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My local dealer has just done the 3 year service on my Mazda 3 bought new in 2017. They commented on corrosion on many of the black painted suspension components and linkages. There is rust breaking through the black paint on many of the suspension components front and back after 3 years / 18000 miles. I don't believe my Mazda looks much worse than other cars I've owned from new after 3 years. The car is kept in the damp UK climate in Southern England but we don't get much road salt.

What do other owner's suspension components look like after 3 years? Are they relatively pristine or showing corrosion like mine?
 

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Well first thing is that no car manufacturer will cover suspension parts or the underside of the car for a warranty item. I tried :(

Yes these cars do seem to get some light corrosion on some suspension parts - the A-arms in particular. This is nothing to be concerned with unless it's rotted through or going that way.

Want to slow it down? Spray it with some of the rubberized paint.
 

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Well first thing is that no car manufacturer will cover suspension parts or the underside of the car for a warranty item. I tried :(

Yes these cars do seem to get some light corrosion on some suspension parts - the A-arms in particular. This is nothing to be concerned with unless it's rotted through or going that way.

Want to slow it down? Spray it with some of the rubberized paint.
Thanks. I've sprayed the areas with WD40 for now. I'm not too bothered since I'll change the car this year. Perhaps keeping the car in my garage isn't a good idea especially when the under body is wet.
 

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Thanks. I've sprayed the areas with WD40 for now. I'm not too bothered since I'll change the car this year. Perhaps keeping the car in my garage isn't a good idea especially when the under body is wet.
The garage isn't a problem provided that it's not heated in any way. Salt and moisture doesn't do a lot to steel until the temperature gets to around freezing point or above. I keep my car in a detached garage myself. It's actually a good thing since it's not sitting outside exposed to the elements.

WD-40 is not a good choice for rust prevention. It'll do a lot of nothing. WD-40 is actually a solvent and a penetrating lubricant. It's not something that will stick to the metal. A good choice (having done this in the past) is to smear a coat of regular multi purpose grease on it until you can address it proper .
 

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WD-40 is not a good choice for rust prevention. It'll do a lot of nothing. WD-40 is actually a solvent and a penetrating lubricant. It's not something that will stick to the metal. A good choice (having done this in the past) is to smear a coat of regular multi purpose grease on it until you can address it proper .
Not a good choice? Wasn't that its original purpose? Its contains a refined kerosene based solvent known as Stoddards solvent. WD-40 is a light lubricant and a not so good penetrating oil.
"WD-40" is abbreviated from the term "Water Displacement, 40th formula", suggesting it was the result of the 40th attempt to create the product.[1] The spray, composed of various hydrocarbons, was originally designed to be used by Convair to protect the outer skin of the Atlas missile from rust and corrosion.
If you want good corrosion protection use something like Fluid Film.
 

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Not a good choice? Wasn't that its original purpose? Its contains a refined kerosene based solvent known as Stoddards solvent. WD-40 is a light lubricant and a not so good penetrating oil.


If you want good corrosion protection use something like Fluid Film.
The original design of crazy glue was a chemical way of suturing wounds during the second world war until the soldier could receive proper medical treatment. That doesn't mean it was good at it.

Furthermore, unless you're going to gas up an atlas missile and drive it down the road in the winter, you're talking about a completely different application that has very little to do with this entire thread.

WD-40 is simply too thin to provide anything but very short term rust protection. There's a good reason all undercoating sprays and oils are thick as snot.
 

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The original design of crazy glue was a chemical way of suturing wounds during the second world war until the soldier could receive proper medical treatment. That doesn't mean it was good at it.

Furthermore, unless you're going to gas up an atlas missile and drive it down the road in the winter, you're talking about a completely different application that has very little to do with this entire thread.

WD-40 is simply too thin to provide anything but very short term rust protection. There's a good reason all undercoating sprays and oils are thick as snot.
Super glue, or a variant of it, is in fact still used in the place of sutures. I've had Dermabond used on me a couple times in fact. It works.....
I take it you have never actually used a low viscosity inhibitor? The problem with the thick stuff is it just covers, it doesn't flow or penetrate into small crevices very well. There is little protection in the hidden spots where it can't get to...unlike moisture, which is everywhere, and when you wash a car any corrosion casing agent get into every little crevice. Good corrosion inhibitors don't really need to be thick or gooey, they just need to provide complete coverage and remain in place during the time you need them to. Believe it or not, diesel fuel works quite well. Did that for years a long time ago on winter snow removal equipment. It doesn't last forever but as long as you give it a quick refresh after a thorough post storm cleaning and power washing the frames and suspension parts never rusted. Of course, the rules are different now and the thick gooey stuff is necessary to keep less viscous liquids from possibly dripping on to the road and causing environmental contamination.
 

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Super glue, or a variant of it, is in fact still used in the place of sutures. I've had Dermabond used on me a couple times in fact. It works.....
I take it you have never actually used a low viscosity inhibitor? The problem with the thick stuff is it just covers, it doesn't flow or penetrate into small crevices very well. There is little protection in the hidden spots where it can't get to...unlike moisture, which is everywhere, and when you wash a car any corrosion casing agent get into every little crevice. Good corrosion inhibitors don't really need to be thick or gooey, they just need to provide complete coverage and remain in place during the time you need them to. Believe it or not, diesel fuel works quite well. Did that for years a long time ago on winter snow removal equipment. It doesn't last forever but as long as you give it a quick refresh after a thorough post storm cleaning and power washing the frames and suspension parts never rusted. Of course, the rules are different now and the thick gooey stuff is necessary to keep less viscous liquids from possibly dripping on to the road and causing environmental contamination.
I have in fact used thin corrosion inhibitors. Having used them I know one important fact about them - they don't last! Of course any petroleum products will prevent corrosion. The problem here is that thin ones are simply not suitable for the underside of your car. They wash away far too easily - this is, once again, why rust prevention products for the underside of your vehicle are thick.

We're not talking about a machined part sitting on a bench. Those are quite ideal for thin oils.

So, here's the million dollar question. Do you want to constantly spray a thin oil again and again OR do you want to put something thick on there, such as grease, and not worry about it again until you're ready to clean and repaint the part?

Considering that most people aren't going to keep reapplying the thin stuff (or know to), I stand by my statement that WD-40 is pretty well worthless here.

And I think we're all aware of glue for closing wounds. Hospitals have been using it for decades. You're missing the point here. It took many years until it was a viable option. Not all products work as well as they advertise for every application or even well at all at first - if ever.

The message is pick the product appropriate for the application. You could tell me that gear oil is a lubricant and you'd be correct. That doesn't make it a good idea to put it in your engine.
 

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I have been using Krown Rust Control Krown Rust Control . I think they are only in Canada and USA and got no rust on the 250K + kms 2012 mazda . I spray one a year (best on a hot day product penetrates best) cost about $100 -120CDN . They do discount yearly returning and alot free stuff given away..movie tickets , extra free product.
Toronto weather we got Damp / Cold/ salted roads / ... Only thing i dont like about it is the first week after application any product on hot metal cooks off and smells a bit and excess drips off...
 

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Most of the heavy ones don't last long either if you go to the car wash and have the underbody wash done, as many do all the time. I find that most thin oil based products stay put even after a wash. Kerosene and related oils may not be as visible but they actually get into the surface and need solvent based cleaners to remove completely. Thick corrosion prevention agents like Fluid film will eventually just get blasted off by the car wash jets and cleaning products as most of these modern products are using organic based substances like lamb fat. We used Fluid Film in a semi-commercial environment where regular cleaning was a must, and it never lasted an entire winter season. In most cases it was gone after the first couple washes. The other issue with thick products that are applied by spraying is they are a dirt collector, and if this mix gets in between moving parts it can cause those parts to stop moving....
However, if the car is already exhibiting signs of corrosion as in the OP, applying FF will not help much as it won't act to stop the oxidation, where a petroleum based oil will slow it considerably.
 

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My 3's underside was showing rust when I bought it new in October of 2015. It was built in April. The shocks in particular had already started to rust.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for your help.

I'm going to try this product available in the UK which performed well in comparative tests with similar products XCP™ PROTECTION | XCP™ RUST BLOCKER™

How much corrosion is visible on your suspension links / arms and other components after 3 years so I can judge if my car is typical?
 

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I wouldn't worry too much of rust on suspension components. Once you get salt on it once rust will start and not stop.
I just keep an eye on the subframe and unibody. No rust there on mine, 2015 in the northeast.
 

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Most of the heavy ones don't last long either if you go to the car wash and have the underbody wash done, as many do all the time. I find that most thin oil based products stay put even after a wash. Kerosene and related oils may not be as visible but they actually get into the surface and need solvent based cleaners to remove completely. Thick corrosion prevention agents like Fluid film will eventually just get blasted off by the car wash jets and cleaning products as most of these modern products are using organic based substances like lamb fat. We used Fluid Film in a semi-commercial environment where regular cleaning was a must, and it never lasted an entire winter season. In most cases it was gone after the first couple washes. The other issue with thick products that are applied by spraying is they are a dirt collector, and if this mix gets in between moving parts it can cause those parts to stop moving....
However, if the car is already exhibiting signs of corrosion as in the OP, applying FF will not help much as it won't act to stop the oxidation, where a petroleum based oil will slow it considerably.
Washing my car including underside regularly and undercoating every fall, you're more than welcome to take a look at my car when I pull the brakes in the spring. There's always a thin coat left from the winter.

I suggested MP grease because I've done this. This is not some obscure these post I read in the depths of. The internet somewhere.

My old car was soon to go to the junkyard but I wasn't ready to toss it yet. The brake lines and oil pan were rotting out badly. I wanted to get through the winter until I had enough saved up to buy the 3 outright. Slathered some grease on both with a disposable glove. Even still washing that car, it was still there in the spring in a thick unbroken coat. That action saved me from having to install new brake lines and a new oil pan just to get the car through another 8 months.

Looks like the OP has made a selection at this point.
 

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I see many gen 1 & 2 & 3 with rust around rear wheels and 3rd brake light. Now that what is visible . I doubt they had the car sprayed with some sort of rust retard / inhibitor. I knew i was going to keep this car (2012) well past 10years and was going to mod it ... After 3 - 4 years (applied product evevry year) i would find out ..did it work , is there rust , did the car stay clean underneath ( i should video it next time she is up on the lift) and I do not have any rust visible. If you intend on keeping the car a long time then do it !
It will keep all under parts from premature deterioration ...
Cheers!
 

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My 3's underside was showing rust when I bought it new in October of 2015. It was built in April. The shocks in particular had already started to rust.
Not surprising, especially if the car was shipped from Japan. A long trip across the ocean followed by weeks or even months sitting in a lot at the port means lots of exposure to a high salt environment.
 

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Fluid film is the answer. Spray underside and back of body panels every 2 years before winter. I have a truck 25 yrs old, not a spec of rust anywhere (living in the rust belt). The stuff is crazy good.
 

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Not surprising, especially if the car was shipped from Japan. A long trip across the ocean followed by weeks or even months sitting in a lot at the port means lots of exposure to a high salt environment.
I heard they are shipped in huge car transport ships with Nitrogen filled storage bays ...ha..kidding
 

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Thanks for your help.

I'm going to try this product available in the UK which performed well in comparative tests with similar products XCP™ PROTECTION | XCP™ RUST BLOCKER™

How much corrosion is visible on your suspension links / arms and other components after 3 years so I can judge if my car is typical?
As you are in the UK, you really, really ought to check the reputation of Bilt Hamber's products (origin of which is England). The S-50 interior cavity protector, the UB (brown under-body spray), and the UC (clear under-body spray). I am really going to try to get the S-50 and the UB into Canada. Might have to import them from Australia... They are not available in North America. If you check out the discussion about that product, you would see a lot of praise on its abilities... 'way more than Waxoyl or Dinitrol, both of which are common enough in Europe.
 
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