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I have mentioned that for me I would consider it a mistake to remove the OEM engine coolant-to-ATF cooler in place of an aerial style ATF cooler 'cuz it removes the early heat-up function that the OEM style cooler provides. BUT, I would add the aerial style cooler for three seasons of the year and I would add ball valves to make for easy switching-in and switching-out action...

Just adding this: I would also (in addition to the addition of the aux. air-to-liquid cooler in front of the rad) advocate exercising control over one or both of the radiator / A/C condensor fans based on monitoring the ATF temp (of course, also allowing engine temp control over same... and A/C system control over same) and then also actively controlling the fan to achieve no more than 185F ATF temp, if possible.
 

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Engine Oil temperature with the sensor in the pan between 205-230F and the coolant runs 170-214F with IAT at about 0 to 30F degrees above ambient temperatures , 10-15% throttle plate position and steady highway driving 65-70 mph. There are lots of things the ultimately effects all the temperatures but these seem to be the range high and low after the engine and transmission reaches operating temperature for a drive cycle. I personally do not like to have the automatic transmission running fluid temperature more then 200F and ultimately at about 180-190F.
 

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I don't believe in lifetime fluids so I want to change the transmission fluid and filter (2016 3 i Sport Sedan) Should I do this a couple of times to get all of the old fluid out,or do a drain and fill only first and then do the filter and fluid the second time? Thanks
gen3 mazda3's have lifetime tranny fluid?
cool!

how about coolant?
 

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in order to do it right you need to unscrew the oil Pan and change also the transmission filter.


the fluid capcity is around 8qt but you will drain only about 5qt so get 5-6qt
 

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FYI... TSB on ATF filling. https://www.rx8club.com/attachments/general-automotive-49/193505d1362869611-s-k-y-bulletins-atf-fz-required-skyactiv-drive-6-speed-automatic-transaxle.pdf

They appear to intimate that the engine coolant-cooled ATF heat exchanger is not typically removed from the side of the A/T case. They indicate WHEN (not if) you change-out your A/T - you get a new cooler shipped with it.

This applies to certain years of Mazda3, Mazda6, CX5... but I think it carries-over to subsequent years for the 3, 6, and CX-5...

I am sure that commercially you can get new o-rings / seals for between the heat exchanger and the case of the A/T. They may also be available from Mazda. Not sure if the torque value of the capscrews holding the exchanger to the case are available. I fully expect that they are threaded-in to aluminum, so the torque values will be quite low, and demand the use of an inch-pounds calibrated torque wrench.

Final point, here, is that this TSB by Mazda North America seems to intimate that the fluid does not need to be changed. Quite a few of us subscribe to the notion that YES, the A/T benefits from at least 1 X per 50,000 miles fluid changes (oh, mebe 3 drops... plus a filter change, pan and magnet clean-up).
Do you have a document that refers to the later model years? Thanks!
275142
 

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Do you have a document that refers to the later model years? Thanks!
View attachment 275142
'Fraid not. What is good and cool, BTW, about this Skyactiv A/T is that it i) appears to NOT be as sensitive to fluid level as some other transaxles are; and ii) it actually has a dipstick... not a weir tube. I suspect no changes have been made for the later transaxles.... but i can't be sure.
 

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I should note one other 'real important matter: this dipstick tends to accumulate road debris while in operation. Removal of same without first removing airbox to gain unobstructed access for prior cleaning is REALLY not advised. Remove airbox, clean all around, remove dipstick carefully, remove and clean o ring on dipstick, reassemble, get car on ramps.... level, do a dry run to see you can operate by feel (from underneath) with airbox etc all in place... WITHOUT knocking any adjacent grit/dirt/debris into the area near the dipstick... then start from cool and figure out how to meas. 50 degree C transmission fluid. Rig up the pour/fluid replenishment system too... prior and ensure that "threading" your longneck funnel from above does not shake loose dirt, debris. Cleanliness and planning is of paramount importance... {To see some of what I'm talking about, view here: Guide: - ATF Drain/Fill and go to post No. 98 (photos shown)}. The example shown is of a CX5... obviously more room, bigger access than a 3.... but just to give you an idea...

Good thing to do is to retighten (check for correct torque) valvebody bolts while pan is off... using a precision in-lbs torque wrench.
 

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I believe a member here reported being at 300,000 miles on his '14 automatic Mazda3 without problems, and he has not changed the transmission oil or the filter.

Maybe Mazda's claim of lifetime fluid is valid.
Sitting at 115-116k on my 14 Mazda 3, and this has not helped me decide if i'll change my fluid or not.....
 

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I just change as much as I can on a regular basis without removing the filter.. Unless you have a hoist, changing the auto filter is about the messiest job you can do on a car.
 

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No... repacking wheel bearings (when that was typically done) or rebuilding cv joints is messier.... hehe. Hey haven't you guys heard of ramps + an inch-lbs. torque wrench?
 

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Yeah, the stuff is not cheap. You could try googling for a potentially better price. In any case, I would be sure to use the recommended Mazda-labeled fluid.

I've seen reports that it takes between 3.5 and 4 quarts if the fluid is just drained from the port and the filter is not changed. Perhaps the best approach would be to drain the old fluid and measure how much comes out to determine how much to put back in. If desired, the proper amount can be confirmed later via the dipstick, but Mazda recommends the dipstick level be checked when the fluid is at 122F. WTH is up with that? That temperature falls between cold-tranny cold and hot-tranny-hot. It's Goldie Lock's not-too-hot and not-too cold. I think I'll just see what level it's at when, say, the fluid is at some ambient temperature after sitting overnight and then make sure I can match that level at about the same ambient the next day after refilling.

The decision on whether to change the tranny filter or not is a personal one, of course. I haven't read of anyone who ran into problems by not inserting a new filter. As always, you pays your money and takes your choice. However, if the filter is changed, I've seen it reported that it will take between 5.2 and 5.7 quarts, because the old filter and the area behind it retains some additional fluid that is lost with filter change-out. Again, this can be later checked with the dipstick foolishness I just went through.

The problem for me with changing the filter involves several things. One is that that along with removing a number of retaining bolts holding the pan on, Mazda recommends new ones be used in their place and, of course, the bolts should be secured at the proper torque level, which I'm told is 61 to 78 INCH pounds. So, you'll need a torque wrench that reads inch pounds, as well as new bolts which, I've read, a lot of people don't actually get and, instead, just reuse the old ones. I haven't heard anyone say reusing the old ones causes any problems, and I doubt it does.

Then, in addition, there is no replaceable gasket on the tranny pan, so you must scrape all the old RTV sealant from both surfaces and reapply the same before waiting an hour or so to let it cure before pouring in the new fluid. I hate it when I have to do that.

I haven't changed my auto tranny fluid yet because I have less than 50K miles on my car, but one of these days I'll be in the decision-making mode of: do I do it, and if I do it, what "it" do I do?
 

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The merit of changing the trans fluid can be debated until we're all blue in the face, so I'm not going there. If I had to choose, I'd change it like many of you. In the past, I've always flushed out the trans around 120k kms.

How you change the fluid is important. My past method is this: drain and drop pan. Clean the magnets and pan. Replace filter and reinstall pan. Fill up. Disconnect cooler line and get someone to start the engine. Bleed fluid this way until it starts to spit, turn the car off immediately. Refill and repeat until fluid is clean.

No special equipment is required. That only makes the job quicker and less messy. An alternative to running the car is to use a drill pump.

The lazy way would be to drain just the pan and refill but to do this far more frequently. I'm not sure if these cars have the drain plug on the pan as mine is MT.

I figure if you're going to do this might as well do the best job you can.

Oh and do this job on a tarp no matter how you do it. It's messy.
 

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BTW there are no cooler lines. Coolant-to-ATF cooler is bolted right to the transaxle case. Aside from this, just in my opinion, disconnecting lines out to / from the ATF cooler in the rad (for cars with external lines) is sketchy 'cuz it interupts lubricant flow to whatever is FED directly by the cooled ATF. Me, I advocate only drain, drop/clean pan + magnet(s) / change filter, refill.... then some additional drain + fill steps at 50,000 mi intervals. I believe there IS a drain plug, to facilitate this later drain and refill.

Now I do notice you mentioning using a drill-powered pump. Are you talking drawing suction for same from a new ATF jug, and pumping into the line from the cooler, back into the case of the transmission? If you did this, how would you guarantee i) that you would not overpressure the receiving-end of the flow? A drill pump is a positive displacement device.... and the flowrate is linear with the drill speed. You could blow out some kind of seal....?; and ii) how would you NOT overfill the transaxle doing this?
 
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