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I see many gen 1 & 2 & 3 with rust around rear wheels and 3rd brake light. Now that what is visible . I doubt they had the car sprayed with some sort of rust retard / inhibitor. I knew i was going to keep this car (2012) well past 10years and was going to mod it ... After 3 - 4 years (applied product evevry year) i would find out ..did it work , is there rust , did the car stay clean underneath ( i should video it next time she is up on the lift) and I do not have any rust visible. If you intend on keeping the car a long time then do it !
It will keep all under parts from premature deterioration ...
Cheers!
JoeMini, did you attempt to spray the product into the (possibly) boxed-in joint between inner and outer rear fenders? What I mean, here, is the inner fender, AKA "wheelhouse" joins the quarter panel in a lap-seam that is the "wheel lip". Gen 2 was the first time that Mazda ran body seam sealer as a proper and machine-applied regular bead all the way along that lip, BTW.... Gen 1's were a disaster in that regard. In any case, rust often occurs from the inside of that boxed-in area... and I think it starts as condensation. Mazda's are notably poor with galvanizing according to some, and I am not sure whether the quarter panel is two-sided-galvanized. In any case my idea is to drill a number of 3/4" holes "along" the wheel lip, some distance away from the lip (obviously) in the rear wheelhouse. These would be plugged, subsequently, with "flushplugs" when all is done. Said holes would be made with a "coupon-retaining" 3/4" holesaw, with an adjustable-depth pilot drill. You would set the pilot drill 'real shallow so that you do not potentially damage the inner surface of the quarter panel....you don't want to touch that inner surface or b*gger it up.

Then, you would use something like the Bilt Hamber Dynax S-50 product to thoroughly coat the inside of that boxed cavity, concentrating on the seam between inner wheelhouse and quarter panel. Then, on with the flushplugs.

I was wondering, whether the "dog-leg" actually has a drain hole, immediately forward of the rear wheel? You would absolutely NOT want to plug that with this interior cavity rustproofing chemical.

Do Y'All agree with this plan? Has anyone done this?
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
As you are in the UK, you really, really ought to check the reputation of Bilt Hamber's products (origin of which is England). The S-50 interior cavity protector, the UB (brown under-body spray), and the UC (clear under-body spray). I am really going to try to get the S-50 and the UB into Canada. Might have to import them from Australia... They are not available in North America. If you check out the discussion about that product, you would see a lot of praise on its abilities... 'way more than Waxoyl or Dinitrol, both of which are common enough in Europe.
I chose XCF based on various reports like this one
I also had a reply from Honest John which is a well known UK car ownership web site:

It would appear that your situation is not dissimilar to other Mazda owners in that the paint around the suspension etc is not of a good quality as you would find on other cars ( I would have thought that the dealership would have been aware of this). You may want to try something like Hammerite Kurust followed by Waxoyl as a treatment. As for keeping the car in the garage we would continue to keep it in the garage.

Comments?
 

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JoeMini, did you attempt to spray the product into the (possibly) boxed-in joint between inner and outer rear fenders? What I mean, here, is the inner fender, AKA "wheelhouse" joins the quarter panel in a lap-seam that is the "wheel lip". Gen 2 was the first time that Mazda ran body seam sealer as a proper and machine-applied regular bead all the way along that lip, BTW.... Gen 1's were a disaster in that regard. In any case, rust often occurs from the inside of that boxed-in area... and I think it starts as condensation. Mazda's are notably poor with galvanizing according to some, and I am not sure whether the quarter panel is two-sided-galvanized. In any case my idea is to drill a number of 3/4" holes "along" the wheel lip, some distance away from the lip (obviously) in the rear wheelhouse. These would be plugged, subsequently, with "flushplugs" when all is done. Said holes would be made with a "coupon-retaining" 3/4" holesaw, with an adjustable-depth pilot drill. You would set the pilot drill 'real shallow so that you do not potentially damage the inner surface of the quarter panel....you don't want to touch that inner surface or b*gger it up.

Then, you would use something like the Bilt Hamber Dynax S-50 product to thoroughly coat the inside of that boxed cavity, concentrating on the seam between inner wheelhouse and quarter panel. Then, on with the flushplugs.

I was wondering, whether the "dog-leg" actually has a drain hole, immediately forward of the rear wheel? You would absolutely NOT want to plug that with this interior cavity rustproofing chemical.

Do Y'All agree with this plan? Has anyone done this?
JoeMini, did you attempt to spray the product into the (possibly) boxed-in joint between inner and outer rear fenders? What I mean, here, is the inner fender, AKA "wheelhouse" joins the quarter panel in a lap-seam that is the "wheel lip". Gen 2 was the first time that Mazda ran body seam sealer as a proper and machine-applied regular bead all the way along that lip, BTW.... Gen 1's were a disaster in that regard. In any case, rust often occurs from the inside of that boxed-in area... and I think it starts as condensation. Mazda's are notably poor with galvanizing according to some, and I am not sure whether the quarter panel is two-sided-galvanized. In any case my idea is to drill a number of 3/4" holes "along" the wheel lip, some distance away from the lip (obviously) in the rear wheelhouse. These would be plugged, subsequently, with "flushplugs" when all is done. Said holes would be made with a "coupon-retaining" 3/4" holesaw, with an adjustable-depth pilot drill. You would set the pilot drill 'real shallow so that you do not potentially damage the inner surface of the quarter panel....you don't want to touch that inner surface or b*gger it up.

Then, you would use something like the Bilt Hamber Dynax S-50 product to thoroughly coat the inside of that boxed cavity, concentrating on the seam between inner wheelhouse and quarter panel. Then, on with the flushplugs.

I was wondering, whether the "dog-leg" actually has a drain hole, immediately forward of the rear wheel? You would absolutely NOT want to plug that with this interior cavity rustproofing chemical.

Do Y'All agree with this plan? Has anyone done this?
Hey Thanks for that info !!
I dont spray twice a year (whole car & 2nd time underside only)
I do have Krown do a pre salt neutralizer spray (Mostly always free to returning clients) to blow out any hidden debris.
I do ask Krown to paid special attention the rear wheel areas (They usually flood it with product)
I do get an extra can of product (usually free to returning clients) and spray any metal nuts bolts connections i can to a couple of times a year
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Here are some photos - what do you think? The issue has now been referred to Mazda Technical Dept under warranty.
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I don't know any manufacturer that will warranty that. They will state corrosion warranty only covers perforation.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I'm now confused. The Mazda technicians today said such corrosion is unusual in their experience on a 3 year old Mazda whereas folks here rate the corrosion as as typical.
 

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I'm now confused. The Mazda technicians today said such corrosion is unusual in their experience on a 3 year old Mazda whereas folks here rate the corrosion as as typical.
Yeah, its pretty typical of what you would see here in the US on most any 3 year old car, some are worse than that. Not sure why the tech says it unusual. Anything made of steel will rust when exposed to moisture, and unless you keep it all covered with some sort of corrosion inhibitor it is going to rust unless you live in a very dry environment, especially after 3 years or so. Whats in the picture is only a bit of surface rust, its hardly a problem.
 

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My car has never been north of Jacksonville and I have a few bits and pieces that are starting to show some surface rust. It happens. Northern cars get it far worse.
 

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Another case of Mazda building to a budget: they should have phosphated it as pre-treatment, then e-coated as primer, then topcoated it. Instead, just barely primed/topcoated. Mfrs used to do the former... and more expensive cars still do.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Another case of Mazda building to a budget: they should have phosphated it as pre-treatment, then e-coated as primer, then topcoated it. Instead, just barely primed/topcoated. Mfrs used to do the former... and more expensive cars still do.
Which manufacturers treat suspension components in the way you mention?
 

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Which manufacturers treat suspension components in the way you mention?
Some mfrs who have been bitten (e.g. Toyota with their Dana Corp. supplied frame for their Tacoma) had a severe frame / susp. rust issue that cost them mega $. They subsequently much-improved matters, possibly with wax-based rustproofing or with the treatment I mentioned above. I'm not sure which. The more premium mfrs like Benz, BMW, Audi typically use aluminum suspension cpts or cast steel ones... and in some cases cast ductile iron - as opposed to the more poor-boy mfrs like Mazda which use pressed steel and welded-together pressed steel. The former (particularly aluminum + cast ductile iron) do not have corr. issues.

All premium brands tend to not have virulent, pervasive corrosion issues. Mazda, more corr. due to inadequate pre-treatment, primer, topcoat (+ inferior type of mtl to start with).

I don't follow the industry well enough to know all mfrs' processes but I do know phosphating, e-coating, topcoat paint still is used to this day, albeit at greater production cost. It was widespread practise. This goes 'round with higher base-cost vehicle. Sometimes you get what you pay for...
 

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The former (particularly aluminum + cast ductile iron) do not have corr. issues.
I find it amusing the way people keep saying that aluminum does not corrode. It doesn't rust as its not a ferrous based metal but it does indeed corrode. Some of the more common road de-icing agents eat aluminum for breakfast. If you don't wash thoroughly and use a chloride neutralizer, aluminum will oxidize and corrode. Suspension parts that are hard to clean and aluminum wheels are particularly susceptible.
 

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Cast iron corrodes too... but typical cast nodular iron essentially develops a relatively stable oxide and section sizes typically are bigger so it is not problematic. That mtl and aluminum forgings are far removed from what Mazda-fabricated subframes do, vis à vis corrosion: they corrode-away in flakes to nothing...
 

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RE: effectiveness of WD40
There's something more to it sure it washes off easily with some water pressure. Coming from Toyota trucks, there are a select few that spray WD40 before winter and never get it washed DURING winter until spring. The layer of grime seems to act as a sacrificial layer.

Their results speak for themselves, link below.

Personally, I use Fluid Film and hit the few visible bolts during tire changeover.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
What did Mazda say?
Mazda UK said - this looks like a normal level of corrosion - The vehicle will have been affected by road salt etc over the last three years. The suspension components look like they have light surface corrosion only, so the component safety would not be affected. On this basis, Mazda UK would not be looking at replacing any parts under a warranty guidelines.

Are there cars in the Mazda 3 price range which have better corrosion prevention of the suspension components?
 

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Seems to me there are... here in North America. Many of our Domestics have got that down pat. I'm not sure any of us here could say that the Japanese cars are a "go-to" for corrosion-protectedness. Best example of a cheap, well-protected car is the cheapest baseline VW... say a base Jetta. Having said this -German cars (well, particularly VW) scare me... re longterm prospects.
 
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