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@arathol Im tempted to use those DBA gold rotors thru a -30C winter to prove once and forall that drilled rotor technology and development has caught up and obliterated the age old problem of cracking rotors since obviously there is a few hold outs who still don't believe.
I'm not sure what effect really low temps would have except better cooling.
The cracking issues are not completely solved by any means. I think it depends on what the driving conditions are. If you are doing track days where you are using high temp pads and doing a lot of laps with heavy braking, yeah you might see some, but for autox or fast street, probably not unless you are getting totally off the wall.
 

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but what are people's methods for stopping that also drive a manual transmission?

When approaching a stop, do you downshift gears as you slow down to allow the engine to brake for you or do you engage the brakes to slow down and ride them to a complete stop... engaging the clutch as you are close to stopping and then dropping it into neutral as you complete the stop?

What about it in stop and go? Do you drop gears and rev match to slow down as the cars slow down in front of you? I was able to ride most of my way in today with barely touching the brakes and engaging pretty smooth shifts the whole time. Blipping the gas pedal as you downshift and so forth.. Might save my brake pads some in the long run.
CK
 

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Coming to a stop light I engage the clutch and down shift to the gear i think i'd need if the light/condition changed, as i slow down via the brakes i continue to change gears holding at second until i stop, then drop to neutral.
My thinking is that i'd rather change brake pads than clutch/engine parts
Now round-a-bouts are another matter, control speed by down shifting roll through part of it then power out...
It's fun racing in my own little world... lol


Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but what are people's methods for stopping that also drive a manual transmission?
 

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Coming to a stop, and if I have the space, I downshift one gear at a time, usually until reaching second speed, and then I start breaking, and clutching, to full stop.
I never, never downshift to first gear!
 

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That makes sense. I need to start downshifting more as I am braking..

I was thinking that automatic transmissions downshift as you are applying the brakes. I had a 2016 Mazda 3 hatchback and the brake pads lasted 2 years without needing to be replaced. My 2018 with a manual transmission had the rear pads replaced at less than a year and now the fronts are toast at a year and a half and the rotors have heat damage.

I contacted Mazda to see if they could assist with the cost of the brake pads/rotors since they wore down so quickly.
CK
 

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Quick question.

I have a new Mazda 3 2.0 Automatic. First time Mazda owner and loving it.

I drive a lot of mountain roads with 4000 feet elevation gain and loss. When coming down, the engine is slicker than slick and doesn't offer much resistance.

If I really want to have engine brake to much reduce use of the brake pads, I often have down shift until the engine is revving around 4000 rpm. Occasionally it will first hit 5000 and then go down to 4000 and then to 3000. That seems very high.

Am I risking my gear box and engine wear?

What is the right way to use engine braking in the Mazda 3? I have never had a car that glides so effortless on 6th which tells me that somehow, Mazda engineered the whole drive train system for minimal drag compared to all our other vehicles.

Thanks in advance for any help. :smile2:
Several observations I have made with my 2014 sGT hatch w/AT (and tech package):
When driving in sport mode, it holds the RPMs very high as I coast (slicker than slick). When not in sport mode, the I-ELOOP regenerative braking system kicks in as soon as I lift out of the gas and it stops coasting quick. If I'm paying good attention, I can moderate my speed very easily in stop and go traffic, and roll right up to the stopped traffic at a light without hardly using the brakes at all.

With regards to downshifting to slow down, I think the car can sense if you're in the brakes or not when you downshift. And I think it holds the RPM's higher when you are not as if you mean to get into the gas and accelerate briskly. It's anticipating and responding in time. I know this because I regularly hammer the paddles quickly a few times to get it down into second when slowing aggressively (or even if just knowing I am going to be getting to a stop sooner than if I were coasting to one). I can shed MPH very fast that way without getting into the brake pedal at all.

Is that hard on the transmission? Time will tell I guess. It doesn't seem to be fighting it at all as it going to downshift through each gear anyway... it just doesn't have to be ready to accelerate and I'm getting it to where it's going quicker.

As an automatic it has to sort of guess what to do next. And it's default is performance/responsiveness in a "get going faster soon" capacity, not a "let's get it slowed down" mode. I'm just letting it know what my intentions are.

45K miles with 50% or so on the original fronts and rears. And I really think that's more of function of the regenerative braking than it is downshifting.
 

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Makes sense also.

I have been far too lazy and not downshifting far enough when slowing or coming to a stop.

I have been doing that more regularly now and am able to stab brake, downshift and then coast to a stop.

Far less wear on the pads and rotors this way.
CK

P.S. Mazda contacted my dealership. They said it was regular wear and tear on my brake pads/rotors failing so early. Mazda Corp. said they couldn't help.
 
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