2004 to 2020 Mazda 3 Forum and Mazdaspeed 3 Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Planning to flush the brake fluid in the spring, probably long overdue as my 3 is nearly 4 years old.

The normal procedure is to start bleeding with the farthest from the reservoir and work your way up. So rear right, rear left, front right and finish with front left.

However, I read a vague post somewhere that Mazda uses two separate loops in the brakes. As in, left and right sides are separated. This would mean the correct way would be bleed rear right then front right and go to the other side back to front.

Any truth to this? Can anyone elaborate?

As far as abs goes, I don't have the equipment to manually actuate the abs module, so I think I might have to take a miss on bleeding that. Would be nice if it could be done withbmy phone and the elm327, but I have seen no software to do so. Any thoughts? Not looking to spend a pile of money on a device to do this.

Maybe I can disconnect it and apply power to the pins for the solenoid....I've done crazier things...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I'm fairly certain a 2 circuit design is common across makes and models. It's done to keep some braking power if a leak develops, as only the circuit with a leak won't have full pressure. Given that, I have never logically understood the reason for a specific bleed order, but follow the recommended pattern since no extra work is involved.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JoeMini

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you both. My last car was a 2004 Hyundai accent so this two circuit design is new to me. Did not know that this is standard now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
353 Posts
I change out the brake fluid in the reservoir once or twice/yr. This extends the need to flush because it'll catch most of the absorbed water there. Flush is good for getting rid of slight bit of debris that might build up. Could always tell when the old Benz needed it (about every couple years in the 25 years we had it). One of the rear pads would not retract fully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Dual hydraulic circuit brake systems have been standard forever. Diagonal wheels are on each circuit. If one circuit fails, straight line stability under braking is maintained because one brake on each side remains energized. And since the front brakes do most of the braking, one of the front brakes remains functional.

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top