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Subaru Defector
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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for opinions.

I have the 3rd gen Mazda 3 2.5L intake from Corksport. I was wondering if it would be wise to test fit it on my new 2019.

It appears to fit (without actually trying yet) but I'm concerned that whatever minor changes were made to the 2019 engine would render the 2018 intake inop.

The reality is that the CS intake is just some tubing, a filter and something to bolt the MAF sensor to. It's not overly complicated so maybe I'm overthinking it.

Any input is appreciated.
 

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I would wait for the tuning companies to run their testing on the 2019 Gen 4 and produce a model-specific product. Unless you want to beta test on your own engine and are cool with that risk. Just my opinion, though.
 

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It's the same engine, so the intake should work just fine. The benefit may not be worth taking the risk though. An SRI just makes the engine sound a little louder, but doesn't do much else without proper tuning.
CK
 

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Considering the effect of ambient air intake temperature on BHP output, why would anyone use an SRI if a performance gain is the objective?
 

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I have a heat shield that came with my K&N that helps control that.. CorkSport also sells a cold air box that surrounds their SRI cone to keep AIT under control.

I plan on doing some data logs using the MazdaEdit program with my K&N 69 Typhoon cold air intake installed and then do some with the stock cold air intake that comes with the car. Now that I have an exhaust and a tune, the added noise from the K&N isn't really needed. If it's not improving the v-dyno results over the stock intake, why should I keep using it? I plan on doing multiple runs with the K&N and then with the stock setup on the same stretch of road under the same conditions and then comparing the results...get an average max HP and torque for each setup.
CK
 

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Considering the effect of ambient air intake temperature on BHP output, why would anyone use an SRI if a performance gain is the objective?
Ambient air temp has nothing to do with it. In fact, the closer to ambient the better. The problem with an open SRI is under hood air temps. Intake air temps spike considerably when using an SRI that has no means of excluding under hood air or bringing in colder outside air. The 2.5 does benefit slightly from an SRI if IATs are kept down, and also an SRI can help a bit when doing a tune.
 

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Ambient air temp has nothing to do with it. In fact, the closer to ambient the better. The problem with an open SRI is under hood air temps. Intake air temps spike considerably when using an SRI that has no means of excluding under hood air or bringing in colder outside air. The 2.5 does benefit slightly from an SRI if IATs are kept down, and also an SRI can help a bit when doing a tune.
Ambient air intake temperature has everything to do with BHP output since it's part of the standard upon which BHP ratings are based (refer to SAE standard J1349). The cooler the ambient AT, the greater the BP output and the reverse is true. This is why ingesting underhood intake air will always lead to a performance decrement since it's always hotter than ambient.
 

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Ambient air intake temperature has everything to do with BHP output since it's part of the standard upon which BHP ratings are based (refer to SAE standard J1349). The cooler the ambient AT, the greater the BP output and the reverse is true. This is why ingesting underhood intake air will always lead to a performance decrement since it's always hotter than ambient.
No kidding....but you are getting your terms a bit confused. There is no "ambient air intake temperature". There is ambient temperature, which is the temperature of the outside air that surrounds the vehicle, and there is intake air temperature, which is a measurement of the air passing through the intake tract. Colder IATs are always better, colder ambient temps are always better..
 

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No kidding....but you are getting your terms a bit confused. There is no "ambient air intake temperature". There is ambient temperature, which is the temperature of the outside air that surrounds the vehicle, and there is intake air temperature, which is a measurement of the air passing through the intake tract. Colder IATs are always better, colder ambient temps are always better..
I think the confusion exists on your part. Of course there is an ambient air intake temperature. In fact it is designated as 77 deg F, (25 deg C) according to the SAE standard. When BHP ratings are calculated according to the SAE standard, the ambient air intake temperature is that which exists at the intake of the induction tract. The internal induction tract temperature will always be higher than ambient but that is not part of the calculation.
 

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Can we just agree that keeping the IAT as low as possible is a good thing?

An SRI, with proper shielding and design, should keep the IAT at about the same level as the stock cold air intake, which is our main goal. If it isn't able to do that, then it will negatively impact performance. Hotter and leaner air is a bad thing... mmmmkkk...
CK
 

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Unfortunately we are not in the position of calculating power according to a standard. That standard is for testing purposes only so valid comparisons can be made between different engines being tested at different locations. All it does is allow you to compare power out put without the effects of temperature and pressure....it has no bearing on actual real world power at any given time. In the real world, there is ambient temperature, defined as "the current air temperature —the overall temperature of the outdoor air that surrounds us", and there is intake air temperature, defined as "the temperature of the air mass passing through the intake tract at any given moment as recorded by the IAT sensor".

The internal induction tract temperature will always be higher than ambient but that is not part of the calculation
That statement makes no sense in the real world, its only valid if you are trying to compare two different engines being testing in two different locations. Of course the temperature of the air passing through the intake tract will be part of the real world power calculation. The IAT sensor uses the actual IAT along with the mass air flow numbers and other sensors to determine proper fuel mixture. That is why those senors exist. You can't just arbitrarily assign a number and expect everything else to fall in line. With an SRI, the IATs can spike quickly from ambient to well over 170 ° F depending on traffic conditions, and the IATs stay for the most part 2 ° or 3 ° above ambient when the car is moving. High IAT numbers mean thinner air, which means less oxygen available in the air mass, so less fuel is called for to keep the AFRs correct. As a result, there is a lesser volume of fuel/air mix available for combustion, so power will be less.
Maybe you should put some instrumentation on your car so you can see what is actually happening under the hood......
 

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Getting back to my first post in this thread where I questioned the utility of using a SRI as a performance aid, I have a few additional comments to make regarding the effect of ambient air intake temperature on brake horsepower output. The rating of 186 BHP of the 2.5 L SkyActiv-G engine is based on measurements specified by the SAE standard J1349 where power is measured under the following parameters:
Ambient intake air temperature: 77 deg F (25 deg C; 298.15 K - absolute temperature scale)
Barometric pressure: 29.235" Hg (990 mb)
Air density: .0722 lbs/cu.ft. (1.1568 kg/cu.meter)
Relative humidity: 0%
Elevation: 0 ft.

If these parameters are not available, then the obtained BHP is corrected to account for any variation, making possible accurate comparisons among engines regardless of the measurement environment. Considering ONLY the relationship of intake air temperature to BHP, the power varies essentially as the square root of the change in ABSOLUTE temperature.
References: High Speed Combustion Engines, 16th Edition, by P. M. Heldt, p 638
The Design and tuning of Competition Engines, 5th Edition, by Philip H. Smith, p.370-371

Thus, to calculate the change in BHP output as a function of change in ambient intake air temperature, take the square root of the quotient of the absolute standard temperature divided by the absolute observed temperature, and multiply that by the rated BHP output.

BHP, change = square root [ (std. temp/observed temp) ] x BHP, rated

To calculate BHP at any given intake air temperature, simply convert that temperature in either degrees F or C to absolute (K).
To convert temperatures from one scale to another, go to:

Now for those of you who have thrown up your hands in disgust at this treatment there is a simple way to calculate change in BHP/temperature relationships for those of us who don't like working with arithmetic by using an online calculator. Go to :
www.csgnetwork.com/relhumhpcalc.html

Although labeled Relative Horsepower Calculator - Relative Humidity Factors, it can be used to determine temperature/HP relationships simply by plugging in the temperature of interest in the 'Enter Current Air Temperature' box. Plug in 29.235" Hg for barometric pressure and 0% for relative humidity and elevation.

Since the intake air for the car is normally drawn from outside the engine compartment, it is normally just slightly above the ambient as long as the car is in constant motion. On my old Mazda Protégé with outside air intake I had installed a digital temperature gauge with the sensor in the entrance to the airbox. In bumper-to-bumper or stop-and-go traffic, I occasionally saw intake temperatures as high as 140 deg F. Once in motion, the temperatures of course dropped but for those with intakes drawing underhood air, the temperatures will always be some measure above ambient.

As examples of the intake air temperature/BHP relationship, using the online calculator as outlined above, here are some representative examples for our 2.5 L SkyActiv-G engine.
77 deg F (25 deg C) = 186 BHP
30 deg F (-1 deg C) = 196 BHP
100 deg F (38 deg C) = 182 BHP
140 deg F (60 deg C) = 174 BHP

Thus it would seem that the SRI imposes a power penalty and so I question why one would choose to utilize one. Just curious.
 

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Well thats a looooong way to go to say something that most here already know. An SRI is mostly cosmetic and it makes loud ricer car noises. Other than that, the factory intake opening is just a bit too small for optimum air flow on the 2.5. A properly designed SRI will allow the 2.5 to breathe better, so it will make a few more hp, maybe 5 or so. Not a huge increase. If you are going to use an SRI use an enclosure and have a means to introduce as much outside air into that enclosure as possible.
 

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Subaru Defector
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Discussion Starter #15
This is great info and all, but it doesn't really answer the "will it fit/work" question.

I'm not chasing horsepower, I'm after the extra induction noise. The 2019s are very quiet.

I'm leaning towards waiting for a 2019-specific intake to be released. Assuming it doesn't take ages.
 

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It's the same engine, so the intake should work just fine. The benefit may not be worth taking the risk though. An SRI just makes the engine sound a little louder, but doesn't do much else without proper tuning.
CK
See above. Guinea pig time.
CK
 

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Subaru Defector
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Discussion Starter #17
Welp, it fits. Install was exactly the same as the 2018 if not easier.

As a reminder, I'm aware of the minimal to no performance gains that an intake provides, especially one of this design (SRI). I was chasing the increased induction noise.

That said, the increased noised is still quieter than it was on the 2018. I imagine due to the quieter cabin. I also remember Sport mode in the 2018 making a dramatic difference in the volume of the intake. That does not happen in the 2019. Again, maybe due to the quieter cabin or maybe a change in the way Sport mode behaves.

Take a look.

I'll continue to keep an eye on CorkSport and what (if anything) they're planning with the 2019 models.

273059
 

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Cool. Thanks for sharing this. (y)
CK
 

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Welp, it fits. Install was exactly the same as the 2018 if not easier.

As a reminder, I'm aware of the minimal to no performance gains that an intake provides, especially one of this design (SRI). I was chasing the increased induction noise.
As my hero John Wayne used to say: "A man's gotta do what a man's gotta do."
I'm glad you obtained the extra induction noise even though it was not as noisy as that for which you had hoped.
 

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Welp, it fits. Install was exactly the same as the 2018 if not easier.

As a reminder, I'm aware of the minimal to no performance gains that an intake provides, especially one of this design (SRI). I was chasing the increased induction noise.

That said, the increased noised is still quieter than it was on the 2018. I imagine due to the quieter cabin. I also remember Sport mode in the 2018 making a dramatic difference in the volume of the intake. That does not happen in the 2019. Again, maybe due to the quieter cabin or maybe a change in the way Sport mode behaves.

Take a look.

I'll continue to keep an eye on CorkSport and what (if anything) they're planning with the 2019 models.
Any gains on highway fuel economy?
 
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