2004 to 2016 Mazda 3 Forum and Mazdaspeed 3 Forums banner

21 - 40 of 50 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
It seems that the brakes for most current Mazda cars are interchangeable. If the CX-9 brakes work on the CX-5 as has already been demonstrated, and the CX-5 brakes fit the Mazda6, and the brakes from the Mazda6 bolt right on to the Mazda3, then it follows that the CX-9 brakes should fit the Mazda3.
Once it warms up here in a few weeks this looks to be the next project for me... :)
Yea, im hoping...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
It's up to you what will use. Any steel pipe with correct diameter will do the work.
I just think it would be less costly in the long run. If for whatever reason the threads get galled on the car side, it would be more expensive than a ruined Helicoil. Plus, if you ever sell the car, the next owner might mess things up if you keep them on there. Just my .02.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
I just think it would be less costly in the long run. If for whatever reason the threads get galled on the car side, it would be more expensive than a ruined Helicoil. Plus, if you ever sell the car, the next owner might mess things up if you keep them on there. Just my .02.
The are no threads on the knuckle (car side) for mounting the caliper. The threads are on the caliper. So it's completely reversible to stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Very clever solution, and thanks for documenting and sharing your project. Nice job maintaining the front/rear brake balance by varying the friction coefficients, BTW.
I'd imagine that the brake pedal travel is longer now, even if the input force is equivalent, since the calipers require a larger volume of fluid than stock. Has this been your experience?

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Funny, that. I'll brush up on Archimedes' principle, and get back to you with a more intelligent question.

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
Nah its ok. I understand why you would think that, but, just cause the capacity is there, only means theres more fluid in the system, not having to push it further. You just simply put more fluid in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
Very clever solution, and thanks for documenting and sharing your project. Nice job maintaining the front/rear brake balance by varying the friction coefficients, BTW.
I'd imagine that the brake pedal travel is longer now, even if the input force is equivalent, since the calipers require a larger volume of fluid than stock. Has this been your experience?

Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk
Actually, no. I don't feel more pedal travel, seems the same. I'm more confident while braking as the brakes grab harder and initial bite is higher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts

I must have been really tired when I posted about Archimedes...what I needed to brush up on was the principle of hydraulic work. By increasing the caliper piston's area relative to the master cylinder's piston area, you've increased the brake pedal's mechanical advantage (i.e. leverage) at the expense of a longer stroke on the master cylinder piston to move the caliper piston the same distance.

Please refer to the linked diagram. A large movement of the smaller (master cylinder) piston creates a small movement of the larger (caliper) piston, and the mechanical advantage is proportional to the ratio of the larger piston's area divided by the smaller one's. The inverse of this ratio applies to the length of their strokes. For example, if the area ratio of the larger piston to the smaller one is initially 3/1, then the stroke length of the smaller piston is 3X that of the larger piston. Thus, if the smaller (master cylinder) piston area remains the same, and the larger (caliper) piston area increases, then the smaller piston's stroke lengths will increase by the same ratio. Returning to the previous example, if the caliper piston -to- master cylinder area ratio increases from 3/1 to 4/1, then the master cylinder piston's stroke length increases to 4X that of the caliper piston's.

Does that make sense?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
I'm aware of physics principles, however in really pedal travel seems the same. There is one thing which I'm not sure whether I mention it.
The Mazda front brake rotor is 25 mm thick, but the original brake rotor for Evo 4 caliper is 24 mm. It does fit without a problem, however that extra 1 mil of thickness could have impact on pedal travel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
I'm aware of physics principles, however in really pedal travel seems the same. There is one thing which I'm not sure whether I mention it.
The Mazda front brake rotor is 25 mm thick, but the original brake rotor for Evo 4 caliper is 24 mm. It does fit without a problem, however that extra 1 mil of thickness could have impact on pedal travel.
Not if the caliper is also 1mm thinner, or if they dont retract all the way. Once you meet the rotor surface, any pedal travel is in the caliper, not the rotor width. So since youre using EVO calipers and rotors, there should be no difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Also, are you sure its a 14mm hole in the bracket and not 16mm? Personally i would feel safer using a shoulder bolt, but cant find a 14mm with 12mm threads, but i can 16/12

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
Also, are you sure its a 14mm hole in the bracket and not 16mm? Personally i would feel safer using a shoulder bolt, but cant find a 14mm with 12mm threads, but i can 16/12

Yes, it's 14 mm.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,867 Posts
Yea, im hoping...
Well, got the part today. The part number on the box was correct, the part inside wasn't.....I don't know what it is for but it isn't the right part. Its tiny, smaller than the Mazda 3 caliper bracket. The mounting bolt hole centers are more than 2" too close. It doesn't look anything like a CX-9 caliper bracket..... 😩
 
21 - 40 of 50 Posts
Top