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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have either one on there mazda 3? Do you recommend it? The JBR is $185 shipped to me and the corksport is $207 shipped to me. They look exactly the same. pretty sure one copied the other one,just like aem,k&n,injen and the other aftermarket intakes out there copie each other.
 

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If you're going to get a short-ram intake, you'd be best off investing in a way of isolating it from the heat of the engine bay...

...maybe come up with a custom solution that pulls air from a cooler area of the front of the car?
 

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Anyone have either one on there mazda 3? Do you recommend it? The JBR is $185 shipped to me and the corksport is $207 shipped to me. They look exactly the same. pretty sure one copied the other one,just like aem,k&n,injen and the other aftermarket intakes out there copie each other.
Have a look at this thread:

http://mazda3revolution.com/forums/...e-performance/96186-corksport-vs-jbr-sri.html

The main difference between models was the air straightener, which has an impact on fuel trims. The version on the CS SRI was not ideal for the skyactiv MAF sensor (its more compatible with the older MZR engine MAF sensor). CS mentioned a while back that they are working on a new straightener, but didn't post whether its being shipped out on new models or whether it was completed & what it looks like. If they are still using the old straightener, I recommend taking it out or buying JBR's version since their air straightener is better suited for the MAF sensor. I've done tests with the JBRs style air straightener vs. no air straightener, and I found that long term fuel trims were better using JBRs straightener (close to 0% readout in LTFTs). Overall, the calibration was less thrown off in the following order: JBR/CS SRI with JBR air straightener > CS/JBR SRI with no straightener > CS/JBR SRI with CS straightener. If you are getting a custom tune (not tablet OTS), the tuner should calibrate your MAF sensor either way. That's an advantage for a custom tune if your are running a SRI. Note that a drop in filter in the stock airbox will not throw-off MAF sensor calibration.

EDIT: Based on your username, it appears you have a 2.5L. The above reasoning is for the 2.0L products. From what I remember, both the JBR and CS SRIs for the 2.5L have well designed air straighteners.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you're going to get a short-ram intake, you'd be best off investing in a way of isolating it from the heat of the engine bay...

...maybe come up with a custom solution that pulls air from a cooler area of the front of the car?
I am going to copy aem and use the stock air intake inlet and some custom heat shielding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Please let us know what you use, and how to do it! I've been dealing with the heatsoak on mine for nearly the past 3 summers :rockon 1:
Where so you live? I am surprised that someome besides corksport has made a cold air direct inlet for tje mazda 3,if I had a r&d shop I would make a custom direct ram air inlet.
 

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I live in Georgia, USA, and I just have a JBR powerpath intake (SRI). It obviously doesn't come with any sort of heat shielding whatsoever, so I wanted to know exactly what material to use to make a DIY cold air box in order to help fend off heatsoak.

I'm assuming the best material would be thermoplastic with some sort of thermal reflector on the outside of the box, along with the attachment of the OEM 'snorkel' inlet to grab air from in front of the radiator/under the hood's weather seal.
 

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My vote goes to JBR... As for the mod, I left the bottom half of the airbox in w/ the 'ram air scoop' attached. No idea if it does anything. Oh well.

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My vote goes to JBR... As for the mod, I left the bottom half of the airbox in w/ the 'ram air scoop' attached. No idea if it does anything. Oh well.

That's what I want to do but I will make a heat shield for the back and top to direct the incoming cold air to the filter. Thanks for the pic??
 

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By design I have not seen one modified OEM air box or any aftermarket CAI that really is been thought out fully and design to work as well as they could be.
Also the phrase "heat soak" seems to be a little misunderstood.

IMHO if you are not ROAD racing and/or running in higher engine speeds for long periods of time than why spend the money on a CAI. There are so many other things to invest that will net better human positive feedback.

I might also throw into the thought that many of you dont realize that the ECU needs to have warmer IAT to operate the most efficient functions of engines operations as the complex algorithms program for the newer Mazda ECU was design for. By attempting to lower the IAT many times as proven empirically through data logging of some better engineering aftermarket part developers you lower the total output of the engine.

Now I realize a few of you have posted your interesting results using an after market CAI or a modified OEM air box but yet I have not read any controlled measures taken to see if they even follow the basic 5 steps of scientific process to confirm results and more a narrow and simple sampling of the best information to report on this forum about IATs from the CAI or modified OEM air box. .

10/4 copy that carry on... :grin2:
 

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Well, then...THAT'S EXACTLY WHAT I'M TALKING ABOUT!!!

Why'd you go with Injen?
Got it for a good price, it had a blue Amsoil dry filter too.

None of the SRIs out there really do much but make noise. You may see a couple hp when IATs are low but if left to themselves with no isolation from warm under hood air, they can reduce power to a noticeable extent. When moving slowly in traffic, IATs can easily reach 170°F+ in short order. The stock box offers some protection from under hood heat but eventually heat soak sets in, as it will with any intake box placed in that environment. The insulated CS box offers a bit more protection but again heat soak is inevitable. The insulation just holds off the effects somewhat longer at slower speeds. At highway speeds where air can flow through the grill, IATs are close to what you would see with the factory box, maybe a degree or two lower, or just above ambient.
As far as warm air being good, that depends on the definition of "good". Some people in the hyper-miler crowd actually do things to increase IATs. Hot air is less dense, so any given volume of hot air contains less oxygen than the same volume of cold dense air. Less oxygen means less fuel is required to produce correct AFRs, so in theory gas mileage goes up. However, this also means the combustion charge going into the cylinder has less fuel and less oxygen, so it makes less power. If thats what you want, then high IATs are good.
If you are looking for more power, higher IATs are not good. You want colder, denser air that contains more oxygen by volume. More oxygen means the ECU will add more fuel to the mix to get the right AFRs, so you get more power. This usually ends up lowering your mpg numbers.
 

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I suspect these things are the same on Mazda3 as they are on Miata: they make nothing but noise, and typically cause loss of a few hp, or more than a few in hot weather. I'd be happy to be proven wrong, but I'm not holding my breath.

Mazda engineering tends not to leave much on the table, and the OEM NA Miata intake with paper filter cartridge easily flows more air than a stock engine can pump, at least below 6500 rpm or so. As far as reducing intake air temperature, dyno runs with the hood open are meaningless. If the airbox isn't sealed from the underhood environment, with fresh air ducted in from outside, it ain't a "CAI," period. Even then, as with my Miata's Randall intake, all it can do is prevent loss of power in hot weather, and in my case allow running more timing advance on 87 octane without pinging in summer. (The Randall is a carbon fiber duct that feeds the stock airbox from a hole cut through the firewall into the plenum at the base of the windshield, a source of high pressure already used by the HVAC.)

I don't know about the 3, but on the NA the long intake crossover tube includes a Helmholz resonator that eliminates a small dip in midrange torque. Folks who imagine their SRIs make them smarter than Mazda engineers end up with less power, a midrange bog, heat soak, and more dirt in their engines. The worst example is K&N, an ineffective filter that can ruin a mass airflow sensor. Spend your rice budget elsewhere.
 
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