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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone,

I have an Alpine PDX-V9 and currently 2 speakers in the rear (front ones are soon to be installed).

I've had this set up for about 2 months now with no problem.

Recently, I would be playing music loud, and my amp would go into protection mode. This was odd to me because I hadn't changed anything in my set up, so why would it start now?

Anyways, I did research online and tried many fixes without success:
Checking all connections (Big 3, amp power, amp ground)
Replacing fuse (looked fine to me, but replaced it anyways)
Tighten all terminals at the amp
etc.

Eventually, I played music full blast, but only to one channel at a time (rear left, then rear right, then subwoofer). It would consistently cut out during rear left. So now I'm narrowed down to 3 things: the single channel from my amp, the wiring to the rear left speaker, or the rear left speaker itself.
I then plugged my rear right speaker into that channel with no issue. So now it's either the wire or the rear left speaker.

I removed rear left speaker and tried another one I had laying around, and the amp worked great!


So obviously there is something wrong with my speaker, but nothing visible (not that I know too much about speakers). I'm planning on contacting Alpine to see if they'll sell me just 1 speaker.

Anybody have any suggestions on how to fix my speaker so I don't spend another $100 on a new set?

Thanks


UPDATE: I checked the speaker with a multimeter and it reads 4 ohms. I'm totally stumped what is wrong with this speaker...
 

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Demon Spawn
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758 Posts
voice coil in the speaker has probably failed, it may read four ohms at idle but may get too high during use as ohms change and get higher during music playback (speaker moving) sounds like the speaker blew to me, perhaps you have your gain set too high, set it with a multimeter, no speakers hooked to it here is crutchfields instructions: https://www.crutchfield.com/S-lbzr3bf6hL0/learn/setting-amplifier-gain.html as you may have inadvertently blown it, the gain is not volume. or sometimes you get a bad speaker, i have had a few be bad out of the box and work for a week or so and fail. if you just bought them alpine should have a 1 year warranty on them and let you warranty the pair. if not look on crutchfeild or amazon for a better deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think it was the gain; it was set to 1/3. Maybe I just got a bad speaker...

Anyways, I was able to return it on Amazon, and I've already ordered new speakers.

Thanks!
 

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Demon Spawn
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758 Posts
what amp power do you put out of that amp the way it was wired? 2 channel 4ohm as it looks from your original post, and what was the rms power rating of the speakers hooked to it? and how where they hooked in series or parallel? that will help me determine if the gain was too high or if the speaker was truly bad. this site has a lot of useful info on car audio and electrical stuff that will help with wiring amps to correct ohm loads and what not: Car Alarm, Car Stereo, Mobile Video, and Cruise Control Info for Installers they have all kinds of diagrams showing how to wire just about anything you would need to into your car. might take a look there to be sure you wire them correctly before installing the new ones, as having it at the wrong ohm load at the amp can fry your amp, blow fuses and speakers. this page from them will help you tremendously: Subwoofer Wiring Diagrams (a speaker is dual voice coil if it has 2 positive and 2 negative terminals and single if it only has one each) and your amp will have a spec sheet with the power at certain impedances (ohms) try to wire your amp so that it sees the lowest ohms you can without over powering your speakers. aka if the amp will take a 2ohm load at the lowest then wiring to a 2ohm load will give you the best power output, using higher ohm loads will lower the demand on the amp but restrict power as well. so if you have 2 dual 4ohm voice coil speakers you would have a wiring option of either 1 ohm (what the amp sees) or 4 ohm (what the amp sees) depending on how you wire the voice coils to each other/the amp.

if you have 2 single voice coils at 4 ohms then you either can get 2 or 8 ohms at the amp depending on how you wire them. most multi cone or component speakers (aka door speakers) like to be run at 2-4 ohms at the amp, this provides them with adequate power, but also gives good sound quality, as lower than 2 ohms is usually only used for subs and high output medium as the lower ohms provides slightly less good power to the speaker and can cause sound issues in low quality or low power systems it can also over draw an amp not meant for it, as many 4 channel and 2 channel amps for door speaker use are not designed for 1 ohm loads, but are designed for 2 or 4 ohm loads and for this reason. door speakers need a large range of sound frequency to work with, but need less power to do so, as they are smaller and the higher the frequency gets the less power needed to make it loud. when going to low in ohm you will lose sound quality, bad in door speakers. but in a sub setup low ohm is good to get the most out of the amps power and a sub only produces bass and bass is harder to tell when it has slightly lower sound quality, as the human ear is just tuned that way. so low ohm setups for higher powered subs are good. the sub needs more power than the door speakers to produce that thump. the mid range and high frequencies especially as they get into treble from mid need very little power to produce loud and clean. that's why subs typically go from 250w-2000w and more but door speakers are typically rated from 10-150w and dedicated tweeters from around 2w-30w. that's why a good sound setup the sub part maybe 1000watts but the door speaker setup is only 300 watts for all 4 speakers and it all sounds good together, when tuned and setup right.
 

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Demon Spawn
Joined
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758 Posts
Hello everyone,

I have an Alpine PDX-V9 and currently 2 speakers in the rear (front ones are soon to be installed).

I've had this set up for about 2 months now with no problem.

Recently, I would be playing music loud, and my amp would go into protection mode. This was odd to me because I hadn't changed anything in my set up, so why would it start now?

Anyways, I did research online and tried many fixes without success:
Checking all connections (Big 3, amp power, amp ground)
Replacing fuse (looked fine to me, but replaced it anyways)
Tighten all terminals at the amp
etc.

Eventually, I played music full blast, but only to one channel at a time (rear left, then rear right, then subwoofer). It would consistently cut out during rear left. So now I'm narrowed down to 3 things: the single channel from my amp, the wiring to the rear left speaker, or the rear left speaker itself.
I then plugged my rear right speaker into that channel with no issue. So now it's either the wire or the rear left speaker.

I removed rear left speaker and tried another one I had laying around, and the amp worked great!


So obviously there is something wrong with my speaker, but nothing visible (not that I know too much about speakers). I'm planning on contacting Alpine to see if they'll sell me just 1 speaker.

Anybody have any suggestions on how to fix my speaker so I don't spend another $100 on a new set?

Thanks


UPDATE: I checked the speaker with a multimeter and it reads 4 ohms. I'm totally stumped what is wrong with this speaker...
any more updates?
 

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Demon Spawn
Joined
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758 Posts
yes that's the absolute "best" way to tune an amp and I have had those speakers in the past and really enjoyed them, alpine speakers have some of the best sound to me. not too hissy but not overly bassy either, good mix. probably best sound for the price, them or the Rockford punch p1 (they tend to make the treble more high pitched though so I prefer alpine for the more muted treble) if you have a volt meter you can set your gain very very very close to what an oscilloscope will get you, just un hook the speaker wires at the amp and use the volt meter probe then you do the square root of watts times ohms (ohms being what the amp sees not speaker rating, so if you wired to 2 ohm at the amp an example would be (EX: Square Root of 1000W RMS x 2 Ohms = Voltage for each gain control per channel.) and that works out to 44.72 volts per channel (that would be for subs obviously as your door speakers are not 1000w) those alpine are more like 150w a pair so more like 17.32 volts per channel or even half that. and you want to set it with a test tone in their pick up range, so a good one burned on a cd maybe do a slow sweep from 60hz-20,000hz or you can usually pick up pre made test tone cds at good electronics stores so if a Frys electronics is near you they have them (somewhere with more then best buy)

that amp is 5 channel so 4 door speakers and a small sub can be run off it, your currently only using 2 channels so it maybe running at too high of a power output on those channels, do you have the high pass on and tuned at all? if not use it, as it helps get more power to your door speakers and will keep them playing cleaner. if you have a sub already set the high pass to about 100hz and go up or down from there little by little till it mixes the music well. if you don't have a sub setting it closer to 150hz will get you some more mid bass but will keep them from playing super low into the bass frequencies which they "can" do but don't like to. if you need to tune the high pass lower then turn your gain down little by little as well because your introducing more strenuous tones to the speaker and it will want less power. to "tune it by ear" play your favorite song and start the gain off all the way down slowly go up until you hear distortion (easier to hear in the high and mid frequencies) then once you hear distortion turn back down slightly until you don't anymore. (do this with the high pass filter all the way down as low frequency as it will go or off if there is an off) then set the high pass until the mix sounds good and you hear what it should sound like, you may get a small amount of distortion again at this phase, once you get a high pass setting that makes them play the sound you want(all the tones you want to hear from them) set the gain again up or down (you can usually go further up with a sub in the setup as you can set the high pass higher and this allows them to play the tones they are really built for) or if no sub and you set the high pass lower then you may need to back the gain off again. also remember if your head unit has high/low pass filters use either the one on the headunit (usually not as good as the amps) or the one on the amp but not both as you get "noise" at each crossover point and the more you have the worse your system will sound. (if the amp does not let you toggle the high pass off then set it to lowest frequency and use head unit settings if you wish) you also want to d any amp tuning with the headunit at 75% max volume (not all the way up) and 75% of max will be your new max as higher then 75% of max headunit volume will get distorted easier and run the headunit hotter. kenwoods may not use this anymore but my kenwoods have always been volume level 27 as 75% because 35 was max so just do max volume number times .75 and set it there before tuning.
 
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