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Um, no, wrong again.
Too easy but if your just learning I can help. maybe you should go to the track more often with your pieced together suspension

"This matters because steering is the driver’s main line of communication with the car; distortion in the guidance channel makes every other perception more difficult to comprehend."

Electric Power Steering: Pros and Cons

The electric power steering system (EPS) was introduced approximately a decade ago as a more effective alternative to hydraulic power steering. EPS uses an electric motor with sensors that detect the torque of the steering column, to which a computer applies assistive torque via the motor. This can benefit the driver by easing the pressure of driving, but is also beneficial for removing some weight from the vehicle with the elimination of the hydraulic pump, cooler, fluid and hoses. The downside to electric power steering systems—and those pursuing auto careers may attest to this—is that much of the freedom of driving is lost. There is a widespread complaint that vehicles with electric power steering have a “lack of feel” when driving, because much of the manual process has been diverted from driver to electric motor and sensors.

Engineers are well aware of its inherent shortcomings, some of which prompt our negative bias toward this type of power assist. These include far more friction and inertia than hydraulic, shortcomings that can make a car feel numb. No wonder hydraulic is better than electric assist

Wonder why a Lotus Elise or Dodge Viper ACR use old school steering AND NOT ELECTRICAL, maybe its because

"driving a car with electric steering is like having sex while wearing three condoms."

I win
 

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Super Moderator
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Too easy but if your just learning I can help. maybe you should go to the track more often with your pieced together suspension

"This matters because steering is the driver’s main line of communication with the car; distortion in the guidance channel makes every other perception more difficult to comprehend."

Electric Power Steering: Pros and Cons

The electric power steering system (EPS) was introduced approximately a decade ago as a more effective alternative to hydraulic power steering. EPS uses an electric motor with sensors that detect the torque of the steering column, to which a computer applies assistive torque via the motor. This can benefit the driver by easing the pressure of driving, but is also beneficial for removing some weight from the vehicle with the elimination of the hydraulic pump, cooler, fluid and hoses. The downside to electric power steering systems—and those pursuing auto careers may attest to this—is that much of the freedom of driving is lost. There is a widespread complaint that vehicles with electric power steering have a “lack of feel” when driving, because much of the manual process has been diverted from driver to electric motor and sensors.

Engineers are well aware of its inherent shortcomings, some of which prompt our negative bias toward this type of power assist. These include far more friction and inertia than hydraulic, shortcomings that can make a car feel numb. No wonder hydraulic is better than electric assist

Wonder why a Lotus Elise or Dodge Viper ACR use old school steering AND NOT ELECTRICAL, maybe its because

"driving a car with electric steering is like having sex while wearing three condoms."

I win
Once again more incoherent rambling
:confused1::confused1::confused1:
Nice cut and paste from the Automotive Training Centre story on the Ferrari Electric Power Steering system. You do know that story is 2 years old and a lot of advances have been made since then? But then again, if you are looking at the Automotive Training Centre I can only assume you are just trying to understand the basics right now.

If you actually knew what you were talking about you would know that the power steering system has nothing to do with the shock tower brace, the real subject of this discussion. You would also know what that particular brace does and how it does it. Maybe the Automotive Training Centre has a page on that too so you can practice some of your cut and paste skills?
Oh, by the way, there is nothing wrong with electric power steering if its been tuned right. Mazdas system is actually quite good. The Elise does not have power assisted steering of any sort, electric or otherwise. It is light enough so that doesn't need it and power steering just adds weight.
The Viper ACR has hydraulic assist because it is a race car certified for road use. Also, good electric power steering is a fairly recent thing. The Viper is a thing of the past now. There is no sense designing an advanced electric system for a car that is going out of production this year.

You lose.

Again.
:laughing019::laughing019:​
 

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Working Class Hero
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Here's some good reading concerning the topic of electric power steering. Mazda column mounts the motor, a system believed by some to be superior for handling and feel.


Automotive Electronics Banner
Electronic Power Steering
Basic Description
electric power steering diagram
Power steering systems supplement the torque that the driver applies to the steering wheel. Traditional power steering systems are hydraulic systems, but electric power steering (EPS) is becoming much more common. EPS eliminates many HPS components such as the pump, hoses, fluid, drive belt, and pulley. For this reason, electric steering systems tend to be smaller and lighter than hydraulic systems.
EPS systems have variable power assist, which provides more assistance at lower vehicle speeds and less assistance at higher speeds. They do not require any significant power to operate when no steering assistance is required. For this reason, they are more energy efficient than hydraulic systems.
How the system works:

The EPS electronic control unit (ECU) calculates the assisting power needed based on the torque being applied to the steering wheel by the driver, the steering wheel position and the vehicle’s speed.
The EPS motor rotates a steering gear with an applied force that reduces the torque required from the driver.
There are four forms of EPS based on the position of the assist motor. They are the column assist type (C-EPS), the pinion assist type (P-EPS), the direct drive type (D-EPS) and the rack assist type (R-EPS). The C-EPS type has a power assist unit, torque sensor, and controller all connected to the steering column. In the P-EPS system, the power assist unit is connected to the steering gear's pinion shaft. This type of system works well in small cars. The D-EPS system has low inertia and friction because the steering gear and assist unit are a single unit. The R-EPS type has the assist unit connected to the steering gear. R-EPS systems can be used on mid- to full-sized vehicles due to their relatively low inertia from high reduction gear ratios.
Unlike a hydraulic power steering system that continuously drives a hydraulic pump, the efficiency advantage of an EPS system is that it powers the EPS motor only when necessary. This results in reduced vehicle fuel consumption compared to the same vehicle with an HPS system. These systems can be tuned by simply modifying the software controlling the ECU. This provides a unique and cost effective opportunity to adjust the steering "feel" to suit the automotive model class. An additional advantage of EPS is its ability to compensate for one-sided forces such as a flat tire. It is also capable of steering in emergency maneuvers in conjunction with the electronic stability control.
In current-day systems, there is always a mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the steering gear. For safety reasons, it is important that a failure in the electronics never result in a situation where the motor prevents the driver from steering the vehicle. EPS systems incorporate fail-safe mechanisms that disconnect power from the motor in the event that a problem with the ECU is detected.
The next step in electronic steering is to remove the mechanical linkage to the steering wheel and convert to pure electronically controlled steering, which is referred to as steer-by-wire. This functions by transmitting digital signals to one or more remote electric motors instead of a rack and pinion assembly, which in-turn steers the vehicle. While it has been used in electric forklifts and some tractors, as well as a handful of concept cars, the 2014 Infinity Q50 was the first commercial vehicle to implement steer-by-wire. Although there is normally no direct mechanical linkage, the Q50 has a mechanical back-up. In the event that a problem is detected with the electronic controls, a clutch engages to restore the driver's mechanical control. As with throttle control systems, it is likely that steer-by-wire will become the standard once the electronic controls prove to be safer and more reliable than the current hybrid systems.
Sensors
Steering wheel torque sensor, steering wheel position sensor, wheel speed sensor
Actuators
Electric motor
Data Communications
CAN bus data communication between EPS and engine controller
Manufacturers
Bosch, Denso, Hella, JTEKT, Kobelt, Koyo, Mitsubishi Electric, Nexteer, NSK, Preh, Showa, TRW, ZF
For More Information
[1] Power Steering, Wikipedia.
[2] Electric Power Steering (EPS), Freescale web site.
[3] Electric Power Steering, www.aa1car.com.
[4] Research Analysis: A Review of Electric Power Steering Systems, Matthew Beecham, Just-auto.com, Aug. 6, 2007.
[5] BMW Electric Power Steering EPS, YouTube, Nov. 21, 2008.
[6] Hyundai Power Steering (MDPS), YouTube, July 15, 2009.
[7] Are We Losing Touch? A Comprehensive Comparison Test of Electric and Hydraulic Steering Assist, Car and Driver, Jan. 2012.
[8] Nissan Introduces Fly-by-Wire Independent Steering Control Technology, YouTube, Oct. 17, 2012.
[9] Electric Power Assist Steering from Ford Motor Company, YouTube, Mar. 14, 2013.
[10] Top Tech Cars 2013: Infiniti Q50, Lawrence Ulrich, IEEE Spectrum, Mar. 29, 2013.
[11] Car Tech 101: Power Steering Explained, YouTube, Apr. 1, 2014.
Updates or corrections to this web page should be emailed to [email protected].
Return to CVEL Automotive Electronic Systems Page.


http://www.cvel.clemson.edu/auto/systems/ep_steering.html

Sent from a Samsung that doesn't explode.
 

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Installed the Tanabe FSTB yesterday. I like it a lot more than the CS FSTB.

The Tanabe bar came with locking flanged M10 x 1.25 nuts to replace the OEM ones.

This was a major issue with the CS bar, as you need to reuse the OEM nuts. The OEM nuts only have 3 threads on the top and none on the bottom half. This destroys the nuts and threading that pokes through the strut tower.

The Tanabe bar also attaches to all three strut tower threads, whereas CS only has 2 connecting.

I just ordered a replacement strut rubber mounts.. for the second time.. as one of the 4 threads the CS bar was connected to became unusable.. again..
CK
 

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Installed the Tanabe FSTB yesterday. I like it a lot more than the CS FSTB.
I waffled between the Tanabe and CS bar. I'm now even more convinced that I made the better choice in buying the Tanabe. I also like to add that the Tanabe bar is way cheaper (around $120-150 shipped vs $200 shipped for the CS). The Tanabe's price is even more attractive considering it is made in Japan. I never seen the CS bar in person, but looking the pics on their CS's website, the welds on the bracket looks kind of sloppy IMO. Also, with the Tanabe, you can adjust the length so that the bar can exert outward force between the strut towers, making it even more effect (at least in theory). The CS bar is non-adjustable.
 

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In my opinion, the design of the CS bar is about the same as the Megan Racing one, which can we had for a third of the cost. If you want a true solid brace, a one piece is the only way to go.

All of these things said, I got the Megan one even though I can drive to CS locally and not pay shipping. It looks like I paid $82 USD with free shipping.


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Megan Racing makes some good products. I have their Adjustable Toe Arms and Lower H-Brace. I'm sure the FSTB is a good piece too.

I just really liked the Tanabe bar. It sits a little lower than the CS bar, its adjustable, and it applies more outward pressure between the strut towers IMO.. as Kontai69 mentioned too.. plus it's cool looking. :)
CK
 

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Installed the Tanabe FSTB yesterday. I like it a lot more than the CS FSTB.

The Tanabe bar came with locking flanged M10 x 1.25 nuts to replace the OEM ones.

This was a major issue with the CS bar, as you need to reuse the OEM nuts. The OEM nuts only have 3 threads on the top and none on the bottom half. This destroys the nuts and threading that pokes through the strut tower.

The Tanabe bar also attaches to all three strut tower threads, whereas CS only has 2 connecting.

I just ordered a replacement strut rubber mounts.. for the second time.. as one of the 4 threads the CS bar was connected to became unusable.. again..
CK
Where did you bought your Tanabe?
 

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