I started with monitoring IAT temps. Soon confirmed my expectation that a cold air box is need, as temps goes quickly up when sitting in traffic and fans kick in.
CS cold air box is really nice, however getting one in Bulgaria, Europe would cost me more than $200.... for just a plastic box I won't pay that much.

So started with examining the stock air box. First thing to do was to remove the lower resonator and tapping the hole.





I decided to use the lower half of the stock air box with the snorkel mainly because it was fitting nice and the air filter comes in the center of the box. For the other half of the box I decided to fabricate custom part.
It was time to find a suitable box which will fit in the lower half. Found an $1 1 gallon IKEA box that fits perfectly with some trimming on the edges :)





The idea is to make a mold from this IKEA box and make a carbon fiber casting from the mold :wink2:
Started with trimming the edges and filling the necessary spaces with modelling clay and bumper kit on top.
Glued two pins on the back side to fit in the factory holes of the lower half.







Then started with filling the contacting edge of the box with bumper kit.



After some sanding and filling it started to take shape :)





That's it for now, will keep you posted how things are going.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
When examining the stock air inlet system, I didn't liked how the snorkel takes air from the area where the hood lock is. From the front grill it takes a long path to the snorkel. After taking out the top radiator cover I found a path just below the cover, which has direct access to the front grill.



However, there is one small problem... there is a horn in the way! So what we are going to do? Relocate the horn! :grin2:
On the left side under the radiator cover there is same mounting spot with a grounding cable attached to the bolt. Excellent!



Removed all clips and bolts on top of the bumper and was able easily to move the horn to the left side. You don't have to remove the front bumper to do this, there is enough space to move the horn without taking it out of the car.
The horn takes power from just 1 cable and is using the mount as ground. The horn is using universal clip type connector (don't know how is called in english, but you can see it on the pic), I just had to make an extension cable.



Don't forget to mount the grounding cable together with the horn on the new location. Here is a pic of the horn mounted and extension cable connected.



What is left to do is to cut an opening in the radiator cover and the direct air inlet will be ready. On the pic below you can see where the cut has to be.



There is also a possibility to add a ramp from the front grill to the opening to direct cold air. The original mounting spot for the horn remains free, so can be used for mounting the ramp.
 

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this will make absolutely bugger all difference to performance

it's nothing more than a warm air intake, which i believe, misses the whole point of it

if you want CAI, have the intake in the wheel well....or anywhere else, so long as it's away from the engine, which yours isn't
 

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Discussion Starter #6
this will make absolutely bugger all difference to performance

it's nothing more than a warm air intake, which i believe, misses the whole point of it

if you want CAI, have the intake in the wheel well....or anywhere else, so long as it's away from the engine, which yours isn't
You are saying that stock air inlet system is a warm intake, OK :)
When the box is ready, I will monitor IAT temperatures and if I'm satisfied with the temps will leave it this way, if not may feed air from different location.
 

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*The Electrician*
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this will make absolutely bugger all difference to performance

it's nothing more than a warm air intake, which i believe, misses the whole point of it

if you want CAI, have the intake in the wheel well....or anywhere else, so long as it's away from the engine, which yours isn't
FYI the oem intake does a pretty damn good job, after heat soaking for an hour with IAT at 80C(176F) within less than 5 minutes of driving the IAT had dropped to within 5 degrees of ambient. Id say thats pretty damn good for a stock oem intake, wouldn't you?
 
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FYI the oem intake does a pretty damn good job, after heat soaking for an hour with IAT at 80C(176F) within less than 5 minutes of driving the IAT had dropped to within 5 degrees of ambient. Id say thats pretty damn good for a stock oem intake, wouldn't you?
I agree. I have always had modified intakes on all my previous vehicles and I'm glad I did my research before purchasing anything for my 17' 2.0. I did purchase a bluetooth obd/can reader to monitor IATs and the stock intake does a wonderful job. The only modification I am tempted to try would be to line the stock box with a heat barrier insulation which may help with that in-limbo 5 minute period jumping from red light to red light. It still feels odd to accept that a stock intake performs better than most aftermarket setups after years of dealing with the opposite scenario. Heatsoak is real!:grin2:
 

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*The Electrician*
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I agree. I have always had modified intakes on all my previous vehicles and I'm glad I did my research before purchasing anything for my 17' 2.0. I did purchase a bluetooth obd/can reader to monitor IATs and the stock intake does a wonderful job. The only modification I am tempted to try would be to line the stock box with a heat barrier insulation which may help with that in-limbo 5 minute period jumping from red light to red light. It still feels odd to accept that a stock intake performs better than most aftermarket setups after years of dealing with the opposite scenario. Heatsoak is real!:grin2:
Honestly the only downside to the oem intake is the sound dampening, I love SRI intake scream. Ive seen people take a grinder to the inside of oem airboxes before to eliminate all the fins(baffles) which is part of what eliminates intake noise. I haven't seen anyone do that on a 2014+ Mazda 3 yet so I am hesitant to try it, but still very tempting. I poked open that drain hole at the bottom a tiny bit more using a 3/8th drill bit as another M3R member had done, the noise gain is very minimal. Im fairly convinced on leaving my intake stock. There just isn't enough gains to justify $400 for what should be a $200(including shipping) SRI just to heat soak and lose power.
 
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Honestly the only downside to the oem intake is the sound dampening, I love SRI intake scream. Ive seen people take a grinder to the inside of oem airboxes before to eliminate all the fins(baffles) which is part of what eliminates intake noise. I haven't seen anyone do that on a 2014+ Mazda 3 yet so I am hesitant to try it, but still very tempting. I poked open that drain hole at the bottom a tiny bit more using a 3/8th drill bit as another M3R member had done, the noise gain is very minimal. Im fairly convinced on leaving my intake stock. There just isn't enough gains to justify $400 for what should be a $200(including shipping) SRI just to heat soak and lose power.
I remember reading about your drill bit experiment a few days ago while I was doing my homework on intakes. In my younger years I loved to hear my cars and motorcycles but anymore, I really like to lay low and not attract attention to myself. Heads turning is a great compliment but when it's the head of police officer... that is a different story.

I still believe I will keep the OEM intake system. I ordered an OV tune and I'm very interested to see what they can pull out of my vehicle with all stock components vs those who have modified intake and exhaust systems on the skyactivs.

A few other slight modifications I may make to the stock system would be removing the carbon filter from the airbox, drop in AEM for higher flow rate, and possibly removing the upper radiator trim plate to allow ambient air to flow more direct into the stock airbox scoop

I found an interesting read if anyone is looking for some information on data logging for small modification:
MAF vs Differential Pressure for Intake Testing | Tuner University
 

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A few other slight modifications I may make to the stock system would be removing the carbon filter from the airbox, drop in AEM for higher flow rate, and possibly removing the upper radiator trim plate to allow ambient air to flow more direct into the stock airbox scoop

I found an interesting read if anyone is looking for some information on data logging for small modification:
MAF vs Differential Pressure for Intake Testing | Tuner University
Removing the carbon filter isn't going to help.
The AEM filter may flow more than the OEM filter in theory but the factory filter flows more than the engine can draw anyhow so there isn't really anything to be gained there. This and more flow from the same size filter usually means that the filtering medium has larger pores, so more crap gets through into the motor.
Using pressure differential meters is fine in theory, but again, the engine will only draw so much air at any given time. If it is already pulling in as much as it can, there is really no reason to open up the intake upstream of the throttle plate. I think you will find that this is the case with the Mazda SkyActiv motors.
 

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Removing the carbon filter isn't going to help.
The AEM filter may flow more than the OEM filter in theory but the factory filter flows more than the engine can draw anyhow so there isn't really anything to be gained there. This and more flow from the same size filter usually means that the filtering medium has larger pores, so more crap gets through into the motor.
Using pressure differential meters is fine in theory, but again, the engine will only draw so much air at any given time. If it is already pulling in as much as it can, there is really no reason to open up the intake upstream of the throttle plate. I think you will find that this is the case with the Mazda SkyActiv motors.
I know there is debate on the carbon filters all over the net. I came from the tacoma/4runner forums where there was always a butt-dyno battle over the effects. I believe there is nothing to be gained nor lost by keeping or removing it based on my past experience with removing them but if it won't hurt, then why not.

I have followed and read the majority of your threads on intakes as well and your information has been thorough and resourceful. I do have a question for you, how do we know that the factory filter flows sufficiently enough for our motors? Is this based simply off driveability(if the motor required more air it would hiccup and struggle upon demand)? Also, as far as making more power is concerned, it has shown that the factory filter and airbox are the most powerful and most consistent but I also know that where in the powerband that power is delivered with stock system vs aftermarket has been discussed. Others have also documented 'feeling' better throttle response in the low to mid range with high-flow drop in filters. My speed demon days are behind me and I don't wish to play around at above highway speeds but our little motors could certainly benefit from some lower range throttle response and torque for daily driving around town. Any input is appreciated
 

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I know there is debate on the carbon filters all over the net. I came from the tacoma/4runner forums where there was always a butt-dyno battle over the effects. I believe there is nothing to be gained nor lost by keeping or removing it based on my past experience with removing them but if it won't hurt, then why not.

I have followed and read the majority of your threads on intakes as well and your information has been thorough and resourceful. I do have a question for you, how do we know that the factory filter flows sufficiently enough for our motors? Is this based simply off driveability(if the motor required more air it would hiccup and struggle upon demand)? Also, as far as making more power is concerned, it has shown that the factory filter and airbox are the most powerful and most consistent but I also know that where in the powerband that power is delivered with stock system vs aftermarket has been discussed. Others have also documented 'feeling' better throttle response in the low to mid range with high-flow drop in filters. My speed demon days are behind me and I don't wish to play around at above highway speeds but our little motors could certainly benefit from some lower range throttle response and torque for daily driving around town. Any input is appreciated
Butt dyno vs real dyno, guess which one is better?
Filters have been tested, there is no real benefit to high flow filters in these cars. I have tested a few things, from OEM to basically an open ended SRI, there was not any real difference.
Throttle response is controlled by the ECU. As such the only real way to improve it is through the tune process, and yes it can be a lot better when done right.
You might get a bit more out of it by keep IAT numbers way down, but short of forced induction you won't get a significant gain in airflow or anything else related by changing filters, intakes etc.
 

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Butt dyno vs real dyno, guess which one is better?
Filters have been tested, there is no real benefit to high flow filters in these cars. I have tested a few things, from OEM to basically an open ended SRI, there was not any real difference.
Throttle response is controlled by the ECU. As such the only real way to improve it is through the tune process, and yes it can be a lot better when done right.
You might get a bit more out of it by keep IAT numbers way down, but short of forced induction you won't get a significant gain in airflow or anything else related by changing filters, intakes etc.
I'm on your side, brother. Believe me I have done my homework. I think I've read word-for-word every thread on the topic. I'm not a skimmer like the rest of these guys jumping to the last active page and then asking questions because they didn't want to spend the time reading or searching.
I'm very curious where CS got their dyno-proven HP numbers from if there is no true benefit to adding a larger and/or more free-flowing filter. I also recall VoodooJeff claiming a true 7hp from his CS intake. Obviously his numbers were pulled from a dyno while the car was sitting in a garage with ideal ambient airflow via a fan etc. So I'm assuming that the real world drive-ability and numerous outside variables contribute to no true, useable hp gain
 

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I'm on your side, brother. Believe me I have done my homework. I think I've read word-for-word every thread on the topic. I'm not a skimmer like the rest of these guys jumping to the last active page and then asking questions because they didn't want to spend the time reading or searching.
I'm very curious where CS got their dyno-proven HP numbers from if there is no true benefit to adding a larger and/or more free-flowing filter. I also recall VoodooJeff claiming a true 7hp from his CS intake. Obviously his numbers were pulled from a dyno while the car was sitting in a garage with ideal ambient airflow via a fan etc. So I'm assuming that the real world drive-ability and numerous outside variables contribute to no true, useable hp gain
Dyno numbers can be tricky. Yes, you can get a few hp out of an SRI. Put it on the dyno, open the hood and turn on the fans.
First couple times you'll see an improvement, but once things start to heat up the numbers go the other way. This was tested and documented by Emilio at 949Racing on another forum. Real world, as long as you are moving at a decent speed IATs are pretty good, close to what you would see with the OEM box. Get into some traffic lights etc and temps spike bad, well over 130°F pretty fast.
Another thing to consider is that in the tests that showed small gains, those gains were for the most part pretty high in the rpm range, outside of where most people are comfortable driving. Its not like you would get anything useful in the lower or midrange where most driving is done.
 

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*The Electrician*
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On a side note it is incredible the difference 15C ambient makes with this car. It has been high 20's low 30's(Celsius) the past few weeks and driving during the day the car feels somewhat sluggish. Going out at night once the temperature has dropped to 15C the same roads same driving, just incredible. Spring and Fall is where this car will shine brightest. I wish I could get the IAT below ambient, that would be bosssssss :nerd:
 
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On a side note it is incredible the difference 15C ambient makes with this car. It has been high 20's low 30's(Celsius) the past few weeks and driving during the day the car feels somewhat sluggish. Going out at night once the temperature has dropped to 15C the same roads same driving, just incredible. Spring and Fall is where this car will shine brightest. I wish I could get the IAT below ambient, that would be bosssssss :nerd:
Well, you could do what Dodge does with the Demon and pipe the A/C into the intake box....:smile2:
 
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