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You seem knowledgeable about many things automotive, this clearly just isn’t one of those things you know much about. Now post some more cartoon emojis, I’ve got other things more important than continuing this with you.
 

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Probably best not going full bore asserting about things you haven’t researched much, I did a full HID projector retrofit (D2S projectors) into the WRX so I did my homework way back in 2016.
Still awaiting an explanation.....you say you did your homework, should be easy to explain your reasoning....
 

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Can either of you post some stuff supporting your arguments? I am very unhappy withy 2015 halogens.

I know arathol has posted about his LED replacements in the past and I am inclined to go that route but I am just not sure.

Also when i was looking at those LED it didn't clearly speak of if there was a ballast like HID or issues with glare or heat output being too low to melt snown or ice buildup.

Not sure what the laws are but where i live people have all kinds of stuff in their headlights I doubt there is much if any enforcement, kind of like jay walking.
 

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Can either of you post some stuff supporting your arguments? I am very unhappy withy 2015 halogens.

Not sure what the laws are but where i live people have all kinds of stuff in their headlights I doubt there is much if any enforcement, kind of like jay walking.
IIHS tests headlights and posts their data. One might think that if it was as easy as popping in the brightest light source into any OEM projector or reflector assembly cars like the 2019 Honda Civic would get Acceptable or Good ratings. There are other federal regulations that car manufacturers have to meet, otherwise all cars would have LED light bars to make the night into day.

Only a few cars tested by IIHS get a Good rating, most don't even achieve an Acceptable rating for their headlights, either due to poor light output down the road or excess glare. IIHS has a search function on their website, so you don't have to believe me, go look up different cars, even your own (note they don't have headlight data before 2017 model year, however in that year for the Mazda 3 the Halogen versions were rated Marginal, the LED equipped versions, Acceptable):


So those are the test results I am posting, now have a random internet dude post his seat of the pants observations with emojis for evidence, and then make up your own mind. Just remember that internet dude hasn't done any basic research, since the term 'squirrel finder' seems unknown to him:


BTW You don't need to worry about the laws regulating headlights in the state where you live (USA), headlight mods are illegal in every state because vehicle headlights are federally regulated by the NHTSA. The only states where those laws would not apply are states that would agree not to accept federal highway funding, meaning none of them.

If you are going to upgrade your headlamps the only alternative that provides somewhat OEM performance and reduces glare for other drivers (meaning focussed light, no 'squirrel finder' reflecting some of that brighter light output into other drivers eyes, proper cut off of the beam) is to replace the assembly with one that has a proper projector designed for the brighter light source or open the headlamps and retrofit a projector.

Since you seem to know about car forums, a google search will reveal entire forums dedicated to the ins and outs of headlight upgrades (retrofits -- see HIDPlanet for example), and companies that cater to car enthusiasts who want to retrofit (I used The Retrofit Source):

https://www.theretrofitsource.com/?gclid=CjwKCAiAzanuBRAZEiwA5yf4ugd7YHTqXDj4vlZP5XJdCg5I4uRwr5uvGCLjxrA3DjQBep2LdJCQURoCrNAQAvD_BwE

I retrofitted the headlights in my 2015 WRX, partly because in order to bend the metal 'squirrel finder' out of the way for an HID insert that also required that the headlamps be opened. So rather than half-ass the job, I replaced the shitty WRX foggy lens projectors designed for halogen bulbs with Morimoto D2S bi-xenon projectors that worked with HID bulbs and ballasts. They were a huge improvement with a proper cut off line.

However, that process is like any other good modification, it takes a bit of time and a bit more money than just winging it.

When I shopped for cars after that I chose to only buy those that had OEM headlamps designed for either HID or LED output (my legacy had factory HID headlamps). The current gen Mazda 3 LED headlights are better than those Legacy HID's, and the other cars I cross-shopped before buying the M3 all had at least Acceptable (as rated by IIHS) LED headlamps, because it is IMHO a safety feature equal to all the others, the ability to see well at night.

I didn't even consider the top trim Civic with their LED/Acura-ish headlamps because of their poor rating (IIHS, and also what owners were saying about them, which I researched). I didn't consider a single car that only had halogens, nor would I at this point.

As to the OP, who asked about the current gen Mazda 3 LED's, this is your answer, and I agree with the other dude who said that the auto high beam function in the Mazda 3 works very quickly and very well, much better than the Legacy (I had to turn off that feature in the Subaru because it was so slow to respond to approaching cars in curves, and there are very few flat straight roads where I live)
 

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The headlights seem to light up the road very well (Preferred trim ones at least). The auto-headlights seems to work poorly in my experience, it looks like a Trans-Siberian Orchestra light show.
 

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Can either of you post some stuff supporting your arguments? I am very unhappy withy 2015 halogens.

I know arathol has posted about his LED replacements in the past and I am inclined to go that route but I am just not sure.

Also when i was looking at those LED it didn't clearly speak of if there was a ballast like HID or issues with glare or heat output being too low to melt snown or ice buildup.

Not sure what the laws are but where i live people have all kinds of stuff in their headlights I doubt there is much if any enforcement, kind of like jay walking.
OK, here is how it works in reality- IIHS fanbois aside......
For a headlight to function correctly, the light source needs to be in the correct position inside the light box so the headlight will focus and provide a proper light pattern. It really does not matter what the light source is, as long as it conforms to the design standards of the original bulb. For instance, the high beam on the Mazda 3 is a 9005 bulb in a reflector housing, the low beam is an H11 bulb in a projector housing.

You can't just use any bulb that fits the 9005 receptacle on the headlight box though. The emitter needs to be at the same point in space as the filament in the original halogen bulb and the same size as the filament. Cheap bulbs are all over the place in design and most don't work well. Our resident IIHS fanboi is quoting stuff from years ago when this was all that was available. There are lots of people out there who refuse to change, and refuse to move away from the crappy HID "conversion" that required cutting up your headlights and gluing in a cheap projector. Its one of those "thats the way its always been done so it must be right" or "it looks real cool so you need to do it" things that happen when gullible people spend too much time reading internet forums. Things are quite different today. Modern aftermarket bulb designs conform to bulb standards and function just like the incandescent bulbs.

As you can see, the LED bulb on the left has the emitter at the same spot as the halogen in the center, the cheepie bulb on the right has emitters all over the place, including on the front of the bulb. The LED on the left and the halogen both focus the same in 9005 reflector, the LED on the far right doesn't focus at all.....this is what causes the "glare", or transient light that is directed into oncoming traffic.
What most of the HID conversion fanbois don't tell you is how bad the light from those conversions can really be. These are the ones you see on the road with bright blue or reddish colors, especially along the top edges of the light pattern, the ones that really hurt your eyes. A proper headlight conversion will not only have correct light dispersion but have correct light colors also. The LED bulb above on the left produces a nice bright clean light similar to daylight.
As for the question of how well these bulbs work, well, a picture says a 1000 words

This is the low beam cutoff at about 25', pretty much the same as the halogens
Same LED bulb type in the OEM low beam projectors, as you can see they work fine....


high beam pattern, still pretty much the same as the halogens
Again, as you can see the LEDs work fine in the OEM reflectors


lighting up the road -
pictures taken all at the same time, same camera, same lens, same exposure settings
no headlights


low beams, you can see the cutoff on the right


high beams, the white shed is 500' measured from the car


You'll hear protests about light coverage, something along the lines of "but the emitters are on the sides, there will be dark spots and shadows", or "there is no hotspot" and lots of other things that are totally irrelevant. As you can see, there are no dark spots or shadows. The HID fanbois seem obsessed with the so called "hot spot", but most don't even know what that is. Just for reference, the "hotspot" term comes from headlight testing, where the hotspot is the brightest spot in the beam dispersion pattern, usually its at or just below the cutoff and directed straight ahead. In many lighting discussions that crowd seems to need to have 2 very bright points of light pointing straight ahead like pencil beams, with not much light coverage to the side. They can't accept that the same illumination can be directed ahead with similar illumination lighting the shoulder. The light still has a hotspot but its not nearly as noticeable as in those much vaunted HID conversion kits.
One problem with HIDs that isn't mentioned a lot is they get very hot, and also produce a significant amount of IR. This can sometimes burn out the reflectors in a lightbox. LEDs don't get anywhere near that level. The ones I use do have heat sinks but the operating temps are rarely above 180°F.
 

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IIHS tests headlights and posts their data. One might think that if it was as easy as popping in the brightest light source into any OEM projector or reflector assembly cars like the 2019 Honda Civic would get Acceptable or Good ratings. There are other federal regulations that car manufacturers have to meet, otherwise all cars would have LED light bars to make the night into day.

Only a few cars tested by IIHS get a Good rating, most don't even achieve an Acceptable rating for their headlights, either due to poor light output down the road or excess glare. IIHS has a search function on their website, so you don't have to believe me, go look up different cars, even your own (note they don't have headlight data before 2017 model year, however in that year for the Mazda 2 the Halogen versions were rated Marginal, the LED equipped versions, Acceptable):
Thank you for the information. I knew about the IIHS of course but didn't know they posted a qualitative review of headlight performance among the different car makes on their website. This is certainly useful information to have especially for those of us who engage in appreciable night-time driving.
 

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Aftermarket bulbs are not legal, but at least there is some testing going on with vendors like this guy (LED's tested in the actual cars he recommends them for):


That said, there is a huge difference between an LED that specifically matches the light output and placement of a halogen bulb and an HID insert that has a completely different (and vastly increased) light output and hot spot.

HID's should not be placed in halogen projectors or, worse, halogen reflector type headlamps, glare may not bother you as a driver, but it does bother other drivers, and it is not legal to inconvenience other drivers with your headlight mods.

At the time I did a retrofit to the Morimoto D2S HID projector the alternative LED solutions were not nearly as good as that modification. There are pages of posts over at NASIOC related to headlight mods, there are some on this forum as well. HID's are the brightest widely available headlight solution (maybe not as bright as laser, but brighter than LED's, at least for now) and in a projector designed for them are not blinding other drivers.

How this discussion became conflated to "HID and IIHS fanboys" and emojis I am sure nobody knows.

There is also a huge difference between seat of the pants observations and scientific testing, if headlamp design and light output was easy, more auto manufacturers would pass the IIHS testing. A new bulb may appear brighter but not provide the same range or dispersion, or may increase the glare others driving toward you have to deal with. That is probably why no headlight mods are legal (debate that with the NHTSA, Europe has their own agencies that deal with this same issue).

I would debate more, but now I buy cars with good OEM headlights so I won't have to do the research that is better left to the experts (I am not an engineer). More auto manufacturers are starting to produce better headlights (usually requiring upper trim purchases) and part of that is probably the IIHS testing and grading.
 

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My 2010 had projector bi-xenon (HID) headlamps. My 2019 has LED's. Honestly, there's not a huge difference between the two cars, IMO. The LED's are certainly brighter in the same coverage area, but their effective range is competitive with my last car. Either way, I'm happy with the light output. And I'd agree with others here that the auto high beam function is very nice and works excellently.
 

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Youtube knows what you are thinking, or at least searching for, here was a suggestion that popped up for me today:

A pretty thoughtful Youtube review that pretty much encapsulates this entire thread, specific to LED inserts, the video side by side analysis is consistent with the still photos posted already, along with some other non-scientific testing.

He also compares OEM LED lights with inserts. These are the 'modern' LED design that places the emitters in the same area as a halogen filament.

I still defer to IIHS testing, but judge for yourself.


His summary (for those too lazy to watch), everyone would love more light, but at the expense of blinding others it does not seem worth it...
 

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It looks like the LED headlight were improved after February.


Mazda also recently made improvements to the premium curve-adaptive LED projector headlights available with the Mazda 3 sedan and hatchback. Those headlights earn a good rating for models built after February. Earlier models rate acceptable. The sedan and hatchback also earn acceptable ratings for their base headlights and had previously qualified for TOP SAFETY PICK+ awards.
 

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Please see this video to appreciate the 2020 Mazda 3 new headlight system.
Upon startup, you can actually see the lights adjusting up and down to achieve its level stance, and the light turns with the steering wheel movement. The "dip" from high beam is instantaneous, and the light temperature and coverage is best I had ever experienced.
I was told these headlights will cost ~US$3,000 in Canada, per piece, if damaged.


Very nice presentation …...but is not applicable in NA. This for EU market.
 

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My 2020 3 premium hatch has adaptive auto dimming lights. So does my 2017 CX5 GT.
As delivered, there was a slight delay in reaction in the auto dimmers in my 3, enough that I was occasionally getting back flashes from oncoming drivers. That never was a problem with the noticeably quicker reacting system in the 5. Sensitivity is adjustable/programmable and I reset it to be as sensitive as possible in the 3. I stopped getting flashed in the 3 but I can still detect it's not as fast as the 5.
 

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IIHS rates the 2018 headlights and previous models as acceptable at best.

Could someone with a 2019 Showbox jiofi.local.html tplinklogin give me their subjective review of the 2019 headlight output?

Better than the 2018 or previous?

I realize there may be LED and halogen, so please specify.

Thanks.
Don't know what possible upgrades/changes they made from 2017/2018 model years.
 
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