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I shall see if the liqui moly intake valve cleaner product does make an improvement (doing a second treatment this week). Only way easy way i can check is a do a 0-100KM time check compared to some past numbers. Ideal would be a have a look at the intakes with a camera or do a dyno. The way im thinking (walnut blast cost is about what...$250-300)
is take the cost of a blast and have the intake ports polished and enlarged for $400+ (hp gain 20+). LArger intake polished port may reduce eventual build up. Only old argument i see is that polished ports may reduce fuel / air velocity in lower rpm, which lowers torque, , but thats on non direct injection engine. Food for thought
Any carbon cleaning treatment needs to be applied directly to the valves as that is where the buildup is. This isn't going to happen using a fuel additive with a DI motor. Actual mechanical cleaning or application of a chemical type cleaner is whats needed. The best way to keep carbon off the valves is drive the car like you stole it.....馃榾
You can't really do much with the intake ports. There is a coolant jacket around the bottom of the port, and the wall between the port and the coolant passage is very, very thin.
0-60 times mean little here. Unless you have very accurate timing equipment and are able to repeat runs very consistently under the same conditions, a few tenths of a second difference that may or may not be caused by dirty valves won't be noticeable or meaningful.
 

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2012 Mazda 3 GX MT5
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Any carbon cleaning treatment needs to be applied directly to the valves as that is where the buildup is. This isn't going to happen using a fuel additive with a DI motor. Actual mechanical cleaning or application of a chemical type cleaner is whats needed. The best way to keep carbon off the valves is drive the car like you stole it.....馃榾
You can't really do much with the intake ports. There is a coolant jacket around the bottom of the port, and the wall between the port and the coolant passage is very, very thin.
0-60 times mean little here. Unless you have very accurate timing equipment and are able to repeat runs very consistently under the same conditions, a few tenths of a second difference that may or may not be caused by dirty valves won't be noticeable or meaningful.
Thanks Sensei ! So several direct product applications and /or some sort of blasting
Using a datalogger....while im driving it like i stole it twice !!
But true...difference maybe minimal...
 

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I have a laptop with datalogging software and a Scangauge that pretty much works the same way but converts the data and displays it in a simple time to speed format thats easily accessible. Getting the information isn't the real problem though. The real variable is the driver. If you do 10 runs and get 10 different times, its pretty hard to say whether the car has a problem or its just the driver not being consistent. Unless of course you did testing when the car was new and can hit the same numbers fairly consistently........then you could probably tell that something was wrong.
 

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And this is the biggest problem. Humans are terrible at consistency. Might do it with a dyno and tightly controlled conditions? Even the testing I did after cleaning the valves I fully admitted was half assed. It was only the best I could do given what I had to work with.

And then throw in cognitive bias. We tend to believe what we want to (ie. This valve clean treatment works) with no real evidence to support it.

So does it work to clean out the valves? I don't think anyone here can say for sure. I believe that under normal conditions there is no real world difference. If it was a worse buildup? Probably. I know a friend of mine with a Hyundai has horrible problems with the valve carbon but his is way worse than ours. Tends to get a lot of oil into the intake as well. I used some TB cleaner on his car just to get rid of the wet muddy crap and it made an immediate large difference in both power and fuel economy.
 

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I have a 2016 Mazda 3 2.0 and last week I head out to work and it would not go over 20 mph after restarting it would not go over 40 mph I took to a shop to shop who got it fixed but charged extremely high price I had 99,000 miles and I knew I need new plugs so they replaced them but charged me $599 plus tax for 4 new ignition coils which I could got for $40 to $90 for OEM coils on ebay. For fuel induction service they charged $187 of which $61.95 was what they called an induction kit. $121 was the labor for installing new spark plugs and $90 was labor for putting on new ignition coils. After looking up how to do this myself on youtube I realized how easy it was and how I could have saved me tons by doing most of this myself, but I needed to get it fixed in a hurry and had never had a problem like this before and I first thought it might be the transmission. They got it fixed the same day I dropped it off and it does run better than ever, but boy did it cost! the diagnostic test cost $99.00 $682.85 parts and $431.65 Labor If I ever have this problem in the distant future say 70000 to 100,000 miles down the line I will do everything but the injector service myself. I was wondering If a code reader plug in would have given me a clue as to what was causing this problem
 

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I have a 2016 Mazda 3 2.0 and last week I head out to work and it would not go over 20 mph after restarting it would not go over 40 mph I took to a shop to shop who got it fixed but charged extremely high price I had 99,000 miles and I knew I need new plugs so they replaced them but charged me $599 plus tax for 4 new ignition coils which I could got for $40 to $90 for OEM coils on ebay. For fuel induction service they charged $187 of which $61.95 was what they called an induction kit. $121 was the labor for installing new spark plugs and $90 was labor for putting on new ignition coils. After looking up how to do this myself on youtube I realized how easy it was and how I could have saved me tons by doing most of this myself, but I needed to get it fixed in a hurry and had never had a problem like this before and I first thought it might be the transmission. They got it fixed the same day I dropped it off and it does run better than ever, but boy did it cost! the diagnostic test cost $99.00 $682.85 parts and $431.65 Labor If I ever have this problem in the distant future say 70000 to 100,000 miles down the line I will do everything but the injector service myself. I was wondering If a code reader plug in would have given me a clue as to what was causing this problem
OEM Mazda NGK ignition coils do cost about $100usd each. Not sure what you are getting for 40-90 on ebay.
 
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